Solved Restarting Server 2003 after RAM upgrade

April 17, 2012 at 10:05:52
Specs: Windows Server 2003
Hi,

I have some experience with computers and programming but less with server maintenance. I am planning to upgrade the RAM for a server and my question is simply about restarting the server -- is there anything special that needs to be done to have the server continue working as it did before aside from just turning it back on? Are there any necessary administrative procedures once we switch the server back on?

Sincerely,
G


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✔ Best Answer
April 19, 2012 at 08:14:47
for the processes you describe, a few excel sheets and outlook, should not be maxing 2gig of ram.

you should run some malware/spyware scans

to check is exchange is running check the services

compress old files is only one of many check boxes in disk cleanup. I have never had a problem with running compress old files on the server. Not running defrag regularly can lead to a severely fragmented NTFS and the system will simply fail to boot.

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#1
April 17, 2012 at 11:26:35
First thing you have to consider is whether you are running a 32bit or 64 bit version of server 2003. I suspect you are only running a 32 bit version which can only addresses 4gig of ram.

How much ram does the server have now?

If exceeding 4gig ram with a 32bit OS you can utilize it for the system with the PAE and/or 3GB boot.ini switches but you should fully understand the consequences of such a change before doing so. Your hardware would need to support the PAE extension.

Usually after adding ram [and not dealing with exceeding 4gb] its just a matter of bringing up the server. No other changes required.

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#2
April 17, 2012 at 12:18:47
Hi, Thanks for your suggestions!

The first reply was also helpful, although I can't see it on the page for some reason. That reply had me look into whether we could add RAM "hot". Our server is running Windows Server 2003 Small Business Edition R2, so it looks to me like 4GB would be the max, and that we would have to turn the server off and back on.

The server has 2 GB of RAM at the moment and running awfully slow. I haven't looked into hardware yet...that would be a whole other study for me.

From looking at the perfmon.msc utility, it looks like "Avg. Disk Que" is maxed out most of the time. But we are barely running anything except internet, Outlook and occasional access to a file on the server from our seven workstations. My guess is the heaviest might be two Outlooks, two Excels and an Access file open at once.


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#3
April 18, 2012 at 14:36:34
When was the last time you ran disk cleanup and defragged the server drives?

SBS also comes with Exchange. I take it you are not running exchange?

Maxing out the ram is always a good idea.

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#4
April 18, 2012 at 17:31:25
I'm not sure if cleanup/defrag was ever done!

I read somewhere that the compression done by disk cleanup might not be the best for servers, so I did start defragging (reduced from 400,000 to 275,000 extra fragments) but stopped when we got some bugs.

Exchange appears to be installed but I'm not sure if we are running it. I know some of the staff use Outlook and that there are PST files on the server. How can I check if we are using the Exchange feature?

I checked process explorer and perfmon again and it does look like RAM is maxed a lot so maybe the upgrade is a good idea.



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#5
April 19, 2012 at 08:14:47
✔ Best Answer
for the processes you describe, a few excel sheets and outlook, should not be maxing 2gig of ram.

you should run some malware/spyware scans

to check is exchange is running check the services

compress old files is only one of many check boxes in disk cleanup. I have never had a problem with running compress old files on the server. Not running defrag regularly can lead to a severely fragmented NTFS and the system will simply fail to boot.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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#6
April 19, 2012 at 09:04:04
Will do. Thanks for the tips!

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