Unknown device in Device Manager

December 7, 2016 at 12:50:24
Specs: several
Brand-new HP laptop, Windows 10.

Under "Other devices" is an entry for "Unknown device" which
showed up in the last day or two. It *may* have appeared when
I inserted a USB flash memory pen drive for the first time.
(8 GB, also HP brand as it happens.) After an initial fleeting
error message that was onscreen for only half a second, the
drive worked fine. I didn't try to write to it, but it read with no
problem in File Explorer. I dismounted it before removing it.

Device Manager says "Location: PCI bus 0, device 26, function 0".
and "Physical Device Object Name: NTPNP_PCI0005". The first
hit on Google for the latter implies that is the Ethernet controller,
but none of the other hits say "Ethernet", so I don't really have any
idea what this thing is. (I haven't done *anything* with the Ethernet
port since I set eyes on the box the computer came in.)

Can I somehow delete the entry in Device Manager and see if it
goes away and stays gone?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#1
December 7, 2016 at 14:08:18
Do the uninstall in Device Manager (right click). If it is genuine it will re-instate the required software when you restart the computer. If not it could be a fleeting glitch.

As you probably know, Uninstall from Device Manager just "unhitches" the software from the device, setting it up again if "New Hardware is found".

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
December 8, 2016 at 00:03:56
Something my brain might know, but doesn't necessarily tell me
when I need the information.

Uninstalled. Unknown device disappeared from Device Manager.
Restarted computer. Checking Device Manager again ... and ...
Huh. Something new under "Other devices". This one has a name:
"PCI Encryption/Decryption Controller".

Could I have caused this by disabling some service or task that
involves encryption/decryption? I disabled a number of services,
but I don't see any that I disabled in the last two days that relate
to encryption. SNMP Trap?? Superfetch?? Windows Biometric
Service?? I suppose that last involves incryption, but can't imagine
how it could be started. It was disabled on my Windows 7 desktop
without any problem.

Huh. I see a tab on the dialog for this device which I didn't notice
before: "Events". It has a list of events -- Three on the day Windows
was installed, one a few minutes ago when I deleted it, and two when
I restarted Windows. The first three are:

Device migrated
Device configured (oem0.inf)
Device started (TXEIx64)

Other info suggests that this device probably is the same as the one
that previously was "unknown".

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#3
December 8, 2016 at 05:38:42
I don't think disabling services had any bearing on this.

Seems like the driver got messed up and the procedure set it back up correctly, hence the named device now instead of the unknown device. It's often tricky to say just what caused things of this nature.

A couple of points on disabling services. Seems like you are noting which services have changed which is a good idea. Sometimes at a later date something you then want to do doesn't work and many happy hours can go by before you realise a service was disabled way back.

Is there some good reason you disabled Superfetch? It is there to make programs start more quickly. Contrary to what you sometimes read on bad websites it does not take up any resources except the very first time it associates itself with a program. What it does is note the various steps so that the program starts more quickly next time. The files are automatically pruned.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#4
December 8, 2016 at 10:53:37
I'm trying to discover what causes the enormous amount of
disk access on a completely fresh install of Windows even
when I'm not doing anything. Way back on my first Windows
computer running Windows 95, I found that software which
came with the printer was continuously listening for messages
and therefore somehow causing the HDD light to flash every
second. That software did nothing useful, I uninstalled it, and
the flashing stopped. I was never able to stop the flashing on
later versions of Windows, even without any printer software.
The new laptop I just got has actual disk access going on all
the time. I can hear it as well as see the light. Not literally
*all* the time, but an awful lot. I've been watching it a bit in
Resource Monitor, but I haven't learned what all those cryptic
process names are yet, so I can't tell what's happening. I'm
pretty sure a big chunk of it is various programs trying to call
home via the Internet, failing to connect, and recording the
failures in a hundred different log files, not one of which will
ever be put to good use.

The only things I've done in the last few days are disable tasks
and services I think I can do without, and re-enable the setting
in BIOS which turned off Bluetooth (which I don't need) so that
I can use the USB port and memory card reader which are
somehow tied to it. That worked.

I haven't studied the details of how Prefetch and Superfetch
work, but it seemed likely that they could be responsible for a
good deal of the disk thrashing, and I doubt they'd cut more
than a couple of seconds off the loading time.

OK. I got around to Googling the device name that came up
last time ("PCI Encryption/Decryption Controller"), and found
immediately that it means I need the Intel Trusted Execution
Engine driver. Uninstalling the Intel Trusted Execution Engine
was in fact one of the last things I did before I noticed the
problem in Device Manager. It looked to me like its purpose
might be to support the TPM, which I turned off in BIOS, and
then some website that I only glanced at said it could cause
problems, so that was enough to prompt me to uninstall it.
I hope I can figure out how to get it back. I also uninstalled
Intel Security Assist at the same time. It looked like they
worked together.

I looked through the sheaf of pages where I'm keeping track
of changes to services, and the two pages for disabled tasks,
but didn't think to look at the page of programs I uninstalled.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
December 8, 2016 at 12:24:17
Good to hear you've found the reason for the PCI thingy, whatever.

Maybe indexing is one of the things that is keeping your HD busy. If so it should eventually subside.

I assume you've been through all the settings to prevent MS phoning home etc. This sort of thing:
https://www.secpoint.com/how-to-pre...

I don't happen to bother with Cortana, Cloud storage and so forth. I haven't got a Microsoft Account (only a local one) and most things still work to my liking.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#6
December 8, 2016 at 13:07:39
I turned off indexing. :) If I'm going to leave it off, though, I'll
need to learn how to limit what is searched. Maybe part of the
reason searches seem to take so long is that this brand-new
laptop has a slower CPU than my 2010 desktop had.

Wow! I'm surprised at how similarly we are doing things.
I'm still discovering more programs that want to phone home.
It took several days to go all the way through the services list,
with some items better shut off in Task Scheduler or uninstalled.
The last thing I uninstalled, after the Intel items, was Office 365.
I didn't see any way to install Windows 10 without the bloatware.
The laptop also came with a subscription to a downloadable
alternative to Office. I'll look into that later. I can imagine some
business advantages (to Microsoft) of software that has to
connect to the Internet to work. I can't imagine any technical
advantages, and certainly can't imagine any advantages to me.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#7
December 8, 2016 at 13:38:58
The main things that slow you down (apart from malware) are background programs that are running. Programs that just "exist" take up space but should not affect performance unless they are up to something.

I assume you've checked to see what is running in Task Manager > Startup.

Also that you do not have more than one virus checker working in real time (including MS Windows Defender).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
December 8, 2016 at 17:04:48
So far I have not installed *any* program and have not
connected to the Internet (or any other net) at all. The first
time I powered on the computer I went into the BIOS and
temporarily disabled WiFi (as well as Bluetooth) so that
Windows would not be able to connect once it finished
installing itself.

Even after uninstalling a chunk of the bloatware (mostly
by HP, all of it wanting to connect) and disabling an awful
lot of tasks and services, there still is a confusingly huge
array of things running. For example, although I turned
off Cortana, it still shows up in Task Manager as taking
up 34.2 MB.

I know the "Intel Trusted Execution Engine" is stored
somewhere in the Recovery Partition of this HP laptop,
but I have no idea how to get it out and re-install it.
Any suggestions?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#9
December 8, 2016 at 17:46:01
Yep, Cortana does use a small amount of RAM even when disabled. As I recall it that entry is necessary for the ordinary manual search to function. I believe there is a way to dive in and rip out Cortana totally but feel that would be a bit risky.

Yep I have an HP and that shoved a load of bloatware in too. Applies to most OEMs.

Don't know much about Trusted Execution Engine but from this it seemed like something I would leave in place (presumably applies to Win 10 too):
http://www.shouldiremoveit.com/Inte...
Maybe someone else will pipe up about this.

EDIT:
As you have disabled internet there might be some activity due to Windows attempting to get updates and Windows Defender too. Events might give you some clues but there are often plenty to wade through - even more if you have disabled services etc.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#10
December 9, 2016 at 00:30:07
When I tell Device Manager to look for a new driver in the
Recovery Partition, it very quickly tells me that it didn't find one.
So quickly that I'm not convinced it really looked. But even if it
did look, I question whether it would be able to identify the
"Intel Trusted Execution Engine" as what it needs, since it
isn't actually a driver.

Alternatively, can I just make the "device" vanish? Is the
"device" identified as "PCI Encryption/Decryption Controller"
actually the Trusted Platform Module? Or what? As I said,
I already have the TPM shut off and hidden in the BIOS, and
don't expect to need to use it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
December 9, 2016 at 09:06:19
I would hazard a guess that the entry should vanish if you uninstall it from Device Manager. My reasoning is that as you have disabled TPM in BIOS then Windows will not find new Hardware. I might be proved wrong.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
December 9, 2016 at 14:13:49
Try Tweaking.com
http://www.tweaking.com/content/pag...
I can repair all kinds or system issues with Windows. I would be surprised if it could not correct the issue you have now.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
December 10, 2016 at 10:19:22
I uninstalled the "PCI Encryption/Decryption Controller" twice.
The entry in DM returned both times when I re-booted.

I just read that "Intel Trusted Execution Engine" is required for
Secure Boot. The first time I started the computer, I disabled
Secure Boot in BIOS, but at some later time I re-enabled it.
Just now I re-disabled it, hoping it would make the problem
device disappear, but it still shows in Device Manager.

Now I've downloaded a copy of "Intel Trusted Execution Engine"
to install...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#14
December 10, 2016 at 11:39:33
That appears to have done it. The "Other devices" category in
Device Manager is no longer there.

So I'm back to having some Intel software installed that I probably
don't want. Maybe if I'm more selective about what I disable...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#15
December 10, 2016 at 21:55:50
Jeff,
I generally leave MS and Intel stuff alone when disabling or uninstalling, I feel it safer. Certainly Google to find out if the process is necessary since someone out there probably already made that same mistake and may save you a lot of trouble if you look first.
If you can, choose a best answer to it is marked as solved.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
December 11, 2016 at 04:00:19
I'm mainly disabling things that access the disk drive for no good
reason or try to call home, which some MS and Intel processes do.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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