Why does the monitor go out

March 15, 2017 at 12:55:57
Specs: Windows 10
monitor, turns on then goes out. green light stays on. switch off and on comes on 3seconds then goes out

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#1
March 15, 2017 at 12:58:08
Can use the off and on switch, but monitor wont stat on more than 3 seconds'


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#2
March 15, 2017 at 13:14:48
The computer has to send a video signal to the monitor. If there's no signal, there's nothing to display.

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#3
March 15, 2017 at 13:34:17
with the monitor connected to your computer - when you power up the computer (ensure the monitor is switched on first) do you see "anything" (even if only briefly) on the screen?

Can you connect the monitor to another working computer and see f the monitor does the same thing there?

And per chance can you borrow another known to be good monitor and connect that to your computer?

The two above tests are an effort to discover if the problem is within the monitor - or the computer...

Also do you have another cable to connect the monitor to your computer (presuming your monitor doesn't have a permanently attached cable...; and thus rule out (or in) the monitor cable...?


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Related Solutions

#4
March 15, 2017 at 13:45:10
When there is no signal the monitor usually shows a message to that effect so it sounds like a monitor fault. However, best way is to prove it with one of the two methods trvlr suggested in #3.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
March 15, 2017 at 14:18:20
No it's the Monitor, tried it on other computers, same thing, No display unless I turn on the of and on switch, something inside the monitor,!!

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#6
March 15, 2017 at 14:54:59
Sounds like there's a fault with the electronics. Unfortunately you can't get spares and they are not really repairable.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
March 15, 2017 at 15:10:40
Typically failing (leaking) elctrolytic capacitors/condensers can give this fault. The power supply will have a few... and likely one or two elsewhere in the rest of the circuit too.

Switching on/off once or twice allows volts to heat up and seal the leak briefly; then the leak starts again... and so it goes on...

Unless you're a dab hand at servicing monitors (and tv sets) it will likely cost you more to repair than to replace it.


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