Solved PC is completely broken, what now?

February 26, 2018 at 11:13:30
Specs: Windows 10
my computer recently had started shutting down randomly and getting BSOD occasionally with different errors every time and it has gotten worse to the point that it cant even boot up windows it will BSOD before booting into windows and trying to reinstall windows with a flash drive didn't work either because it would BSOD almost right after starting the reinstall. The cause of the BSOD is different almost every time but common ones are:
Critical Process died, system thread exception not handled, and Bad Pool Header. I cant even load windows to fix any of these errors. what is the next step to fixing my PC? Should I take it to a tech support shop?

Ps. the PC was custom built several years ago and some parts have been upgraded but the CPU, motherboard, and hard drive are pretty old are these problems possibly because of old parts?


See More: PC is completely broken, what now?

Report •

✔ Best Answer
February 26, 2018 at 15:26:19
This is a longish shot - but allowing for the apparent age of the overall system... it may be effective.

This is an olde system and likely it is showing its age and may have oxidised connectors for RAM - and even for one or more of the plug in cards

It's desktop/tower system; not a laptop by the sounds of it.

Remove all power - the power cord included. (If it was a laptop one would also remove the battery too.)

Open the case and remove all RAM sticks; clean the edge connectors on each one with a soft pencil style eraser.

(Do NOT use anything even mildly abrasive when cleaning edge connectors.)

Then wipe those edge connectors with a soft lintless cloth (even a kleenex); after-which wipe the edges with a tissue moistened with iso-propyl alchohol. Then wipe them dry again with a kleenex.

Why the iiso-propyl routine? To remove any possible traces of 'grease" - skin oil or whatever - that may be there for whatever reasons, consequence of the cleaning process with the eraser.etc.

Re-insert one stick into its socket - firmly. Then remove it and wipe its edge connector again. Re-insert it into the same socket; remove and again wipe the edge connector s above. Re-insert again into its socket firmly and leave it there.

Repeat the process with each stick in turn.

Then remove all of any cards installed; do each one in turn, one at a time. Clean edge connectors as above for the RAM sticks; and re-insert/remove etc. as for the RAM sticks.

Check the cpu is firmly inserted into its sockets if applicable.

Check the cpu cooling fan is free of all dust etc.; likewise any other cooling fans and air vents (psu included) are free of dust. If needs-be use a can of compressed air to blow dust away. Do NOT use a vacuum cleaner blower aspect if it as one.

Having ensured that all RAM sticks are securely inserted, likewise any plugin cards... Restore power and see it things have improved?

My reasoning is that over time RAM can become less then properly inserted into the sockets; and those sockets and edge connectors can also become slightly oxidised... Similarly with any plug in cards...

The above cleaning routine will usually remove any accumulate dust around edge connectors; also remove any oxidation.

BSOD can "sometimes" be due to problems with RAM... It may simply be the above situation - dirty etc. connectors; or even failing RAM sticks (one or more going down).

To test individual RAM sticks - after cleaning as above... remove them all and insert just one (ensuring it is enough to allow the system to boot up). If no improvement then remove that stick and try another; and so on until each stick has been tested that way.

If per chance on stick works and not another... then the one that doesn't (i.e. it produces the bsod effect) it is possible that stick is faulty. If two or more sticks are OK and the rest not so... then again likely you have an issue with those RAM sticks that produce a bsod.

As i say, it is a longish shot; but I have found the RAM cleaning approach to be effective in resolving not only bsod problems on occasion, but even bluetooth connection issues!



#1
February 26, 2018 at 12:04:43
Pity you didn't post earlier, it's easier when it sometimes works. You might be able to get it to run in Safe Mode, which could help diagnosis:
https://www.digitalcitizen.life/4-w...

If you get there, run these two just to clear any obvious malware:
AdwCleaner:
https://www.malwarebytes.com/adwcle...
Download and "Save" the file somewhere. Go to the saved file then double click it to run the program. Use the "Scan" button, followed by the "Clean" button.

MalwareBytes:
https://www.malwarebytes.org/
(use the "Free Download" button rather than the "Buy Now" button).
After the install go to "Settings > Protection". Under Scan Options move the "Scan for rootkits" slider over to On and Run the Threat Scan. Quarantine anything it finds.

It will probably be necessary to download and "Save" the install files on another computer then copy them onto a flash drive to install on this one.

If you manage to run them we can take it forward from there.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#2
February 26, 2018 at 12:57:12
Can you boot into the bios?

Report •

#3
February 26, 2018 at 13:25:49
Further to my #1. If you manage to get into Safe Mode, or even just the command prompt, pop back (whether the malware programs run or not) because there are some basic checks we can do from there.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 26, 2018 at 15:26:19
✔ Best Answer
This is a longish shot - but allowing for the apparent age of the overall system... it may be effective.

This is an olde system and likely it is showing its age and may have oxidised connectors for RAM - and even for one or more of the plug in cards

It's desktop/tower system; not a laptop by the sounds of it.

Remove all power - the power cord included. (If it was a laptop one would also remove the battery too.)

Open the case and remove all RAM sticks; clean the edge connectors on each one with a soft pencil style eraser.

(Do NOT use anything even mildly abrasive when cleaning edge connectors.)

Then wipe those edge connectors with a soft lintless cloth (even a kleenex); after-which wipe the edges with a tissue moistened with iso-propyl alchohol. Then wipe them dry again with a kleenex.

Why the iiso-propyl routine? To remove any possible traces of 'grease" - skin oil or whatever - that may be there for whatever reasons, consequence of the cleaning process with the eraser.etc.

Re-insert one stick into its socket - firmly. Then remove it and wipe its edge connector again. Re-insert it into the same socket; remove and again wipe the edge connector s above. Re-insert again into its socket firmly and leave it there.

Repeat the process with each stick in turn.

Then remove all of any cards installed; do each one in turn, one at a time. Clean edge connectors as above for the RAM sticks; and re-insert/remove etc. as for the RAM sticks.

Check the cpu is firmly inserted into its sockets if applicable.

Check the cpu cooling fan is free of all dust etc.; likewise any other cooling fans and air vents (psu included) are free of dust. If needs-be use a can of compressed air to blow dust away. Do NOT use a vacuum cleaner blower aspect if it as one.

Having ensured that all RAM sticks are securely inserted, likewise any plugin cards... Restore power and see it things have improved?

My reasoning is that over time RAM can become less then properly inserted into the sockets; and those sockets and edge connectors can also become slightly oxidised... Similarly with any plug in cards...

The above cleaning routine will usually remove any accumulate dust around edge connectors; also remove any oxidation.

BSOD can "sometimes" be due to problems with RAM... It may simply be the above situation - dirty etc. connectors; or even failing RAM sticks (one or more going down).

To test individual RAM sticks - after cleaning as above... remove them all and insert just one (ensuring it is enough to allow the system to boot up). If no improvement then remove that stick and try another; and so on until each stick has been tested that way.

If per chance on stick works and not another... then the one that doesn't (i.e. it produces the bsod effect) it is possible that stick is faulty. If two or more sticks are OK and the rest not so... then again likely you have an issue with those RAM sticks that produce a bsod.

As i say, it is a longish shot; but I have found the RAM cleaning approach to be effective in resolving not only bsod problems on occasion, but even bluetooth connection issues!


Report •

#5
March 2, 2018 at 14:31:07
Guys I followed yall's suggestions unfortunately I cannot get it to boot in safe mode and cleaning the RAM sticks /cards did not fix the problem. I think the problem is most likely related to either the motherboard or the CPU which are both about 5 years old. I think I will try replacing both and seeing if that fixes it. Thanks so much for offering your help I appreciate it a lot.

Report •

#6
March 2, 2018 at 15:14:37
Per chance... Have you tried booting using a Linux dvd?

That would test all the hardware and cpu... The Linux variant (if it boots up) will load into RAM only, leaving the hard drive untouched (unless you opt to install it - which do not of course).

Ubuntu, and Puppy Linux are two flavours of Linux often used; and the Linux gurus here will offer others too.


Report •

#7
March 6, 2018 at 17:33:03
Yes, running a Live Linux CD/DVD should prove something, at least give a clue whether you have a Windows problem or hardware. They don't use the hard disk so everything is back to Windows when you shut down and remove the disk. Folk often use them when they are checking to see whether they might like Linux or not.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

Ask Question