Creative Sound Blaster 16 AWE32 Prob Win 3.1

September 27, 2011 at 08:29:53
Specs: Windows 3.1, 133 DX5 32MB Ram
Hello there and here is a really odd problem:

Currently I have partitioned my HDD with 502mb (Primary), 49gb (Logical) and 50gb (Logical) with corresponding Operating system: Windows 3.1, Windows 2000 and windows 2000 Server Family.

Both windows 2000 OS's install the ISA Creative Soundcard CT4380 with this configuration:

Port 220, Interrupt 5, DMH 1 DML 5 (Default settings)

However windows 3.1 completely ignores it and no matter what setting I use the sound card will not work. I have used Creative Diagnostic sound card software and they too have trouble seeing it. I get this error: IO Base incorrect. There are no jumpers on my motherboard that changes the bus configuration and the BIOS has no such function to edit the same configurations.

What is more puzzling is this same sound card a few years ago worked on windows 3.1 before I upgraded the OS from win3.1 to 95. I have since then re-installed windows 3.1 from the computers original floppy disks. I have also attempted to install the sound card via its original software CD which keeps giving me the same errors and will not install unless it can see the sound card.

Hope someone out there can help! Thanks in advanced.


See More: Creative Sound Blaster 16 AWE32 Prob Win 3.1

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#1
September 28, 2011 at 11:59:37
@Kushan

1) What motherboard do you have, and 2) is it onboard sound or ISA? I do know on my Windows 3.11 machine that 220, 5 and 1 are the correct settings, as you have.

http://sdfox7.com


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#2
September 28, 2011 at 15:55:28
@sdfox7 re:pip22

This forum gets trolled from time to time. Usually in the form of derision of the Win 3.x operating system. Since I revisited Win 3.x a couple of years ago as a hobby with an old machine, I have found more interesting aspects of the system and clever DOS programs from the past than I will ever find in modern iPhone apps.

Although Win 3.x is a most glaringly outmoded operating system, it is capable of carrying broadband and even in the DOS environment can use broadband for email, textual web browsing and many other internet activities. Demonstrating it's ability to people who visit, is met at first with cynical incredulity and then sudden amazement.


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#3
September 28, 2011 at 20:00:19
What surprises me the most is the usability of these operating systems which are about 20 years old. When DOS and Windows 3.x were released I don't think the Internet was a primary focus; nevertheless they are quite functional OSes online and for personal/business use. Even the old Microsoft Office works fine as most people I know still save their work in the old formats and have not embraced Office open XML formats (.docx, .xlsx, .pptx etc).

The only questionable subject is secure web browsing for paying bills, bank statements, etc. I don't know that a SSL compliant browser exists for these platforms; there are earlier flavors of SSL with the older browsers but many sites require SSL 2 or 3. Do you know of any?

Of course: if you enjoy doing things old school like running Windows 3.x, there's nothing wrong with paying bills the old school way and picking up the phone. None of my creditors charge a fee for paying bills with a checking account.

http://sdfox7.com


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Related Solutions

#4
September 28, 2011 at 22:42:42
The only questionable subject is secure web browsing for paying bills, bank statements, etc. I don't know that a SSL compliant browser exists for these platforms; there are earlier flavors of SSL with the older browsers but many sites require SSL 2 or 3. Do you know of any?

I don't think there are any. If there is, I want to hear it. Email is hard enough to get going with the newer SSL implementations most mail servers now use. I have only had success with DOS (of all things!) with email, by using Fred C. Macall's PMSMTP/PMPULL programs to retrieve and send emails with my own ISP's mailboxes.


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#5
September 29, 2011 at 09:17:20
I remember signing up for an AOL account while in elementary high school way back in 1994, they sent out the AOL 1.0 on floppies.

I use legacy programs frequently on my respectable collection of legacy machines (mostly laptops since they take up less space). All AOL clients including the 16-bit ones still connect to AOL without a hitch, and AOL 2.5 and later can use high-speed over TCP/IP. As I am always testing new configurations, all these clients have worked well in the last 6 months and still download the .UTF updates that AOL releases (also known as Tools on Demand or ".TOD updates"). This is all stored on a server somewhere and being that AOL has been around for the last 20 years will probably exist indefinitely.

The only version I haven't tested is AOL for DOS, for which I don't have a copy of. The earliest copy I own is AOL 1.1 from March 1993.

Anyway, getting back to your original point, your best bet is using Pegasus Mail (all the way at the bottom of the page). I recall someone posting here recently that it was the last of the DOS/Windows 3.x SSL mail clients.

If that link ever goes down, the Wayback Machine's snapshot from July 16, 2011 works flawlessly with the download button. You'll notice that the download's .EXE package is permanently linked to web.archive.org, not Pegasus Mail's server. It was just recently that I realized the Wayback Machine not only archives webpages, it also archives the files associated with the webpages.

http://sdfox7.com


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#6
September 29, 2011 at 12:15:15
Anyway, getting back to your original point, your best bet is using Pegasus Mail (all the way at the bottom of the page). I recall someone posting here recently that it was the last of the DOS/Windows 3.x SSL mail clients.

Tried Pegasus and yes the last version used to work for SSL. I was not able to get it to work in Windows. It's a long time since I tried it. I read on Fred Macall's DOS website, that Pegasus for DOS can be used in conjunction withose programs I mentioned and it will work. Or, you can use them without an interface and they'll work fine as well. I have tested them recently and they do indeed work. So DOS is very much alive and is a handy adjunct of Win 3.x for these duties.

I was happy to find those DOS email programs and DOSLYNX (which allows you send email in the menu). I don't regularly use email on the old machine, so I have only used it for experimental purposes.

Setting up PMSMTP and PMPULL is not straightforward. But by following the instructions Fred provides carefully, they will indeed work. I am very fortunate to have an excellent Network card with an easy and seamless way to implement the DOS packet driver. It is a TRENDware TE-PCI/TE-100PCI Ethernet Adapter card and I have not seen another one since I found this particular one in the junkroom where I used to work. Of all the cards I have tried that have drivers for Win 3.11, this one works the best all around. But 3Com, Realtek and DLink are still okay.

You have obviously guessed by now that I use a cable connection at home.

http://users.ohiohills.com/fmacall/


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#7
October 3, 2011 at 02:17:06
Hello again,

It appears to have been the DVD-RW drive that kept knocking out the permissions to the IRQ's that the creative software was after. So I simply took off the DVD-RW and allowed the creative software to install. Once installed I re-connected the drive and it continued as normal. Thanks for those who were willing to help. :)


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