Solved Installed Crucial MX300 SSD but cannot boot from it

Micro-star international Microstar gx660...
January 3, 2017 at 14:21:16
Specs: Windows 64, Intel Core i7 / 8GB
Dear all,

Happy new year first of all. I have a MSI GX660R, running Windows 10 Pro. It has 2 500GB 2.5" HDDs.

I recently replaced one faulty HDD (was just used for storage) and replaced it with a 1TB Cruxial MX300 2.5" SSD. It came with Acronis True Image HD 2015, which I used to clone my main HHD so that I could format it and use it as storage, and run Windows off the new SSD.

The clone took about an hour and I tried booting from the SSD, and it came up with BOOTMGR is missing. I'm completely lost and I have no clue what to do next, even though I have searched the net.

Additional info: On startup it reads that both are "Non RAID drives", although I have RAID configuration in my BIOS not AHCI - I tried changing it to AHCI in BIOS in the past but it wouldn't boot, so I just left it as RAID. This laptop was originally a RAID 0 configuration as it had 2x 500GB HDDs, but I made the faulty one redundant somehow.

I would really appreciate your help with this. I have attached some screenshots in case they might be of use.

https://i.imgsafe.org/c232f7084f.png
https://i.imgsafe.org/c232fcc5af.png

Thank you in advance.

message edited by Cyrus1


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✔ Best Answer
January 7, 2017 at 14:34:29
Hi everyone, thanks for all of your replies. I ended up reinstalling Windows 10 on the SSD. I found out that the HDD wasn't on RAID, even though the BIOS was set to it.

I was able to change to AHCI with the steps below, although it is usually for IDE to AHCI, it worked for RAID to AHCI.

1. Run Command Prompt as Admin
2. Invoke a Safe Mode boot with the command: bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal
3. Restart the PC and enter your BIOS during bootup.
4. Change from RAID to AHCI mode then Save & Exit.
5. Windows 10 will launch in Safe Mode.
6. Right click the Window icon and select to run the Command Prompt in Admin mode from among the various options.
7. Cancel Safe Mode booting with the command: bcdedit /deletevalue {current} safeboot
8. Restart your PC once more and this time it will boot up normally but with AHCI mode activated.

I now have a fresh install of Windows 10 on the SSD however I can still boot with the old HDD without problems. I'm copying all of my important C: partition data from the HDD to the SSD, and then I will format the partition. The HDD will then be used as a storage drive.

I'm very happy with the Crucial MX300 SSD. The only issue is that my laptop only offers SATA II so I can't enjoy the SSD's full capabilities.

Thank you.



#1
January 3, 2017 at 18:04:09
Can you still boot with the original HDD?

Sometime new drives need to be formatted before use. I would boot with your original (if you still can) and format the SSD then try the clone again.

I don't need to be right, but I am never wrong.


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#2
January 3, 2017 at 22:23:29
If you close the partition then you miss out on the boot partition, if you clone the whole drive than the boot partition is cloned as well.
If you had RAID then the SSD drive is not similar enough to be able to restore the RAID array. If I remember correctly in order to go from RAID to AHCI or reverse you need to delete all partitions, change over, repartition and format. Then reinstall from scratch. If a disk image was made before the change over, you might be able to use that image to reimage the drive and save a complete reinstall but I am not sure of that.

Note: This might be obvious but may be overlooked occasionally, when changing from one boot drive to the newer drive, do not forget to go into BIOS set up, change which drives are bootable and change the boot order. Save and Exit.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
January 4, 2017 at 10:21:50
Thank you for your replies. Yes I can still boot with the original HDD.

I'm still on RAID - I changed the BIOS configuration back to raid when the original HDD wouldn't boot on AHCI.

My boot order was arranged so that the new SSD was 1st priority, but it didn't help.

What do you guys reckon I should do? Shall I format and reinstall again? I guess recloning wouldn't be a good option.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 4, 2017 at 16:28:24
Try making a disk image and save it to another drive, then use that to image the new SSD drive and see if that helps, if not then reinstall.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
January 5, 2017 at 07:26:53
You might try and use the Clone OS option.

UEFI can be a royal PITA sometimes, just putting the BIOSback to safe defaults has helped me a couple of times.

Wait until you try to downgrade back to Win 7 !


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#6
January 7, 2017 at 14:34:29
✔ Best Answer
Hi everyone, thanks for all of your replies. I ended up reinstalling Windows 10 on the SSD. I found out that the HDD wasn't on RAID, even though the BIOS was set to it.

I was able to change to AHCI with the steps below, although it is usually for IDE to AHCI, it worked for RAID to AHCI.

1. Run Command Prompt as Admin
2. Invoke a Safe Mode boot with the command: bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal
3. Restart the PC and enter your BIOS during bootup.
4. Change from RAID to AHCI mode then Save & Exit.
5. Windows 10 will launch in Safe Mode.
6. Right click the Window icon and select to run the Command Prompt in Admin mode from among the various options.
7. Cancel Safe Mode booting with the command: bcdedit /deletevalue {current} safeboot
8. Restart your PC once more and this time it will boot up normally but with AHCI mode activated.

I now have a fresh install of Windows 10 on the SSD however I can still boot with the old HDD without problems. I'm copying all of my important C: partition data from the HDD to the SSD, and then I will format the partition. The HDD will then be used as a storage drive.

I'm very happy with the Crucial MX300 SSD. The only issue is that my laptop only offers SATA II so I can't enjoy the SSD's full capabilities.

Thank you.


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