Win2k causes overheating?

Microsoft Windows 2000 server
August 3, 2009 at 13:47:08
Specs: Windows 2000
I have three identical Intel S875WP1-E boards with 2.8GHz P4 processors (512k L2, 800MHz FSB, 4x512MB DDR400). Two have Windows 2000 Server, and one has Ubuntu. All three have been visually inspected to verify that both the CPU fan and the case fans are running and dust-free. The Ubuntu machine runs consistently at < 40 C. Both Windows machines are consistently running at > 60 C (when I have them on, that is). I've backed up the numbers by simply touching the heatsinks - the Ubuntu is roughly room temperature, while both Windows machines are hot to the touch. So how is it that the two Windows boxes are so much hotter?

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#1
August 3, 2009 at 18:57:53
Swapped the Ubuntu's CPU fan and heat sink with one of the Win2k's. No change. Swapped the CPU itself. No change. Either something identically awful has happened to two of my three mainboards, or this is a software issue.

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#2
August 4, 2009 at 15:34:29
if you think it is a software issue put all OS's on the SAME system then take your measurements.

FYI just because the fans run does not mean they are running at the correct rpm. Check the mainboard stats with the manufacturer and then look at the fans rate of spin via the bios.

Not closing up the cases can also affect temp due to lack of correct airflow


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#3
August 5, 2009 at 06:21:22
I made sure to close the cases during testing. Also, to really confuse the issue, I found readings for temperature and fan speed in the BIOS. So I let one of the "bad" systems run for a while and watched that. The temp was higher than the "good" system, but not what SpeedFan was reporting - more like halfway in between. Confusing.

In other news, I've brought one of the "bad" systems home to format it and put a fresh OS on. If I find anything useful, I'll post it here.


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Related Solutions

#4
August 5, 2009 at 06:59:41
Most third party monitoring system have an option to apply an offset for that reason. The BIOS should be the most accurate readings. Read the setup files for Speed Fan to learn how to calibrate it.

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#5
August 6, 2009 at 11:37:10
Don't trust speedfan...trust the BIOS. If the hardware is basically identical but when you compare temp readings in the BIOS, one system is consistently lower than the other two, either the heatsink/fan is installed differently or a different BIOS version is installed. It's NOT a software problem.

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#6
August 9, 2009 at 16:29:03
I'm finally convinced that it's not software. I did find a BIOS page with temperature readings.

So here's where I'm at now:

System 1: Ubuntu (in a rack, and working fine) CPU 37, Board 36, Remote 27.
System 2: Win2k (on my desk, working for the moment) CPU 55, Board 33, Remote 25.

That's right - I'm getting an insanely high CPU reading on the bad system, even though the other temps are stable.

The BIOS also reads that the CPU fan's running at 7300rpm, and I can guarantee from observation that it is indeed running.

So why is my CPU temp so high? Any guesses?


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#7
August 9, 2009 at 16:50:02
The system may be dirty inside, the Heat sink may not be installed correctly or other fans in the system are not working. Check the power supply fan/s too.

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#8
August 10, 2009 at 18:57:37
Clean system, all fans working. The heat sink is clipped to the CPU with the silver goo in between. I'd switched CPU's and heat sink / fan assemblies with the "good" system, so it's definitely not the CPU, heat sink, or fan. Also, I've tested the system both closed and open. It does run marginally cooler when closed, but I'm looking for an explanation of 20 degrees of heat, not 2.

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#9
August 10, 2009 at 22:24:36
After you switched the CPU & etc did you check the BIOS temperatures on both systems again?

Is there an offset number set in the PC Health screen?

Are the power supplies all the same? Did you check the fan/s in them?


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#10
August 11, 2009 at 04:33:00
Yes, temperatures have been checked after switching, and no, there is no offset. Besides, the numbers I'm seeing are backed up by simply touching the heatsinks. The problem system is hot to the touch, and the good system isn't. Power supplies are the same, and fans are running. I haven't swapped them, but both seem to be running the same temperature (again, by touch). Also, keep in mind this is CPU temperature. Board and remote temperature are actually slightly better on the problem system (because it's not in my rack).

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#11
August 11, 2009 at 05:00:28
The only thing I can think of then is that thermal throttling may be disabled on some of the units.

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#12
August 12, 2009 at 10:02:37
"The BIOS also reads that the CPU fan's running at 7300rpm,,,"

There's your hint. Although not impossible, I've never seen a cpu size (60mm/80mm) fan run at that speed.

Usual max speeds for a 60mm fan is <5500 rpm and ~3100 rpm for a 80mm.

So, possibilities are that you have a little 50mm fan on steroids or that a BIOS update may be necessary for that motherboard.

Skip


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#13
August 12, 2009 at 11:28:43
The BIOS only has one update, and I looked at the changelog - it's nothing related to this. Also, it's in a 1U chassis. The fan is an extremely compact design. I actually (carefully!) slipped a piece of paper inside to make extra-sure it was running. The pitch of the "zip" I heard was crazy-high. So, 7300 does not seem to be out there.

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