Solved Have XP & Win2K on same drive, how can I make them dualboot?

April 10, 2012 at 00:08:37
Specs: Windows 2000, P4 2.8Ghz/1GB
I can have one OS installed so it will boot & run, would like to be able to have both of them bootable. The other installed OS will not boot & run unless I "kill" my ability to boot & run the other OS the way it is now....

See More: Have XP & Win2K on same drive, how can I make them dualboot?

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✔ Best Answer
April 23, 2012 at 20:53:48
I am not sure what to make of your #5 above because the numbers don't add up. That said, you can perform a repair installation of WinXP and that will fix the dual boot.

However, riider is correct that 2GB is much too small of a partition.



#1
April 10, 2012 at 05:37:55
You will need either 2 partitions or 2 hard drives:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306559

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/217210


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#2
April 10, 2012 at 10:38:04
Same drive but different partitions? Which OS is installed 1st?

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#3
April 10, 2012 at 21:39:12
XP was installed first (C: drive), but then I "downgraded" (don't ask) to Win2K (installed that on F: (same HD)), am now running Win2K, but am preparing to shift back up to XP, but would prefer to not lose the 2K.... would like to be able to dual-boot, (still be able to boot to 2K occasionally...) what would be required to make this possible? Would like to @ the same time if at all possible make the XP partition somehow be the "primary" in a sense, because when I had XP running, I had installed GoBack, which I really like, and when I installed Win2K, I lost GoBack, because it's on the other partiition, if I boot from the old partition (C) it comes back up again,
at least it still did last time...
C partition (XP) is a 64% full 2GB FAT partition...
F partition (2K) is a 62% FREE 100GB NTFS part...

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Related Solutions

#4
April 13, 2012 at 08:19:54
Are you willing to start from scratch? Obviously 2GB is WAY too small for XP plus it would be better to format using NTFS. Not only that, but it's generally best to have the older OS installed 1st.

What I would do is completely wipe out all partitions, then create at least 2 new ones, one for W2K & one for XP. Actually, 3 partitions would probably be better - the 3rd partition would be for data storage & would be accessible from either OS. If W2K isn't going to be used much, create a small C partition, say 10GB. The XP partition should be considerably larger, maybe 60GB? The remainder would be the storage partition.

Start by installing W2K. Once the installation is complete, boot into W2K, insert the XP disc in the drive & wait for the popup. It will ask if you want to upgrade (recommended) - do NOT do it! Instead, click advanced & direct XP to install to the 60GB partition. The dual boot configuration will be setup automatically.


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#5
April 13, 2012 at 22:35:23
any way to do it without reformatting the drive?

The 100GB drive shows up in Disk Management as 3 partitions... 120gig SATA Drv- 111.75 GB NTFS
(NO DRIVE LETTER!) - Healthy

WINXP (C:) 2GB FAT - Healthy (System) and...
100GB of 120GB Drv-WIN2K (F:)- 101.91 GB NTFS
Healthy (Boot)


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#6
April 23, 2012 at 20:53:48
✔ Best Answer
I am not sure what to make of your #5 above because the numbers don't add up. That said, you can perform a repair installation of WinXP and that will fix the dual boot.

However, riider is correct that 2GB is much too small of a partition.


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