Why is DVD burner ignoring video size in Windows 10?

October 13, 2016 at 20:00:15
Specs: Windows 64
Of course, Windows 10. regardless of which software program I use (many for years), every DVD comes out the same format, with the picture shrunk and black bars all the way around. Not an issue with the software, as the internal "screens" of the programs show correct aspect. Also, original videos play correctly in VLC and WMP. So, it must be W10 issue. HELP!

See More: Why is DVD burner ignoring video size in Windows 10?

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#1
October 13, 2016 at 23:25:53
The standard resolution of DVDs is considerably lower than HD, or the resolution of most computer monitors. For HD resolution you need to use BluRay.

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#2
October 14, 2016 at 07:23:53
Prior to installing W10, I never had this issue. I'm not burning BluRay; however, it is possible to backup BluRay on standard DVD. The resolution may not be HD; but the video itself is fine. The problem is that with W10 I cannot get ANY video - HD or not - to burn a normal size: every attempt is essentially a postcard sized picture in the middle of the screen.

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#3
October 14, 2016 at 07:54:40
Please let us have snap showing the black bars you mentioned. It can be uploaded on here for free:
http://www.zippyshare.com/
Just let us know the web address (URL) they give you and we will be able to view it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
October 14, 2016 at 22:03:46
http://www92.zippyshare.com/v/UkrpM...
http://www92.zippyshare.com/v/x8Lnp...

The first is the "boxed" video of a burned DVD; the second is the appearance of the original disc video. And this is the result of every attempt to burn ANY disc of ANY video.

As I said, I am no noob when it comes to this process and have used a number of different converters, burners, etc., and have NEVER had this issue until Microsoft decided to shove W10 down my throat.

Any suggestions as to how to fix/bypass/destroy this issue are greatly appreciated.


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#5
October 15, 2016 at 04:06:34
OK thanks. Seems that the "before and after" are both the correct aspect ratio (width to height) but the burnt copy has somehow produced small files, hence a small screen. In the first link the lack of width appears to be the dictating factor.

Very weird. Can you tell me exactly what you are doing? Are you copying a normal DVD or are you working on video files, such as avi, mp4 or whatever? Are you producing a DVD (with vob files etc) or are you producing video files on a DVD data disc? Also let me know what software you are using just in case I happen to have it onboard and I can compare notes.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
October 15, 2016 at 17:09:46
Hey Derek,
Thanks for the reply. I have both copied normal DVD and used video files of various types: avi, mp4, mkv, etc. Have tried converting/burning using WinX DVD Author and DVDVideosoft Vid-to-DVD/DVD Burner. Since installing Win10, I haven't installed another programs, but I have used these consistently through Vista and Win7. First converting to VOB then burning to disc.

Chris


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#7
October 15, 2016 at 17:22:23
I find it hard to imagine what Win10 would have done to cause this but note what you say. No clever ideas at present but it still seems to me that something is causing the file sizes to reduce. I can see plenty of reasons why this might happen during conversion but have no idea how this could happen when doing a straight software DVD copy without some intermediate conversion.

About all I can say is look to see if you can opt for larger files somehow or higher quality. Otherwise lets hope our discussions might help someone else who comes along with fresh ideas.

In the unlikely event that something useful comes to mind I'll be straight back.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#8
October 16, 2016 at 00:52:04
I've authored several DVD's with Windows 10 as the operating system and they all have turned out fine. I've used both Nero and Adobe Premiere to create video DVD's. The version of Windows has nothing to do with it other than perhaps some sort of compatibility issue with the software you are using to author the DVD.

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#9
October 16, 2016 at 20:05:15
That was my thought at first as well. But after reading tons of negative reviews of Windows 10 and the problems it caused with lots and lots of other people's DVD players and drives etc., it seemed as though it might be the culprit. Like I said above, not a single setting was changed between running Windows 7 and now Windows 10, with the resulting problem.

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#10
October 16, 2016 at 20:23:32
Are the authoring/burning programs you use compatible with Windows 10? Do they specificaly,say they are?

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#11
October 18, 2016 at 13:02:58
Yes. Just verified that every program I have attempted to use is Windows 10 compatible. Latest is Wondershare Dvd Creator, with the same issues:

I play the original in the preview window and it runs edge to edge, letter-boxed above and below. Then, go through menu selection, etc., and "preview" the burned DVD and the picture is again a postcard, black bars all around.

I have checked and rechecked menu and preference settings, ran conversion with different settings, etc., the the result is the same every time.

Just absolutely bizarre.


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#12
October 18, 2016 at 13:09:15
Have you browsed both discs to see if there is a difference in the file sizes?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#13
October 18, 2016 at 16:43:17
To answer the file size question:

Latest test: needed to burn a new DVD to replace one damaged by the dog. Backup file on hard drive was a 700 MB mp4. After running through WinX DVD Author (for Windows 10), the process created two VOB files, one 1.05 GB, the second at just over 600 MB.

Ran VOB file through WM Player and VLC. Both programs presented the smaller visual image, boxed all around as discussed above.

However, in VLC, if I adjusted the Video, Crop, and set to 2.39:1, the visual image then is the same as the original file.

Again, never had to do any of this before Windows 10. Bizarre, huh?


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#14
October 18, 2016 at 16:54:28
The box all round is (presumably) because the file or picture size is too small to fill the screen. Aspect ratio is normally set to preserve the original unless there is some reason you want to stretch or compress the picture horizontally or vertically.

Yes, very weird. No idea from afar. Whether "hands on" would tell me something goodness knows - probably not from what you've said.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#15
October 19, 2016 at 06:26:49
Have you tried playing the DVD in a regular DVD player connected to a TV? It would be helpful to know if this is a playback issue with your computer or an encoding issue.

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#16
October 19, 2016 at 08:34:52
Good thought from THX 1138.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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