fix/correct partition size in Windows

March 22, 2013 at 06:57:21
Specs: Windows 2000 Professional
Is there a way to manually fix/correct a Windows 2000 FAT32 partition (CHS-values/volume size) in/for Windows (or can someone point me in a direction to find a solution)?
I am trying to correct the partition values that are read/retrieved by the Windows OS.

I supposedly "successfully" converted a 152GB partition partition from NTFS to FAT32 using Partition Magic v8 (which I have successfully done before).
When Windows restarted, Windows(chkdsk, disk defrag, and windows explorer) now recognize the 152GB FAT32 partition as a 19GB FAT32 partition.
Only the Windows OS seems to have the problem.

I am assuming that a glitch in Partition Magic wrote the wrong partition information to some alternate location that the OS accesses.

Partition Doctor, Partition Magic, Partition Table Editor, and TestDisk v6.13 all correctly analyze and detect the 152GB FAT32 disk partition.
Some of the files on the drive are accessible, but many are not.

I have discovered some sector editors so I if I can find out (where and how) the partition data for (chkdsk, defrag, and explorer) is stored I can manually correct the field values.

Any help will be greatly appreciated
Please advise.
Thanks, Tracey
TestDisk 6.13, Data Recovery Utility, November 2011
Disk /dev/sdb - 160 GB / 149 GiB - CHS 19457 255 63
Current partition structure:
Partition Start End Size in sectors
1 P FAT32 LBA 0 1 1 19456 254 63 312576642 [W2KP21]
Structure: Ok.

Partition Start End Size in sectors
>D HPFS - NTFS 0 1 1 19456 254 63 312576642 [W2KP21]
NTFS found using backup sector!, 160 GB / 149 GiB

>D FAT32 LBA 0 1 1 19456 254 63 312576642 [W2KP21]
FAT32, 160 GB / 149 GiB
===========================================================================
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
===========================================================================
PowerQuest PartitionInfo 8.0 -- Windows NT/2000 Version
Disk Geometry Information for Disk 2: 19457 Cylinders, 255 Heads, 63 Sectors/Track
Info: Disk Manager is installed on this drive.
System PartSect # Boot BCyl Head Sect FS ECyl Head Sect StartSect NumSects
===========================================================================================================
W2KP21 0 0 00 0 1 1 0C 1023 254 63 63 312,576,642
Info: Begin C,H,S values were large drive placeholders.
Info: End C,H,S values were large drive placeholders.
Actual values are: 0 0 00 0 1 1 0C 19456 254 63 63 312,576,642

Partition Information for Disk 2: 152,625.3 Megabytes
Volume PartType Status Size MB PartSect # StartSect TotalSects
===========================================================================================================
D:W2KP21 FAT32 Pri 152,625.3 0 0 63 312,576,642
===========================================================================================================
Boot Record for drive D: (Drive: 2, Starting sector: 63, Type: FAT32... after conversion)
===========================================================================================================
1. Jump: EB 58 90
2. OEM Name: MSWIN4.1
3. Bytes per Sector: 512
4. Sectors per Cluster: 1
5. Reserved Sectors: 32
6. Number of FAT's: 2
7. Reserved: 0x0000
8. Reserved: 0x0000
9. Media Descriptor: 0xF8
10. Sectors per FAT: 0
11. Sectors per Track: 63 (0x3F)
12. Number of Heads: 255 (0xFF)
13. Hidden Sectors: 63 (0x3F)
14. Big Total Sectors: 312576642 (0x12A18A82)
15. Big Sectors per FAT: 2404437
16. Extended Flags: 0x0000
17. FS Version: 0
18. First Cluster of Root: 780553 (0xBE909)
19. FS Info Sector: 1
20. Backup Boot Sector: 6
21. Reserved: 000000000000000000000000
22. Drive ID: 0x80
23. Reserved for NT: 0x01
24. Extended Boot Sig: 0x29
25. Serial Number: 0x511B8C73
26. Volume Name: W2KP21
27. File System Type: FAT32
28. Boot Signature: 0xAA55

===========================================================================================================
Boot Record for drive D: (Drive: 2, Starting sector: 63, Type: NTFS... before conversion)
===========================================================================================================
1. Jump: EB 52 90
2. OEM Name: NTFS
3. Bytes per Sector: 512
4. Sectors per Cluster: 8
5. Reserved Sectors: 0
6. Number of FATs: 0
7. Root Dir Entries: 0
8. Total Sectors: 0
9. Media Descriptor: 0xF8
10. Sectors per FAT: 0
11. Sectors per Track: 63 (0x3F)
12. Number of Heads: 255 (0xFF)
13. Hidden Sectors: 63 (0x3F)
14. Total Sectors (>32MB): 0 (0x0)
15. Unused: 0x80008000
16. Total NTFS Sectors: 312576641
17. MFT Start Cluster: 4
18. MFT Mirror Start Clust: 19536040
19. Clusters per FRS: 246
20. Clusters per Index Blk: 1
21. Serial Number: 0xCE6C94C46C94A92B
22. Checksum: 0 (0x0)
23. Boot Signature: 0xAA55


See More: fix/correct partition size in Windows

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#1
March 22, 2013 at 10:37:02
How much data was on the 152GB partition when it was NTFS? Were you using the default cluster size of 4kb?

First of all it is best to type directly into the box and not copy/paste to it. Your text is spilling over, making it hard to read.

A FAT32 partition of 152GB would have a cluster size of 32kb.

Only ONE file per cluster is allowed so depending on how much data was on the NTFS partition there may be too much data to fit when using clusters that are 8 times larger, meaning only one eighth the actual capacity.

How old is your hardware. Your motherboard may not be 48 bit LBA compliant. This means you can't use hard drives larger than 127GB actual capacity. You also must have at least SP3 to use large hard drives in Win2000.

What is the total capacity of this hard drive and does it show that way in the BIOS?

It appears you have a 160GB drive which is actually 149GB+-.


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#2
March 22, 2013 at 11:36:16
How much data was on the 152GB partition when it was NTFS?
July 2012 stats:
156288320 KB total disk space.
137569612 KB in 311278 files.
100340 KB in 32187 indexes.
0 KB in bad sectors.
464880 KB in use by the system.
65536 KB occupied by the log file.
18153488 KB available on disk.
4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
39072080 total allocation units on disk.
4538372 allocation units available on disk.

The Dell GX270 BIOS show the SATA to be a 160 GB drive.
Windows 2000 Service Pack 4
Current FAT32 cluster size is 1 sector.


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#3
March 22, 2013 at 12:01:07
So then, where did you expect the overflow of data to go?

You have somehow managed to create a partition that should be allowed. A sector is only 512 bytes.

With 137GB of data and multiple folders, sub-folders and long file namesyou are no doubt maxing out the allowable files.

Look at the 2 links below. Pay special attention to the paragraph on clusters in the second link.

I think you could have possibly created a 152GB partition starting from scratch but you have too much data. Windows states you can't convert NTFS to FAT32 but must delete and recreate. Third party may try but you see the results.

Why in the world did/do you want to do this anyway. NTFS is much better for efficiency and fault protection.

If you are LUCKY, you MAY be able to reverse the process using the same program and still save all you data. I am not optimistic.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/...

http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_...


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#4
March 22, 2013 at 13:38:25
I guess things were going to good for me to stop and back up before proceeding.
Just have to start from scratch.
Thanks anyway, Tracey

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#5
March 22, 2013 at 14:00:02
Try undoing the conversion using the same program. You have nothing to lose at this point.

You could also try file recovery software if you have files that you need to recover.

Recuva should be able to recover any files not overwritten by reinstalling Windows. Recuva runs under most versions of Windows and can recover files after a quick format.

Another option would be to remove the hard drive and slave it to another system, either internally or externally. Install recuva and recover your files.

Get recuva at the link below. I am still curious WHY you wanted to have FAT32.

http://www.piriform.com/docs/recuva...


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#6
March 23, 2013 at 06:57:48
"I am still curious WHY you wanted to have FAT32"

Exactly what I was thinking while reading this thread.


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#7
March 23, 2013 at 10:59:32
re: I am still curious WHY you wanted to have FAT32.

There are times when I am doing research that I copy many data files from CDs/DVDs/HDDs to an HDD to speed up processing time and then delete them when I am done.

The draw back to this is when I want to undelete a file, the undelete program has to wade through all the deleted file entries before I can do the undelete.
I have yet to discover a program that clears deleted file entries in NTFS for Windows 2000.
??? Does anyone know of one ???

Normally I copy the partition to an alternate location then quick format the partition and copy the files back.

I must have have discovered/stumbled-across/used (some time ago) a "quick short cut": change the NTFS to FAT32 then back to NTFS.

This had worked before, but without realizing it I must have had much less than 137GB for Partition Magic to do this without any data loss.

Here is a good example how something can work fine one time (for whatever reason) then not the next.

As has always been the case, when Partition Magic 8 was finished converting the partition to FAT32, the message was something like: the conversion process has been successfully completed.

Lessons learned the hard way.
Next time I will not neglect to back-up before proceeding.
Tracey


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#8
March 23, 2013 at 11:58:39
Isn't there an undo or reverse of actions taken in PM? I think there is. The only limitation is you must complete the operations one at a time. If performing multiple operations at one time you may not be able to undo.

As far as your issue with deleting files goes, I don't see where the file system should be a factor.

When I work with files on a temporary basis I make a folder on the desktop and place the files in there.

If I am missing something then please explain better so I understand.


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#9
March 24, 2013 at 20:45:19
NTFS or FAT32 has nothing to do with file deletion. The downgrading to FAT32 was unnecessary. I suggest you change it back.

"The draw back to this is when I want to undelete a file, the undelete program has to wade through all the deleted file entries before I can do the undelete"

Why are you deleting & undeleting? And what program are you using to do it? Wouldn't it be easier to go to the Recycle Bin & just restore the deleted file?


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#10
March 28, 2013 at 06:50:54
In the interest of those that might find themselves in the same predicament (re-written):

I was not able to reverse the process because Partition Magic 8 does a partition/sector/file structure integrity test before proceeding.
The conversion of the 160GB partition from NTFS to FAT32 worked because the file structure integrity of the NTFS tested good.
Reversing the process did not work because the FAT32 tested bad: the 160 GB FAT32 partition is limited to a maximum 128 GB(131,072 MB/137,438,953,472 bytes).
Partition Magic might have been able to reverse the process if it just check for corrupted file structure.
Capacity wise the FAT32 has a file limitation of FAT28 (2^28)

Fortunately, because I had a full backup last October and was able to rescue 128 GB from the present partition, I was able recover many of the files.

Just FYI, Tracey
FWIW it is best to do a full backup periodically and backup all new and changed files on a regular basis.


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#11
March 28, 2013 at 12:54:15
Glad to hear you at least recovered some of your files. I won't preach about backups. Thanks for getting beck to us. The last post especially, may be of some use to someone in the future.

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