Pre-installed Windows 10 apps

December 19, 2016 at 14:51:35
Specs: several
My new Windows 10 laptop came with a bunch of Microsoft
apps installed or partially installed. Is it possible to use *ANY*
of them without first connecting to the Internet and getting an
account with Microsoft? For example, my understanding is
that the Get Started app explains how to connect to the Internet
and how to sign in with a Microsoft account. There's no way I
can view that info unless ...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


See More: Pre-installed Windows 10 apps

Report •

#1
December 19, 2016 at 16:02:20
Yes indeed. You can sign on with a local account and avoid an MS one (although they try not to make it too obvious). Also you can often get Win 10 desktop apps by searching for them in Google. I avoided an MS account during the upgrade from Win 8.1 on my PC and from Win 7 on my laptop. I have access to all the Store Apps and no password either.

http://www.howtogeek.com/226540/how...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#2
December 19, 2016 at 16:33:41

Report •

#3
December 19, 2016 at 16:55:31
riider

The way I read this I don't think Jeff wasn't wanting to remove apps.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 19, 2016 at 19:09:09
Probably not. But I'm suggesting he does.

Report •

#5
December 19, 2016 at 19:42:50
OK riider - understood.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#6
December 20, 2016 at 21:51:43
I probably will want to uninstall all the Microsoft apps
requiring a Microsoft account, but at the moment I'm just
asking which apps require a Microsoft account. Though I
asked it somewhat clumsily.

It appears that all the apps given tiles want to connect to
the Internet. Most require connection to work. I see that
Calendar, the app in the top-left tile, doesn't need Internet
connection, though the very first thing it does is ask for
an e-mail address. Obviously apps like Mail, Weather, News,
and Store are useless unless connected. But it appears that
Get Started also requires connection to the Internet. Is that
correct? When I start it I get a selection of 4 subjects:
"Get connected to the Internet", "Make your PC easier to use",
"Hear text read aloud with Narrator", and "Using speech
recognition". I'm pretty sure there's a lot more to this app.

And OneNote. It looks like a simple text editor, but the
first thing it does is ask me to "Pick an account to sign in
with", and the only option is "Personal Microsoft account".
Followed by "We can't connect to the Internet right now.
Please check your connection and try again." That's it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#7
December 21, 2016 at 04:55:57
You could sign in to MS, uninstall the apps then switch to a local account.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#8
December 21, 2016 at 08:40:48
Uh ... Yeah, I could do that... but couldn't I just skip step one,
uninstall the apps then set up a local account? Or set up a
local account and then uninstall the apps? Or just uninstall
the apps and not set up any account?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#9
December 21, 2016 at 08:47:36
What's the relation between an Account (in Settings)
and a User Account (in Control Panel)?

Edit to add:

This appears to be answered halfway down this page:

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/tips-m...

> In Windows 8 and 10, when you select the Control Panel option
> Make changes to my account in PC settings (under Control Panel
> > User Accounts > User Accounts), this brings up the Accounts
> screen in the Settings app, where you can make various changes
> to your account.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


Report •

#10
December 21, 2016 at 10:20:34
All a bit of a hornets nest but this goes a long way to explain it:
http://www.windowscentral.com/manag...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#11
December 21, 2016 at 12:27:43
That explains a lot of things, including pretty much
answering my original questions, but I'm no more sure
about answers to my questions in post #8 than before.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#12
December 21, 2016 at 14:25:23
Re #8

Not something I've tried but you could see if the system allows you to uninstall the apps you don't want - it's hard to imagine it would do any harm trying. If that works you could then set up a local account.

Getting them back if you change your mind later could be difficult but as I said earlier it's worth checking in Google because some are available as desktop apps.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#13
December 23, 2016 at 08:48:47
I had already uninstalled a few of the MS apps before
starting this thread, including Microsoft Office 365 and
OneDrive.

Getting stuff back that I foolishly delete is one of the main
reasons I asked whether I could clean install Wndows 10
from the laptop's Restore partition a couple of weeks ago,
before I had removed anything significant. I did have to
restore an Intel app that I uninstalled recklessly, because
it included a driver for the TPM. The only sign of a problem
was an entry for "Unknown device" in Device Manager.
I fixed it by downloading the app from Intel.

I have a substitute Office program on disk, and the laptop
came with a key to download another Office substitute.
And I also have on disk the version of Office that came
with Windows 95. Powerpoint on that disk was crap, but
Word, Access, and Excel were fine, and will probably do
everything I need.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Report •

#14
December 23, 2016 at 12:07:42
Uninstalling the Unknown Device from Device Manager might clear it if you've not already tried. It might find new hardware on reboot and name it properly.

I'm still using Office 2003 on Win 10 - like you it does most of what I need. The only little niggles are some of these newer files with an extension ending with x. They are becoming very popular as they are compressed and can sometimes defeat my Office even with compatibility packs etc. Having said that one way or the next I have worked my way around them.

Kingsoft Office freebie, now WPS, opens everything MS but the usage format is not quite the same. Probably fairly easy to learn but I didn't bother to persist with it as I'm not an avid Office user.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#15
December 23, 2016 at 14:39:45
You can open the newer Word format files in Openoffice.org and resave them in older Office formats (avoid their native format). You may get a warning that you may loose some formatting but I have found little issues.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

Ask Question