Solved why does windows 10 do a slow ChkDsk every start up?

December 10, 2017 at 05:28:39
Specs: Windows 10
Windows W performs a slow disc check on every start up, sticking at "drive (E:): 100% complete" for over W minutes and longer. Drive E is a W MG flash-drive back-up of my personal documents in an USB port. I have to either push any key within W seconds (?) to sidestep the disc check before the Drive E throttle-point (if i am at the keyboard within time ...), or reboot the computer completely to get past the Drive E: throttle-point. Can i disable this disc check at start up, what are the dangers of doing this??

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#1
December 10, 2017 at 08:59:03
Take a look at this:
http://www.thewindowsclub.com/check...

But tread lightly if you are uncomfortable messing around with the registry.


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#2
December 10, 2017 at 10:03:42
✔ Best Answer
What are all these W's in your post?

What happens if you remove the flash drive - it might be faulty?

Perhaps the flash drive is corrupted. Save the files somewhere then format it and put the files back on it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
December 10, 2017 at 14:09:18
I suspect W = 10

Regards

message edited by Ewen


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#4
December 11, 2017 at 04:09:26
Yes, i did used a spellcheck with predictable results if they are presumed correct without re-reading .... sorry!!

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#5
December 11, 2017 at 05:05:38
You are correct, I used the spellcheck option without re-reading the result - beginners mistake with often amusing, sometimes embarrassing results!!

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#6
December 11, 2017 at 05:15:51
thanks for this retsgtmkb. The issue seems to be resolving, the buffer is circling for shorter and shorter periods on start up, with the total block at the E drive check actually not occurring not occurring. I was interested in following the suggestion of changing the value in the registry, but could not actually even find the registry - maybe just as well ....

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#7
December 11, 2017 at 05:44:10
If you really want to know, to get to the registry editor:

Press the Windows key and D together to get the Run box.
In there you type regedit and hit Enter key.

You will see a structure with paths rather similar to files and folders.

All this is in Google anyhow but beware of the dragons - don't make mistakes in there.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
December 11, 2017 at 10:31:07
I've noted this, thanks Derek, for just in case ... but not being a St George suggest not rushing in there at this stage!! J

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#9
December 11, 2017 at 20:52:16
As you should tread carefully in there. Errors of a number, letter, space, etc. can have serious consequences. Back up the registry before making changes. Maybe even enable system restore in Windows 10 (not active by default) so you have another option to roll things back to.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
December 12, 2017 at 05:45:07
It's a good idea to keep system restore activated anyhow. It can be very handy if things go wonky.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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