2003 servers not talking to each other

May 12, 2011 at 00:21:14
Specs: Windows 2003
Hi All,
I am new to networking but I am hoping some one out there can provide me with guidance. I work for a not-for-profit which just merged with another not-profit in a nearby city. As a result of the merger, some of the workers have swapped locations. Both locations run Microsoft 2003 servers. What needs to be done to enable the two servers “speak to each” so that employers at location A can have access to files on drives on location B and vice-versa? What are the issues involved here? Also what kind of networking experience would a person have to implement this? Thanks.
Pillarz

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#1
May 12, 2011 at 06:38:16
couple of options assuming they have office to office connectivity.

1. create a trust between the two domains

2. demote one domain to being a standalone server and then promote it to join the other domain. You will need to recreate the users lost in the domain transition but maintaining one domain is far easier than two.

minimum 4 years experience mcse preferred.

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#2
May 12, 2011 at 07:28:13
Wanderer, thank you so much. As I mentioned I am a novice to networking, how do you create connectivity between the two offices?

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#3
May 12, 2011 at 08:01:59
do these offices have internet access?

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#4
May 12, 2011 at 08:06:43
Yes.. they do.

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#5
May 12, 2011 at 08:29:11
Wanderer the two sites also belong to a mother agency (headquarters) and do access files and services from servers at HQ like email (Outlook ), databases and proprietary software. I don't know if this changes anything. Thanks.

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#6
May 13, 2011 at 08:56:17
Yep that makes a difference.

Ideally you would just make a change of the HQ router to route between the sites in addition to getting to and from HQ

What are they using at the HQ for access?
Dedicated Point to Point T1's?
Frame relay T1s?
MPLS?
VPNs over the internet?

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#7
May 13, 2011 at 11:36:41
I see. Thanks. Let me get back to you on the kind of connection at HQ.

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#8
May 17, 2011 at 10:04:56
Wanderer. I spoke too soon. There is no connection between Head Office and the two locations. They only log into the HO site for support services and documents downloads. I guess we are back to your earlier suggestion?
I am told VPN has been used to allow some users in location A access the location B server. They can create new folders , copy , cut , paste , etc on server B as necessary. However this seems to be painfully slow and only one individual of the initial 4, uses it. What would make people happy - best solution? Thanks.

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#9
May 17, 2011 at 10:10:57
Best solution would be part of a business plan. Doesn't appear anyone planned for this aspect of the company's growth.

How we are setup is all servers are at the central office and the remote sites all have Point to Point T1's connecting them to the central office. We use thin clients and Citrix [terminal services] for remote sites to connect to the central office servers.

Remote sites communicate with each other but this is a spoke and hub design not a mesh which would have site A connecting to each site and site b connecting to all sites, etc.

How many users at each location?

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#10
May 18, 2011 at 08:35:02
You are right. How IT was going to impact the merger was the last thing considered.
11 users at location A, and 6 at location B.

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