Reset Bios to Default Settings and Now Windows Wont Boot.

February 7, 2018 at 11:49:37
Specs: Windows 7, 12
So yesterday I got a new fan for my desktop computer. I installed and connected power and it worked fine but I felt it was too noisy and i wanted to lower the fan speed so i went into BIOS.
When I was in BIOS for some dumb reason I decided to reset settings to default.

When I Saved and Exit I got the following message:

"The boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessible"

I cannot log into Windows now and I even checked the boot sequence and I do see the the correct boot order is in place. My Intel SSD is showing as first and DVDRW second...Although I dont see the other harddrives I have I dont think it is relevant since Windows is only on the SSD...

Do you guys think its a setting in BIOS that is not allowing me to boot into Windows? What should I do I literally have no idea what it can be that is not allowing me to get in... Thank you in advance!


See More: Reset Bios to Default Settings and Now Windows Wont Boot.

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#1
February 7, 2018 at 12:52:22
Try to switch BIOS type to UEFI in the BIOS settings.

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#2
February 7, 2018 at 13:12:46
Hi Paulsep

Do you mean the Harddrive type or Bios type? Just want to be sure because I am not so familiar with BIOS...but I will look for that and get back to you.


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#3
February 7, 2018 at 13:53:16
"but I will look for that and get back to you"
If unable to find, exact model of comp or motherboard will help.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 7, 2018 at 14:44:38
Post the make/model of your motherboard so one of us can look at the BIOS chapter in the manual.

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#5
February 7, 2018 at 15:18:06
Motherboard is Asus P8Z77-v
Bios version is 1616

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#6
February 7, 2018 at 15:54:38
Chapter 3 in your Motherboard manual ( which is in the CD that came with the comp ) covers your settings.
https://i.imgur.com/TLkuFlH.gif

message edited by Johnw


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#7
February 7, 2018 at 16:04:25
OK so I found it under Boot>CSM (compatibility support module)
now I am not sure which settings to choose...


Launch CSM is Enabled (options are that, Auto, Disabled)

Boot Device Control is on UEFI and Legacy OpROM (choices are that, Legacy OPROM ONLY and UEFI ONLY)

Boot from Network Devices is on Legacy OpRom first (choices are that, UEFI driver first, and Ignore)

Boot from storage devices is on BOTH UEFI first (choices are that, Both Legacy oprom first, legacy oprom fist, uefi driver first, ignore)

Boot from PCIe.PCI expansion devices its on Legacy OPROM First, (choices are that one, and UEFI driver first)

message edited by nadizo123


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#8
February 7, 2018 at 16:07:37
Do you have the manual?

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#9
February 7, 2018 at 16:22:19
Yea I have it online.. please see edited post prior to this one. I have both UEFI and Legacy enabled..still no luck

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#10
February 7, 2018 at 16:26:49
"Launch CSM is Enabled (options are that, Auto, Disabled)"
Usually, once CSM is enabled, it will disable UEFI.
So try disabling it.

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#11
February 7, 2018 at 16:28:18
Boot from PCIe.PCI expansion devices its on Legacy OPROM First, (choices are that one, and UEFI driver first)"
UEFI driver first.

When Windows was installed, were there more than one hard drive (your SSD drive) installed? If so then your boot sector maybe on another drive other than your SSD drive. In order to make it work you would also need to enable boot on the other drives or do a start up repair from the install disk.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
February 7, 2018 at 16:28:29
Still not booting to windows

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#13
February 7, 2018 at 16:29:44
Should I format before I throw a fit of rage? Crazy how computers are still stupid in 2018 and cant figure out for themselves what they need to properly boot...

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#14
February 7, 2018 at 16:36:22
Did you read Fingers post?

"Should I format before I throw a fit of rage?"
It appears at the stage, the problem is with the bios settings, so that won't help.

Try disabling Fast Boot.

message edited by Johnw


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#15
February 7, 2018 at 16:43:45
I did try that..So you telling me that even formatting wont help me at this point?

Should I speak to ASUS?

message edited by nadizo123


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#16
February 7, 2018 at 16:48:44

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#17
February 7, 2018 at 17:05:09
tried clearing cmos by removing battery and putting it back in...

didn't work

I spoke to Asus they were pretty much no help...told me I needed to downgrade windows to 7 because there was a problem with some windows 10 patch...total BS...then I told them I cant even get to windows so how exactly would I downgrade then they told me to update bios...not much help from them :(


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#18
February 7, 2018 at 17:10:40
"When I was in BIOS for some dumb reason I decided to reset settings to default"
You should have used F5.
Did you?

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#19
February 7, 2018 at 17:30:02
"So you telling me that even formatting wont help me at this point?"
Until you get the bios sorted out, nothing is going to help.

Another thing to try, take the cmos battery out, leave it out a couple of hours, refit & then try F5.


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#20
February 7, 2018 at 17:41:54
Using search in the manual, read up on AHCI & SSD.

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#21
February 7, 2018 at 17:48:25
A piece of hardware may be interfering with the normal boot process of Windows. Try unplugging all devices from your computer, including:

Printers
Scanners
Media Card Readers
Small Media cradles (iPod, PDA, MP3 player, etc.)
Digital Cameras and Video Recorders
USB storage devices
CDs or DVDs from all optical drives

The only devices you should leave attached to your computer are your monitor, mouse and keyboard, if the computer is a desktop.

Once this is completed, do A Proper Power Reset.
Doing proper power reset is easy. It isn't the same as simply shutting down your machine.

A proper power reset means draining all the electricity out of the system.
This will properly reset the hardware and also clear volatile memory, it also helps since Windows will be restarted after, clearing out any memory leaks, not enough system resources or other problems that might get in the way of the repairs.

Have you ever heard someone say their computer wasn't working right, so they unhooked it, took it to a computer repair shop and when they got there the system was working fine? This is because the power had drained out of the system!

(Step 1) Shut down and power off the computer.

(Step 2) Once the computer is powered off, unplug the power cord. If it is a laptop also remove the battery. It is important that any way for the system to keep getting power is unplugged or unhooked.

(Step 3) With the power cord unplugged and the battery removed (if you have one), hit the power button a few times as if you are trying to turn on the computer. When you do this and the computer tries to turn on, all the electricity is drained out of the system.

(Step 4) Plug the power cord back in and reinsert the battery (if you have one) and turn the computer on.

All done!


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#22
February 7, 2018 at 23:06:44
Seach in BIOS for SATA Mode.
Check this setting.
If you installed your operating system, while SATA Mode was set to IDE, you need to set this in BIOS, if not already done.

If you installed your OS, while SATA Mode was AHCI, you have to set AHCI for the SATA Mode.

If you use the wrong setting, your computer will not find any bootloader.

You can simply try to change this settings one by one, and boot up again.


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#23
February 8, 2018 at 07:17:31
Hey all


I ended up just formatting Windows... Its back to normal now... That was a nightmare! Thank you everyone for trying to help me! IT is much appreciated!


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#24
February 8, 2018 at 13:56:46
Whew!, well done, just as well, you followed your instincts.

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#25
February 8, 2018 at 20:14:47
It was probably as in #22 and reinstalling it fixed the conflict by using the now correct settings.
As said, well done.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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