Windows system clock accelerates (2003 server)

March 7, 2012 at 14:40:57
Specs: Windows Server 2003 Standard, Athlon XP 2600+, 1.91GHz, 2GB RAM
Hi, My system clock in windows server 2003 standard edition keeps accelerating, I've pulled down all updates available from windows update, but it wont stop.

This is highly irritating as it seems unable to stabilize at all, in ~1 hour, its ~10 minutes faster (its speed keeps going up as long as the computer is on).

The clock in BIOS is working perfect, so the problem seems to be with windows.

I've searched google quite a bit but cant seem to find anything relevant.

Please help.

//Kind regards, me.


See More: Windows system clock accelerates (2003 server)

Report •

#1
March 7, 2012 at 14:56:58
what is the server using for a time server?
in the correct timezone?

type net time at a command prompt and post the results

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#2
March 7, 2012 at 15:05:16
Its not that the clock is off, it is speeding up. upon reboot, one second is closer to 800-900ms.

but since you asked, net time gives
------------------------------------------------------------------
Could not locate a time-server.

More help is available by typing NET HELPMSG 3912.
------------------------------------------------------------------

But I can use "control panel -> date and time -> internet time -> update" to reset the deviation, but that just puts the clock to its current correct time, it does not keep it from running away.

if updating against internet time is your solution, then I have to do it once every minute. thats how much too fast the clock is going.

//Regards

#Edit:
http://pastebin.com/iNBAQjmE
Systeminfo dump. WAN IP masked out.


Report •

#3
March 7, 2012 at 16:46:30
Don't know why you think the bios clock is correct then. No time server means it only gets its time from the builtin clock.

Solution is simple. Set a time server.

"if updating against internet time is your solution, then I have to do it once every minute"

You misunderstand how this works. You set the time by using the time from a time server not the clock built into the system.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 7, 2012 at 16:56:15
Yes, but you dont request the time constantly, only once a day, and in between the updates, it uses the system clock to increase the time. Updating against a time server sets the current time to that of the time server, then the local clock does the time-keeping based on that

Which means, even if I do update time from a time server, it will still be off between the updates.
And since the bios clock goes correctly, (measured against my cellphone), something inside windows is making the system clock count faster than supposed,

I read somewhere that there is certain problems with time-keeping in the HAL-layer :(
But since I only have Microsoft programs installed on it, since its a ISA firewall, I dont know what to do :(

Current solution is to install 2003 R2 and hope its better at timekeeping :(
But I'd like to avoid that since running windows update for 2 days is not that inviting :D
Especially not since my internet goes through that machine.

//Regards.


Report •

#5
March 14, 2012 at 15:15:00
I discarded that computer altogether and went with my other server instead, whose clock went right from the start.
Well, this one (or my workstation)
also drifts slightly, but it manages to sync itself once in a while, and the drifting is 1-2 seconds in like 2 hours, not 10 seconds in 1 minute :D


So, I'd like to select my own answer as best, that is; reinstall or scrap the computer :D


Report •

Ask Question