install 2 os

May 15, 2011 at 01:43:19
Specs: Windows 7
how to install win server on win 7

See More: install 2 os

Report •

#1
May 15, 2011 at 06:25:44
A server is a server & a client is a client. There is no reason for a dual boot between the two.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#2
May 15, 2011 at 09:34:43
Answer should address the question.

anisgh you certainly can install server with win7. You have a couple of options.
You can dual boot. Google has plenty of how to's
You can run a virtual host. This is the recommended way and is the least intrusive to your win7 system. Doesn't require partitioning. Both Microsoft and Vmware have free products you can use.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#3
May 15, 2011 at 10:07:43
Why would anyone dual boot a server? It doesn't make sense.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 15, 2011 at 11:45:01
Do you really have that little imagination? Someone might want to play with Windows Server whilst using Windows 7 as their day-to-day OS.

I run Windows 2008 in a VirtualBox VM. It works just fine.


Report •

#5
May 15, 2011 at 12:00:42
That still doesn't make sense. You can't connect to the server with windows 7 if they are on the same machine.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#6
May 15, 2011 at 13:34:27
Who says you want to? Maybe you want to connect from another computer, or perhaps another VM.

Report •

#7
May 15, 2011 at 14:43:10
The reason for having a server is to give all the client machines access to it. Dual booting a server is a strange concept at best.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#8
May 15, 2011 at 20:53:24
That is a very narrow definition of server client.

Lots of folks run multile VMs on the same machine to simulate a network that in my day was hodgepodged together out of spare equipment and required a lot of cables.

Thank goodness for progress.

It's all educational but does have real world implications.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#9
May 16, 2011 at 01:44:35
A major aspect of using server software is to learn how to configure and use it. A dual boot or VM setup on a single PC is ideal for this. It's also good for trying out new configurations, practising disaster recovery, a whole host of other reasons.

Dual booting Windows 7 and Windows Server makes perfect sense in such scenarios.


Report •

Ask Question