Solved Windows 10 without touch?

Self build / N/A
May 31, 2017 at 17:21:13
Specs: Vista Ultimate, SP2, 3.0Ghz/2Ghz
Can Windows 10 be used without a touch enabled screen? I've been looking at laptops and some have touch and some do not. Is there any advantage to having touch vs. not having touch? Also, some budget priced laptops have only 4 GB of RAM. Would Chrome run OK with 4 GB of memory? I have a desktop with 2 GB of memory and the Chrome browser runs just fine.

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✔ Best Answer
June 2, 2017 at 13:06:22
On telemetry: Microsoft has listed the minimum amount of data it will collect from your system in the most technical way possible, but at this point I just assume Microsoft knows everything I've ever plugged into my system, unplugged from my system, what programs I run, and for how long I run them. My assumptions may or may not be accurate. Further reading: https://arstechnica.com/information...

On advertising: It shows up as popups in Windows. It can be turned off for now, but they hide the setting by not calling it advertising. I'm also assuming the end game is to have as much advertising in Windows as Microsoft has in its Xbox products, which would mean a minimum of 1/4 of the screen dedicated to ads with no way to disable. People are reporting that the popups have gone away, but that's probably more just Microsoft waiting for the heat to die down than any sort of policy change: https://www.theverge.com/2017/3/17/...

If you're wondering why Microsoft is doing this, I hear they consider Windows to be a dying product, and they're going to squeeze out as much capital while they can.

I don't believe OS/X has the same . . . privacy concerns as Windows, but Macs aren't iPhones/iPads, so they're not exactly a priority for Apple these days.

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message edited by Razor2.3



#1
May 31, 2017 at 17:24:15
Forgot to mention that I am not a power user. I rarely have multiple tabs open when browsing the internet and I usually don't use more than one application at a time.

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#2
May 31, 2017 at 17:32:34
Respectively:
Yes.
Well, depends on if you like touching the screen or not.
It should handle alright, but it depends on what's going on.

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#3
May 31, 2017 at 19:21:41
Can you give me an example of what you mean by "It should handle alright, but it depends on what's going on"?

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#4
May 31, 2017 at 21:36:41
It's probably going to be pretty comparable to what you have now, assuming those specs listed in the OP are accurate. If your network's the slowest thing, you might see a slightly longer loading times, since Win10 calls home much more frequently than Win7 or Vista.

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#5
May 31, 2017 at 22:36:41
I have DSL. When you say calling home, do you mean auto updates? I usually have those turned off.

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#6
June 1, 2017 at 03:38:14
Updates now cannot be turned off. Also there's telemetry gathering and advertising in Win10 that'll eat bandwidth.

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#7
June 1, 2017 at 06:43:05
In short, it does not matter, it does not matter, get the cheapest one.
if you can 4gb ram, optional touch screen & dont forget to put an antivirus on it.
I hear Malwarebytes is a good one

Simple solutions are often the best


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#8
June 1, 2017 at 08:04:55
I don't know about the latest "Creators Update" but Windows 10 OSs below that can certainly be run with the updates switched off, although I would not necessarily recommend it. You just turn off the Windows Update Service. Mine are switched off right now and I put them on and off when required - I have reasons. In fact I operate them from a batch file so they can be switched off and on at the click of a file.

What you can't do with Win 10 Home, up to Anniversary Updates, is pick and choose updates. Things might be a little easier with the creators update installed.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
June 1, 2017 at 09:42:43
Hey Derek, I heard they've made it harder for Home users to stop updates, so when you hit Creators', let me know. The pool of people I know running Win10 home is very, very small.


EDIT: Cool, thanks.

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message edited by Razor2.3


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#10
June 1, 2017 at 11:19:04
Hey Razor

I sure will but it might be quite a while because I've not been offered it yet and when I have I will put it off for at least a week in case there are any last minute bugs. I am on Home so it will be interesting to see what they do. It has always been more difficult to manage Win 10 updates on Home than Pro. With Pro there are several fiddles to delay Win updates. Somehow I doubt they will be able to stop you disabling a service though but you never know.

I'll save myself a reminder to PM you.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#11
June 2, 2017 at 12:18:05
What is meant by telemetry gathering in Windows 10? I was not aware there is advertising. Can't that be turned off? Is the advertising concentrated in Edge or through out the OS. I was not aware of these two things. Do Macs have these things also?

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#12
June 2, 2017 at 12:25:36
Re #11

It's mainly usage information - claimed to help MS with the system. Possibly there is some over reacting to it but if you go to the settings cog then Privacy (in startup) you can prevent a lot of it. Check all settings to ensure they are to your liking.

No idea about Mac's.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#13
June 2, 2017 at 13:06:22
✔ Best Answer
On telemetry: Microsoft has listed the minimum amount of data it will collect from your system in the most technical way possible, but at this point I just assume Microsoft knows everything I've ever plugged into my system, unplugged from my system, what programs I run, and for how long I run them. My assumptions may or may not be accurate. Further reading: https://arstechnica.com/information...

On advertising: It shows up as popups in Windows. It can be turned off for now, but they hide the setting by not calling it advertising. I'm also assuming the end game is to have as much advertising in Windows as Microsoft has in its Xbox products, which would mean a minimum of 1/4 of the screen dedicated to ads with no way to disable. People are reporting that the popups have gone away, but that's probably more just Microsoft waiting for the heat to die down than any sort of policy change: https://www.theverge.com/2017/3/17/...

If you're wondering why Microsoft is doing this, I hear they consider Windows to be a dying product, and they're going to squeeze out as much capital while they can.

I don't believe OS/X has the same . . . privacy concerns as Windows, but Macs aren't iPhones/iPads, so they're not exactly a priority for Apple these days.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

message edited by Razor2.3


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