Solved need to read Win98 formatted CD discs on Win10 machine

May 30, 2017 at 13:40:43
Specs: Windows 10
I need access to information on my Win98 created discs and I do not have any idea how to recover the discs.

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✔ Best Answer
May 31, 2017 at 12:10:44
I had a CD burner running on Windows 98, purchased about 1999. Disks created then are generally compatible with newer systems but the media may be bad. CD-R technology has a shorter lifetime than commercial discs. 5-10 years is reasonable for older discs and could be less for cheaper varieties. CD-RW media was less reliable than CR-R.

There are programs available that can help with recovery but I have no experience with them. But after this much time recovery may not be possible.



#1
May 30, 2017 at 14:32:36
Did you try putting them in the optical drive? There's is nothing preventing a Win10 computer from reading a disc created in Win98.

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#2
May 30, 2017 at 20:50:40
The only thing that matters is that there is a program installed on the computer that can open those particular file types. If you have any problems let us know the file extension type and there may be a suggestion for that.
If you see nothing in the optical drive then maybe it was not correctly or properly burned to the disk.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
May 31, 2017 at 06:43:17
I'm guessing he's talking about floppy discs in which case there was an issue with reading discs created in Windows 98 on newer OS's due to a security descriptor issue.

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#4
May 31, 2017 at 07:34:25
CD burners were also around in Win98's time, so it's possible we're talking about CD-R's. In which case the CDs themselves have probably gone bad, since early CD-Rs had an expected lifetime of 5-10 years.

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#5
May 31, 2017 at 12:10:44
✔ Best Answer
I had a CD burner running on Windows 98, purchased about 1999. Disks created then are generally compatible with newer systems but the media may be bad. CD-R technology has a shorter lifetime than commercial discs. 5-10 years is reasonable for older discs and could be less for cheaper varieties. CD-RW media was less reliable than CR-R.

There are programs available that can help with recovery but I have no experience with them. But after this much time recovery may not be possible.


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