Solved virtual Windows7 to install 32bit AutoCad 2014 on Windows10

Custom built pc / Ga-z97x-ud3h
February 2, 2018 at 13:27:20
Specs: Windows 7 Pro 64bit, G-Skill 16GB (4x4) DDR3 2133
My daughter has used AutoCad 2014 32bit on her older Windows 7 64bit laptop so we were confused that the program will not install on her newer Windows 10 64bit laptop. The installer says it cannot install 32bit version on 64bit machine. Since there was never a problem installing it on the Windows 7 machine I tried compatibility on the installer back to Windows 7 and even XP but they also failed. I cannot download the 64bit version because the copy she was given has the activation inbedded in the install. I now think the only way she will be able to continue using this software is to run it in a virtual machine with Window 7 or XP installed on it.
Please explain what this entails, what program (Free) to get/use (recommended), and any difficulties installing this or using it. Also is the files generated by the program within the virtual machine saved to normal space on the hard drive or is it a completely separate area or partition needed/used. As well as any difficulties switching back and forth between this program and other software on the computer.
It is on an Asus laptop with distinct NVidia graphics, 16GB RAM, Intel Quad (recent generation), 1TB HD so specs are no problem running the software.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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✔ Best Answer
February 5, 2018 at 17:52:18
If you have Win10 Pro, you can go with Hyper-V. It should be the most seamless experience, but I haven't played with it: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/vi...

At home, I use VirtualBox. https://www.virtualbox.org/ It's fairly straight forward, but you'll have to download the VirtualBox Extension Pack separately.

Obviously, you'll still need a valid Win7/XP license to legally run it in a VM.

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#1
February 2, 2018 at 20:32:14
The only reason I can think of why it wouldn't run is perhaps there are some 16 bit pieces of code in the program. As I'm sure you are well aware of, a 32 bit program should have no problem running on a 64 bit platform.

That being said, there may be more challenges ahead trying it on a virtual machine. Im almost wondering if it would be less of a headache finding an old 32 bit computer (Good Will) or scrounging of parts to build you own and running it on that.


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#2
February 2, 2018 at 21:45:29
The strange thing is that it runs well on her older Windows 7 64bit laptop but will not install at all on the newer Windows 10 laptop. She got the newer laptop to be lighter and easier to carry around being more powerful and more than 2 1/2 Lbs lighter and nearly 1/3 the thickness. AutoDesk says that the 2014 version does not support Windows 10, Using the compatibility setting to W7 or XP does nothing to allow the installer to install it. I found a product called Longbow that supposedly can modify first the installer and then the program to make it work but it is not a free program. I guess if I was sure it would work it might be worth the $80. to purchase it but cannot be completely sure if and how it will work. Apparently the installer is designed not to install on later operating systems so you need to purchase the newer program. Frustrating.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
February 3, 2018 at 07:18:27
Win 10 isn't specified for that package:
https://knowledge.autodesk.com/supp...

Although most things that run on Win 8 will run on Win 10, maybe with all the feature updates to Win 10 (which I regard as almost like new OSs) it is no longer suitable.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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Related Solutions

#4
February 5, 2018 at 05:25:12
OK....
Any suggestions on using a virtual machine though?
Anyone have experience or preference on options?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
February 5, 2018 at 17:52:18
✔ Best Answer
If you have Win10 Pro, you can go with Hyper-V. It should be the most seamless experience, but I haven't played with it: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/vi...

At home, I use VirtualBox. https://www.virtualbox.org/ It's fairly straight forward, but you'll have to download the VirtualBox Extension Pack separately.

Obviously, you'll still need a valid Win7/XP license to legally run it in a VM.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#6
February 5, 2018 at 20:42:56
"Obviously, you'll still need a valid Win7/XP license to legally run it in a VM. "
I thought that a few years ago I read somewhere that since you were running a fully licensed operating system the OS in the virtual machine did not need a license. Are you sure that it is true that I need to purchase a new copy or license? This will not change my mind that we need to do this but it will add to the cost of it so I want to make sure.

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#7
February 5, 2018 at 21:01:40
Pretty sure, yeah. Documentation's here, if you want to go through it yourself: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/lic...

Are you perhaps thinking of Win7's XP mode? It was WinXP in a VM, available for free for Win7 Pro users, but it was a one time thing. Basically something of a marketing gimmick to get businesses to move past XP. "Your business critical app refuses to run on Vista or this prototype Win7? Fine, we'll throw in WinXP in a VM for you. Now will you upgrade to Win7?"

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#8
February 5, 2018 at 21:26:25
Planning on running Windows 7 within a VM on a Windows 10 host. Windows XP would also work I guess but the original program did run on Windows 7 before so it should be fine there.

I have been looking online and there is some talk about it needing to be a retail license and not an OEM license. Do you know if this is true and does it include retail purchase of an OEM license or just OEM's that come with machines? If I need a retail license then that effectively doubles the cost of doing this...

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#9
February 6, 2018 at 01:30:22
Autodesk recommends for:

Virtualization

Citrix® XenApp™ 6.5 FP1
Citrix® XenDesktop™ 5.6

But anyways could it be that the application needs one of those .NET framework (or MSV distributable 2005/8/10/12/15)packets & is not telling you during installation?

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#10
February 6, 2018 at 12:06:15
OEM licenses are tied to hardware, and a VM has no hardware to be tied to, so I'd suspect you couldn't use an OEM license. I don't have anything backing up that claim, and I come from enterprise environments, so I'm not claiming expertise here.

Also, does Autodesk really list Xen* as virtualization solutions? Because they're not. They're third party remote desktop replacements. I guess it's good to know Autodesk supports a multi-user environment, but most programs do.

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#11
February 6, 2018 at 20:51:15
Thank you Razor2.3 I have been seeing the retail or multi-user or enterprise reference online now that I have been looking for it and it appears to be the requirement. This adds the cost of doing this, it will take a lot of thinking on which way to go from here. Thank you again.

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