2nd HD not working after Win 7 installation

Hewlett-packard / Px721aa-aba m7160n
September 24, 2011 at 22:34:08
Specs: Windows 7, 2.8 GHz / 3326 MB
My primary HD failed, so I bought a new drive and decided to upgrade from XP to 7. Win 7 works fine right from the start, but my computer no longer recognizes my 2nd HD, on which I store all my data. When I start the computer with the 2nd drive connected, it appears as though the computer is trying to boot from the 2nd drive, so of course Windows doesn't start. I checked the boot order, but the 2nd HD isn't listed. Could someone please point me in the right direction so I can get a handle on this? I'm happy to supply any further info necessary. Thanks; you guys have helped me before, and I appreciate your assistance again.

See More: 2nd HD not working after Win 7 installation

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#1
September 25, 2011 at 03:45:26
1st HD, IDE or Sata?
2nd HD, IDE or Sata?

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#2
September 25, 2011 at 06:59:27
Also:
Was the drive connected when you installed W7?
If IDE what are the jumper settings? What is also on the same cable?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
September 25, 2011 at 08:02:50
Both drives are SATA.
The 2nd drive was not connected when installing Windows 7.
The primary drive is connected to the MoBo via SATA 1; the secondary via SATA 3 (individual cables).

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Related Solutions

#4
September 25, 2011 at 15:05:29
Try Sata 0 and SATA 1 or other combinations.
Try a different power and signal cable on the drive that is not properly recognized.
What does the BIOS show for the 2nd drive?
Try resetting BIOS to defaults.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
September 25, 2011 at 16:37:42
Go into the bios & make sure it is set to Auto detect.

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#6
September 28, 2011 at 05:36:18
1) There is no SATA 0, only SATA 1-4. I moved the cable from SATA 3 to SATA 4.
2) BIOS shows first boot device as floppy (uninstalled), 2nd device as HDD, 3rd as DVD drive. BIOS reset to default settings.
3) There is no Auto Detect setting.

After all this, there is no change.

More details- If the 2nd hard drive is connected at startup, the computer goes to the HP splash screen, which normally gives me access to the boot menu and BIOS- but if the 2nd drive is connected, I cannot access the boot menu or BIOS. At this point, the computer begins a clicking sound, the same sound it makes when shutting down (although normally it only clicks once on shutdown). Eventually after a minute or so of clicking, the screen goes black with a blinking cursor in the upper left corner of the screen.

Does it sound like the 2nd drive is toast?


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#7
September 28, 2011 at 06:26:33
"Does it sound like the 2nd drive is toast?'
It does, try it in another comp.

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#8
September 28, 2011 at 09:41:07
But even if it IS history, I don't see why the computer won't boot with it connected. Shouldn't it just boot from the C drive and ignore a bad non-boot drive?

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#9
September 28, 2011 at 15:08:33
Too hard to know what is going on, it's a process of elimination.

If you hav'nt got anything installed to tell me the motherboard & bios models, I use this.

Go down to Hardware > Motherboard > Model.
Bios > Bios Vendor & Bios Version.

SIW
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.softpedia.com/progScreen...
http://www.gtopala.com/


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#10
September 29, 2011 at 06:19:57
John-

Here's the M/B info from SIW:

Property Value
Manufacturer ASUSTek Computer INC.
Model LIMESTONE
Version 1.05
Serial Number MB-1234567890

North Bridge Intel i945P/PL/G/GZ Revision A2
South Bridge Intel 82801GB (ICH7/R) Revision A2

CPU Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 2.80GHz
Cpu Socket Socket 775 LGA

System Slots 6 PCI

Memory Summary
Maximum Capacity 4096 MBytes
Maximum Memory Module Size 1024 MBytes
Memory Slots 4
Error Correction None

Warning! Accuracy of DMI data cannot be guaranteed

and the BIOS:

Property Value
BIOS Vendor Phoenix Technologies, LTD
BIOS Version 3.17
BIOS Date 04/20/2006
BIOS Size 512 KB
BIOS Starting Segment E000h
DMI Version 2.4
Characteristics - supports ISA
- supports PCI
- supports Plug-and-Play
- supports APM
- upgradeable (Flash) BIOS
- allows BIOS shadowing
- supports booting from CD-ROM
- supports selectable boot
- BIOS ROM is socketed
- supports Enhanced Disk Drive specification
- supports INT 13 5.25-inch/360K floppy services
- supports INT 13 5.25-inch/1.2M floppy services
- supports INT 13 3.5-inch/720K floppy services
- supports INT 13 3.5-inch/2.88M floppy services
- supports INT 05 print-screen
- supports INT 09 and 8042 keyboard services
- supports INT 14 serial services
- supports INT 17 printer services
- supports INT 10 CGA/Mono video services
- supports ACPI
- supports legacy USB
- supports booting from LS-120
- supports booting from ATAPI ZIP drive
- BIOS Boot Specification supported
- Function key-initiated Network Service boot supported


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#11
September 29, 2011 at 15:21:49
I was hoping that I might fluke a comp here with the same bios version, so I could look for the "Auto detect" setting, came close, mine has in Advanced a listing > Drive Configuration. Pressing > Enter, shows ATA/IDE Configuration [Enhanced]
Then down the page, all the drives are listed.

Another setting to look for in any part of your bios, is > AHCI, try the different settings, reboot after each change.

Also on this page.
http://www./resource/inst...
Note: Serial ATA is a new interface type. Some older systems may see the drive and classify it as a SCSI device if you are using a Serial ATA host adapter. This is normal even though this is not a SCSI disc drive. This does not affect drive performance or capacity.

This is a good post & may have your answer.
http://en.kioskea.net/forum/affich-...


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#12
October 4, 2011 at 14:07:15
John-

I appreciate your advice. I am currently in the process of moving and it may be another week or 2 before I am able to continue with your diagnostic procedure. I will resume this conversation as soon as possible. Thanks.


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#13
November 14, 2011 at 11:46:57
John-

Thanks for standing by. I have tried the drive in a friend's computer. With my drive installed, Windows hung up on the start up screen. The computer was powered down and restarted. This time we entered BIOS; the drive was on the list of drives. However, trying to select that drive in the BIOS list resulted in a hang up; all navigational controls in BIOS were lost. After 20 minutes of inactivity, we reluctantly pulled the plug on the computer. We removed my hard drive. When the computer was restarted, we suspected a problem, so instead of "starting Windows normally," we chose to run a diagnostic scan. The scan came up with a "Critical Error" message and said that the computer would need to be restored (which we did successfully).

I imagine the drive is junk, and I'll have to utilize one of the expensive recovery services to get this data back. Any thoughts? It just seems odd to me that both drives failed at exactly the same time, even though they were several years apart in age. Thanks.


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#14
November 14, 2011 at 16:59:38
"Any thoughts? It just seems odd to me that both drives failed at exactly the same time"

No idea how you setup the drives, but to get yours as slave, you must in the bios boot selection, have your friends booting first.


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#15
November 14, 2011 at 20:37:41
Are you sure that the primary drive was actually bad? Your problem could have been this drive all along.

It is possible that the circuit board on the drive is fried/shorted and that is why it is not letting the system reach boot up. Sometimes getting the exact model and version of the drive and swapping out the boards will let you extract your data. If it works, after you create a good back up, switch the board back and use the newer drive.

Is this a Seagate drive? I have seen too many of them fail (been keeping count so I just wanted to know).

Always make some reliable provision for a back up of your important files, I like an internal hard drive with Windows automatically backing up for me.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
December 13, 2011 at 03:45:58
Conclusion:

I ended up sending the drive to a data recovery service. The assessment was that a liquid or oil had been introduced into the hard drive and had damaged the platter surfaces. The data was deemed not recoverable (even though their motto is "Recovering the Unrecoverable!"). Not sure what the liquid was- possibly some lubricant I once used on the graphics card fan, but I'm not sure how it entered the hard drive.


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#17
December 13, 2011 at 03:58:59
So a big thanks to everyone who offered advice and opinions. It just didn't work out happily this time.

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#18
December 13, 2011 at 04:12:54
Bad luck flon_klar, thanks for letting us know.

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