Solved Unallocated section on my hard-drive C:

Gigabyte / Ga-78lmt-s2p
September 20, 2018 at 05:39:40
Specs: Windows 10, 8gig
I have used a 6 month old system back-up to restore my computer after a major stuff-up. I noticse that my machine was extremely slow after the restore so I ran a partition manager and the result is shown here <img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v504/ewen/ScreenSave_zpstodnbpyz.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo ScreenSave_zpstodnbpyz.jpg"/>
Due to monumental stuff-up on my PC I needed to restore my system with a 6 month old backup on restart i noted a distinct slow down of the PC. I ran a Partition wizard and I have posted a link to a graphic of the result.

Unhappily my print-screen function seems to have suffered so the picture is taken with my phone. What concerns me is the 278.2gig un-allocated space on the right of the screen... surely this should be in use somewhere and could this be the cause of a slow computer?

How do I fix this problem (if possible)

All advice will be gratefully received.

Regards


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✔ Best Answer
September 21, 2018 at 00:38:53
I'd guess that you originally had a D: drive also and that the System Restore has just restored the C: drive. You can't add this space the C: drive, but you can create a new volume with the space and call it D:.


#1
September 20, 2018 at 07:18:32
Please explain what a "monumental stuff-up" is & why it couldn't be fixed without using an old backup.

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#2
September 20, 2018 at 07:27:08
I am assuming this computer was factory configured. The unallocated space on the hard disk should NOT affect the performance of the system.

Post some additional information, such as model, type, operations system version, and the problem that caused you to resort to a 6 month old restore file. Also, did you afterward, run system update, assuming this is a Windows based computer?


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#3
September 20, 2018 at 16:41:37
Riider, in this case I was unable to boot my machine at all. I went through all the suggestions provided by the "ever helpful" MS Team all to no avail I reached a stage of continuous booting with the ultimate message that "the computer cannot be repaired". I don't have the knowledge to go into long technical procedures so I used the one technique that always works... "restore". Unfortunately the PC in question has not been used since February hence old backup.

To reply to OtheHill, the computer is a rather old Asus F502C running Win10, and yes I did run a system update afterwards and the machine is now back to it's old self. My question therefore is how I have ended up with so much un-allocated space and how to go about reclaiming it and converting it to usable space or how it can be added to the 185gig OS C: in the partition table.

Regards


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#4
September 21, 2018 at 00:38:53
✔ Best Answer
I'd guess that you originally had a D: drive also and that the System Restore has just restored the C: drive. You can't add this space the C: drive, but you can create a new volume with the space and call it D:.

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#5
September 21, 2018 at 07:57:40
My guess is that you have had that unallocated space for some time and just didn't realize it. I don't believe you can combine the unallocated space to the C: partition using MS tools. I think it is possible using third party utilities. If it were me I would just create another partition using all available unallocated space. At that time you should be able to name that partition if you wish to. Sometimes handy to do that so as not to confuse which partition is which.

I install programs and music on a separate partition because when performing routine backups you don't need to do them on that type of partition as often, if at all. The backup will take less time too.

Use Disk Management to create and format that space.


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#6
September 22, 2018 at 07:06:37
Thank you OtheHill I have followed the advice from ijack and yourself and I think your diagnosis is spot on. All I need to do now is find the combination utility... hello Google!

I thank you all for your input.

Regards


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#7
September 23, 2018 at 14:40:43
See this added input from Ewen on here:
https://www.computing.net/answers/w...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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