Solved How to Uninstall O&ORegEditor

March 15, 2019 at 16:11:17
Specs: Windows 10
O&ORegEditor supposedly runs as a portable. I've used it occasionally for years. Suddenly, on a new Win10 installation, it seizes the .reg extension as its own, so I can't merge .reg files as usual using the default Windows registry editor. There's no O&O entry in the list of installed programs. There's also no option in its own settings to make it let go of .reg files. It's the same old version 12, but suddenly in my newly installed Win10 1809 it's acting like a virus. Ideas?

See More: How to Uninstall O&ORegEditor

Report •

✔ Best Answer
March 18, 2019 at 08:05:33
That's a different problem. Win10 changed the way it does file associations compared to every other version of Windows (it adds a validation hash), presumably to punish any program that tries to associate itself with its file type. In practice what ends up happening is you double click on an mp3, and Win10 goes, "Oh no! This file association is corrupt (hash mismatch)!" You get prompted, and you pick your program (hash fixed). Your program launches, and since it was configured to register itself for mp3s, it does so (hash broken). Repeat ad infinitum. Because incessant UAC popups were the most loved part of Vista, right guys?

You can go into the program, tell it not to associate itself with its file types, and that might fix your endless prompting.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way



#1
March 15, 2019 at 16:25:15
Right click on the shortcut > Properties > Open File Location.
Is there an uninstall or unwise?
If not, the whole folder can be deleted.

I would then run the Wise tools

Run both of these, in this order.
1: Wise Disk Cleaner ( Run the 1st three tabs, left to right. I use default settings, leave boxes that are unchecked, unchecked ) Reboot when finished.
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/Wise-D...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/screen...
http://www.wisecleaner.com/download...
http://i.imgur.com/Jecnfvb.gif
http://i.imgur.com/0xHwdom.gif
https://i.imgur.com/q8GRvVw.gif
https://i.imgur.com/ImAsNPL.gif
https://i.imgur.com/ad7SEKM.gif

2: Wise Registry Cleaner ( Only use Registry Cleaner & with default settings. Don't use System Tuneup, that is for Experts, you really have to know what you are doing ) Reboot when finished.
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/Wise-R...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/screen...
http://www.wisecleaner.com/wiseregi...
http://i.imgur.com/Qy7HWcA.gif
http://fs1.directupload.net/images/...
http://fs1.directupload.net/images/...
http://fs1.directupload.net/images/...


Report •

#2
March 15, 2019 at 16:36:41

Report •

#3
March 15, 2019 at 17:04:56
Thank you for the quick replies! I am writing to clarify the problem and report the solution. The problem was that O&O retained control of .reg files in Windows 10 command prompt and PowerShell, even after I selected File > REG files > Always Open > No, and do not ask again. The Remove Shortcut option did not seem relevant, but that did prove to be the solution: now I can run .reg files from the command prompt or in PowerShell, and regedit will handle them. I think it was bad form for O&O to seize control as it did, and I'm sure some people have been perplexed, but it looks like the problem is solved for me. Thanks again.

P.S. Regarding the registry cleaner, I'd be inclined toward CCleaner. The advice seems to be not to use them, but I did find that O&O changed or added a number of registry keys. I didn't think portable programs did that, but then I haven't checked, so I could be wrong about that.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 15, 2019 at 17:35:47
"I think it was bad form for O&O to seize control as it did"
It hasn't been updated for a couple of years.

Report •

#5
March 15, 2019 at 17:42:48
"The advice seems to be not to use them"
I've been using the Wise tools, on hundreds of comps, for over 10 years, never had a problem.

Is CCleaner Safe? Not Quite. And We Show You How to Replace It
https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/stop-...


Report •

#6
March 15, 2019 at 18:12:01
Here are some other registry tools, if you want to try.

RegSeeker is very good for registry searching, click on > Find in registry, tick all the boxes in > Keys, put a word ( example AOL ) in > Search for: & click > Search. Now you have a list on one page, of all the registry entries for AOL. http://i.imgur.com/ZjHcJeS.gif
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/...
http://www.snapfiles.com/get/regsee...
http://www.hoverdesk.net/

Registry Finder
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/...
http://registry-finder.com/

Registrar Registry Manager Home Edition ( Free version available )
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/...
http://www.resplendence.com/registrar
http://www.resplendence.com/downloa...

RegScanner
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/...
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/regsca...
Advantages over RegEdit find of Windows
* RegScanner utility display the entire search result at once, so you don't have to press F3 in order to find the next value.
* In addition to the standard string search (Like in RegEdit), RegScanner can also find Registry values by data length, value type (REG_SZ, REG_DWORD, and so on), and by modified date of the key.
* RegScanner can find a unicode string located inside a binary value.
* RegScanner allows you to make a case sensitive search.
* While scanning the Registry, RegScanner display the current scanned Registry key, as opposed to RegEdit, that simply display a boring "Searching the registry" dialog-box.

message edited by Johnw


Report •

#7
March 15, 2019 at 20:54:25
There is no reason whatsoever to do a 3 pass wipe if you have a virus.

There in no reason to use any third party app to delete partitions. If you do want to completely wipe and start over, the Windows DVD/USB stick has all the tools you need to delete, re-create, & format a partition before re-installing Windows.

message edited by THX 1138


Report •

#8
March 15, 2019 at 23:34:09
On to the actual problem of fixing the .reg file association. Open either Command Prompt or PowerShell and run the following. If it doesn't work, run it from the admin version of Command Prompt or PowerShell:
assoc .reg=regfile
ftype regfile=regedit.exe "%1"

It might not get the icon correct, but at least it should allow registry importing again. I'd give you a clean copy of the key, but I'm not on a Win10 box at the moment.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

message edited by Razor2.3


Report •

#9
March 18, 2019 at 05:22:08
Razor2.3 -- good info. Thank you. In those two commands, is "regfile" just a variable, such that I could use this procedure for other kinds of file associations? In this new installation, Win10 seems to be asking me repeatedly which program I want to use for various purposes (e.g., to play MP3s). Maybe I can set up a batch file to run these commands hourly until it has been walloped into submission. (Kidding, sort of.)

Report •

#10
March 18, 2019 at 08:05:33
✔ Best Answer
That's a different problem. Win10 changed the way it does file associations compared to every other version of Windows (it adds a validation hash), presumably to punish any program that tries to associate itself with its file type. In practice what ends up happening is you double click on an mp3, and Win10 goes, "Oh no! This file association is corrupt (hash mismatch)!" You get prompted, and you pick your program (hash fixed). Your program launches, and since it was configured to register itself for mp3s, it does so (hash broken). Repeat ad infinitum. Because incessant UAC popups were the most loved part of Vista, right guys?

You can go into the program, tell it not to associate itself with its file types, and that might fix your endless prompting.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

Ask Question