Laptop Keyboard Automatically Type Slash Bars

Lenovo /
May 4, 2019 at 04:07:16
Specs: Windows 10
Hi Friends,
I am also getting same problem. I Hope this is Windows 10 problem. Many of the people getting same problem when they are updated to Windows 10. Before we didn't hear this type of issue.

So, Please concentrate on Windows 10 Operating System. And please let me know if you find out any solution \\\\\for this problem.

Thank you!


See More: Laptop Keyboard Automatically Type Slash Bars

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#1
May 4, 2019 at 04:39:36
"Many of the people getting same problem when they are updated to Windows 10"
New update out today, see if the problem remains after the update.



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#2
May 4, 2019 at 13:39:40
Also see if your slash key s sticking down. It may be just a coincidence.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
May 4, 2019 at 20:39:21
I just Googled "Windows 10 typing backslash and virtually nothing came up.

I'm guessing were going to see spam for some Windows fix software in the next day or so.

Sudhakar, can you provide links to the supposed many people having this issue?


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Related Solutions

#4
May 4, 2019 at 20:45:11
Keyboard Automatically Type Slash Bars
http://bit.ly/2PLFMti

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#5
May 4, 2019 at 23:19:48
I'm not sure why many people are using your keyboard, but that might explain why it broke.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#6
May 5, 2019 at 07:44:02
I should have clarified, I see virtually nothing about Windows 10 causing this problem. Every one of those articles indicated it was a faulty keyboard and not the fault of the operating system or updating to Window 10.

message edited by THX 1138


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#7
May 5, 2019 at 09:36:33
Almost always these sort of symptoms turn out to be the keyboard itself.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
May 5, 2019 at 13:10:29
It seems to me unlikely that a key would begin to repeat
unless it was first pressed. If this is a real issue, not spam,
then I would want to know whether the key has to be pressed
in order for the problem to begin.

It also seems unlikely that either slash key would be the one
key affected. More likely that it would be a key getting pressed
very frequently, like the down arrow, Ctrl, shift, or enter keys.

It has been many years since I last pulled a keyboard apart.
Early on, some keyboards had keys that broke the electrical
contact when pressed. I knew that, so when a friend pulled
off the keycap of a "Reset" key in order to prevent accidental
reset of the computer, I predicted that the keyboard would no
longer work. Sure enough, a bunch of keys (all those on the
same matrix line as the "Reset" key) were suddenly dead.
Putting the keycap back on (restoring the circuit) fixed it.

Do any keyboards still work that way?

My limited experience suggests that a "stuck" key usually
doesn't look or feel stuck. It has to be disassembled to be
investigated or cleaned. Vacuuming or even washing a
washable keyboard isn't likely to do it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
May 5, 2019 at 13:56:43
Consumer grade uses dome switches. The bottom is basically a printed circuit board with two exposed contacts where the key should be. The top contains a conductive material, held in place by a dome. Pressing a key deforms the dome and allows the material to bridge the two contacts, closing the circuit. Easy to manufacture, and robust enough to last a few years.

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#10
May 5, 2019 at 17:46:41
You reminded me that I actually did take apart and repair
(by cleaning) a sort of keyboard just last year: A TV remote
control. The buttons consist of a couple of molded rubber
pads with conductive spots on the underside, which press
down on the circuit board. Dirt had got between the rubber
sheets and the circuit board, and I can imagine that in some
cases the dirt might be conductive. I **presume** that most
such keyboards are sealed so dirt can't get in.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
May 5, 2019 at 21:13:46
Keyboards are affected all of the time by spills and key pounders.
Spills affect recent desktop keyboards less because the contacts are not on the bottom interior surface but close spaces along the edges or guides can get sticky from liquids, crumbs, and such.
Heavy handed users can wear keyboards out faster but the slash key is not a key that should get a lot of use so less likely.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
May 6, 2019 at 06:44:38
re10 (jeff)

In the past I've found that almost no domestic or soho keyboard is impervious to fluid penetration.

They all find their way into places where they ought not to be.

Likewise - over time - crumbs too.

If water gets in it's often a simple matter of opening eh keyboard assembly and(if required) mopping up - with a paper towel/kleenex type tissue - obvious water; and then allowing to dry in a warm place. One can blow warm (NOT HOT) air from a hair dryer over the assembly; and even wrapping a plastic back with silica gel - or raw rice grains - leaving in a warm situation for a day or two, will dry it out. Sometimes a rinse through with alcohol will help remove water; but again one must allow the assembly to dry out as above.

If it's cola type drinks - and they are true PIA due to high sugar contents and generally sticky ingredients - a serious wash through with clean (ideally soft) or even distilled water is essential; then dry as a above. Soup is even worse!

If it's coffee, tea etc. they're almost as bad a soup/cola - due to milk and possibly sugar content...

Many keyboards used in broadcasting environments - used to programme kit for use on air do - use a better quality keyboard; but even then they still suffer as above.

I found it wise to replace seriously used keyboards at regular intervals - regardless of type; to ensure no stuck keys, mis-types etc.; and with the cheaper keyboards a time efficient way to remove seriously dirty keyboards from circulation; cleaning them taking a lot of time/effort better applied elsewhere...

The /// issue here I suspect is either muck under the key/character cover, or simply a duff/worn/damaged key assembly... Much as Fingers suggests.


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#13
May 6, 2019 at 10:59:51
Well, remember we're talking about a laptop keyboard here. It's just as likely this laptop has been figuratively drop kicked, as I typically see a laptop keyboard fail due to the supporting hard plastic breaking. Not saying it isn't an internally dirty keyboard, just making sure we consider alternatives. For instance, it might not be hardware. It could be some driver or software somehow incompatible with newer versions of Win10. In which case we'd never know because we tend to avoid such obviously faulty software.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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