Shutdown W2003 DC affects W2003 / SQL 2005?

September 17, 2012 at 15:02:59
Specs: Windows 2003
Hi,

I have 2 servers. The first is a Windows 2003 server installed as Domain Controller.

Second is also Windows 2003 server with SQL server 2005 installed.

Can i shutdown the first server en will the second server still be reachable?

Many thanks


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#1
September 18, 2012 at 07:36:06
What exactly do you mean by "shut down"?

If you mean you need to reboot your DC, that should be no problem.

If you mean shut it down to quickly change out some hardware or add RAM or something like that, I think you'd be ok there too if you are able to keep downtime to a minimum and do it outside of peak usage hours.

If you mean shut the DC down forever, well yes, that's going to create a whole boatload of problems and not just for your SQL server.

The 2nd server should be reachable by all LAN clients while the DC is down.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
September 19, 2012 at 01:11:07
Thank you for your reply. Here more details:

In our office we use Mac's and Ubuntu machine's. We use one web application (linux / apache) that connect to the SQL server using tcp/ip.

We do not use the first server (w2003 SBS / domain controller). The second server (W2003 / SQL 2005) is used by the web applicaton. The first server is up because our MS engineer told us we cannot shutdown because of the second server.

Can i shutdown the first (SBS / DC) server without affecting the SQL (second) server? What happens with the SQL server if i shutdown the first server?
Is the database still reachable (we connect using local (sql) user accounts)?
Can i still login with remote desktop on the second server?


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#3
September 19, 2012 at 07:23:11
Thanks for the info, that helps.

Your first server, the 2003 SBS, is a domain controller and as such does need to be on, and active in order for domain clients to authenticate to the domain.

To answer your questions:

Can i shutdown the first (SBS / DC) server without affecting the SQL (second) server?

Again I have to ask you, how long of a shutdown are we talking about?

If you mean shut the domain controller down permanently, then no, you can't do that or your entire domain stops functioning correctly. If you're talking about a reboot or short shutdown for maintenance, then yes, you can do that.

What happens with the SQL server if i shutdown the first server?

As long as that server is on and connected to the domain before downing the DC, nothing.

Is the database still reachable (we connect using local (sql) user accounts)?

It should be, providing the internal (LAN) clients attempting to connect to it are already logged into the domain and authenticated to the domain controller before you shut the DC down.

Any clients attemping to login to the domain after shutting the DC down will not be authenticated, will not be able to therefore login to the domain and finally, will not be able to access domain resources.

Can i still login with remote desktop on the second server?

If you're talking from another internal client my response to the last question applies here too. If you're talking about from a remote client, that's a whole other ball of wax and requires more knowledge of your infrastructure.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
September 19, 2012 at 12:48:08
"Again I have to ask you, how long of a shutdown are we talking about?"

If possible forever :-)

The Linux/Mac clients connect with a username/password stored in SQL server so no domain validation on this point.

When i switch on the monitor of the server; i see a username, password and "Log on to" select box. The select box contains the computername (this computer) and the domainname, so there should be a way to login with the "local" Administrator account?

Rises another question: can i remove the second server permanently from the domain?


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#5
September 19, 2012 at 13:03:27
"The Linux/Mac clients connect with a username/password stored in SQL server so no domain validation on this point"

Sorry but this is incorrect. They have to authenicate to the server first before they can access /authenicate to the sql server. Unless you are using a front end program that is doing the sql connections.

If you want to drop the SBS all you need to do is take the SQL server and have it join a workgroup instead of a domain. Make sure you know/set the administrators password on this server before joining the workgroup.

You will then need to create all the users accounts on this server before they can access SQL unless you are using a front end program instead then you would not need to create all the users.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
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#6
September 19, 2012 at 13:29:58
Allright, i found this: http://www.ehow.com/how_6554982_rem... section "Removing a Non-Domain Controller".

If i enter the management studio (2005); expand databases, my database, security, users i see all my SQL users. These users are not known by the domain controller.

PHP (our web application) should be able to connect to the IP of the server on port 1433?


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#7
September 20, 2012 at 12:16:52
I'll give you a strong probably.

If (IF!) DB access authorization is being performed by the DB server and not the AD server (including the DB's account itself), and you severed the dependencies to the AD (including services like DNS and DHCP), and you remove the DB server from the domain (reboot of DB server required), and everything stays up, you should be able to run without the AD.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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