Solved How to use OneDrive

Hewlett-packard / PAVILION
December 31, 2019 at 09:33:21
Specs: Windows 10, Intel/12GB RAM
I have a new PC with Windows 10. My PC has two hard drives, and I backup my Primary Drive to my Secondary Drive. I see that I have OneDrive, but don't know how, or if, I should use it. If I do use it do I have to pay for it's use?

Thanks for listening, Uncle Dewey


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✔ Best Answer
January 1, 2020 at 10:10:59
"Now I have to decide why I would want to use a cloud site..."

https://www.securestorageservices.c...

Even though the above is from a cloud-based provider, they pretty much cover the bases. Personally, without a high-speed connection, it's pretty much a no-brainer for me (stick with local backup media)...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A



#1
December 31, 2019 at 10:18:23
5GB on OneDrive is free. Other plans are available for higher amounts of storage, around $2/month for up to 100GB

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#2
December 31, 2019 at 15:18:30
onedrive alternatives free
http://bit.ly/35caK41

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#3
December 31, 2019 at 15:49:34
Must be a slight error in the site's address, as it came back as an invalid web site.

Uncle Dewey


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Related Solutions

#4
December 31, 2019 at 16:10:51
"as it came back as an invalid web site'
Works for me.

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#5
December 31, 2019 at 16:19:46
What John gave is a link to a Google search on the Australian
version of Google. I can imagine that it might not work from all
locations.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
December 31, 2019 at 16:28:47
Ok, here is the link with au taken out.
http://bit.ly/2ZFAAfo

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#7
January 1, 2020 at 09:27:19
Hi John,

It worked this time. Now I have to decide why I would want to use a cloud site, since I backup my primary hard drive to my secondary hard drive.

Thanks a bunch, Uncle Dewey

PS: to Jeff as I was born and raised in and around Minneapolis. UD


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#8
January 1, 2020 at 10:10:59
✔ Best Answer
"Now I have to decide why I would want to use a cloud site..."

https://www.securestorageservices.c...

Even though the above is from a cloud-based provider, they pretty much cover the bases. Personally, without a high-speed connection, it's pretty much a no-brainer for me (stick with local backup media)...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#9
January 1, 2020 at 13:29:21
" Now I have to decide why I would want to use a cloud site, since I backup my primary hard drive to my secondary hard drive"
I have only my important stuff backed up to a secondary drive, also to my spare comp & laptop. Plus a thumb drive.

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#10
January 2, 2020 at 02:17:26
And really important stuff - typically family photos, financial items, music - copy to DVD as well. Check the DVDs are fully accessible after burning, then (labelled of course) in safe location away from the second hard drive. Using two different types of media ensures (one hopes) that if one gets damaged the other won’t. Also check DVDs at intervals and update as needs-be.

John mentions flash/thumb drives... I wouldn’t rely on those for serious long term storage; they can and do fail at any time. Fine for short term storage, knowing there is another copy on more reliable media.

Cloud systems are over sold. I prefer local media storage as my backup.


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#11
January 2, 2020 at 09:52:10
I respectfully dissagree, I fully endorse cloud backups. I use OneDrive for my documents and Live Drive for data files.

Heaven forbid, but it does happen. Houses burn down, get broken into, get destroyed by natual disasters, floods, tornados, etc. Any of these could cause you to loose your computer plus any backup media you have.


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#12
January 2, 2020 at 10:46:37
This will always be a point of discussion (cloud storage). Sadly there ain't no truly safe system - unless you're into big money... e.g. governments, banks, multi-nationals and the like. And they can be hacked, and have been of course...

And one is trusting that the sites do have proper backups in place.. I think there have been instances (albeit few publicly disclosed) where the sites didn't have proper backups... Not too long ago (well maybe a little longer...; it was late 90s) a major financial house in NY lost a bomb, when their backups (local and elsewhere) failed... Systems that ought to have kicked in automatically - didn't... ; and off site storage systems weren't up to par at the time either. I was taking an MCSE course at the time, and our Novell/M$ instructor gave us quite a lengthy discussion about that situation...

Also what happens if suddenly you "need" the stuff in the cloud, and you haven't got access to "the cloud" for whatever reason? Local storage media is independent of such limitations...

I take the point about fires... and when considers to dreadful situation in Eastern Australia just now... one cannot fail to agree re' off site storage has it's values.

Maybe the best approach is both systems - if you're seriously concerned about data security - and access to it at all times.

Now must arrange to hire in a deep digger to begin preparing ground for personal fire//phlud and nuclear proof bunker in back garden.


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#13
January 2, 2020 at 11:32:40
"Also what happens if suddenly you "need" the stuff in the cloud, and you haven't got access to "the cloud" for whatever reason? Local storage media is independent of such limitations..."

This is true, I always keep a local backup too in case I need the stuff quickly and in the case if Internet connectiviy isn't avaiable to reach my cloud storage..


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#14
January 6, 2020 at 10:38:44
Balancing out both Offline and Online Storage is the key. Both have advantages and disadvantages and nothing is perfect.

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