VPN tunnel info

Microsoft Windows server 2003
January 9, 2010 at 03:44:01
Specs: Windows Server 2003 standard
Hi everyone,

can anybody point me out a good reference on the internet to create a VPN tunnel between 2 networks?
Once done the connection...will I have computers on network1 and computers on network2 on the same subnet?
What are the advantages?
Thanks

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#1
January 9, 2010 at 06:09:48
There's a ton of info freely available on the web regarding VPN's. All you need to do is use google.

There are also many network appliances that are in fact VPN endpoints which you could use to create a VPN. I would google "VPN hardware" for more info on what's available.

Once done the connection...will I have computers on network1 and computers on network2 on the same subnet?

They could be. If they aren't now on the same subnet, you would simply change one site's subnet to that of the other. If they are on the same subnet's already, double check for duplicate IP's before creating the VPN.

What are the advantages?

In a nutshell, allowing a remote site access to local resources as if the users were sitting in the same location as those resources. Also, encryption (protection) of your data as it travels between sites over the internet. Lastly, a VPN is typically a LOT less expensive than a dedicated link between sites.


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#2
January 9, 2010 at 06:51:47
Thanks for your reply.
I was actually looking for a VPN hardware device, it seems Cisco (..i.e. Cisco asa) has the best and safest solution. Do you agree?

Shouldn`t I consider WinServer2003 VPN solution? Isn`t that safe as Cisco`s?
And with the new WinServer2008?
Thanks again


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#3
January 10, 2010 at 05:34:38
I was actually looking for a VPN hardware device, it seems Cisco (..i.e. Cisco asa) has the best and safest solution. Do you agree?

No I don't. Look around, there are going to be a lot of other manufacturers out there. What I would look for is:
- initial cost
- cost of ongoing support
- ease of setup

Cisco will get the pound of flesh nearest your heart for 2 and 3. I would try to get my hands on something I could configure myself without a big learning curve.

Shouldn`t I consider WinServer2003 VPN solution?

That's up to you. To be 100% honest, I wouldn't do it myself. Not Windows 2003 or 2008. What that amounts to is a software solution and those aren't always the best idea. If you want to go that route, use OpenBSD as your router/firewall/VPN Endpoint. At least that OS is free.

The other reason I wouldn't touch windows as a solution for this is the 3 things I said to look at above....well, they're as, or more expensive, from MS as they are from Cisco. If you know Windows Server OS very well and can setup a VPN endpoint on it yourself then that might be the most sensible solution. If however, you don't, well, you'd quickly find yourself over your head and you want something that works all the time. Not breaks every other day.


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