How to turn off TinyWall?

April 15, 2017 at 22:00:08
Specs: several
It isn't obvious how to turn off TinyWall without uninstalling it.
What do I click?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#1
April 16, 2017 at 01:55:46
All third-party firewalls install a quick-access icon in the Windows system tray for quick or temporary settings - - you evidently didn't know that?

Right-click the Tinywall icon in the Windows System Tray/Notification Area at bottom-right of the screen.

That should bring up a menu with various options, one of which should be "Change mode".

Hover the mouse over that, then left-click "Disable firewall"

Don't forget to re-enable it when you've done whatever it is you had to disable it for.

message edited by phil22


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#2
April 16, 2017 at 03:18:39
I did that. A notice pops up saying that TinyWall is now disabled.

Process Monitor shows that TinyWall is still running and accessing
the hard drive.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#3
April 16, 2017 at 06:40:34
I no longer use it but from memory you can only "disable it functioning" until restart. Even then it is still ticking over as a service in the background. As you said, to properly disable it requires uninstall. That, I feel, is one of its drawbacks.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
April 16, 2017 at 10:16:28
Maybe you should ask yourself whether you really need TinyWall.

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#5
April 16, 2017 at 10:48:42
I probably don't.

What I'm trying to do is completely eliminate everything that
accesses the hard drive while I'm not using the computer, and
everything that accesses the Internet other than Firefox. That
doesn't look possible in Windows 10. Imay have to wipe out
everything I've done and install Windows 7 instead.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
April 16, 2017 at 12:40:34
"What I'm trying to do is completely eliminate everything that accesses the hard drive while I'm not using the computer, and everything that accesses the Internet other than Firefox"

Not possible unless you either shutdown the PC or disable the internet after each use. Win10 "phones home" every chance it gets. Time to learn Linux.

https://betanews.com/2016/02/06/win...


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#7
April 16, 2017 at 13:59:57
Win-10 programmed to "phone home" every chance it gets - hmmm..... That sounds like big brother M$ is snooping, monitoring and the like as a norm, and now belives it is OK to do so...

I thought they had been told not to, as it is an invasion of privacy, violation of data protection laws and the like? Afterall they, allegedly, were at in the ealier days of 9x until they got found out, and then allegedly stopped it. But that was a long time ago... Very likely such fripparies, niceties etc. dont concern them these days...


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#8
April 16, 2017 at 14:34:34
If I recall correctly, the story riider linked died off quickly because when you looked at the guy's data, it was all polling for Windows Updates, updates to the various news/weather apps in Win10, and I think some Cortana traffic as well because the guy never turned it off. I'd check it out, but the original data from said guy is gone now.

As for spying in early versions of Win9X, I wonder how you'd expect the computer to call home, seeing as the Internet wasn't a residential thing until the end of the 90's, and even then it was dial-up. It wasn't until the mid-00's that US households moved to always-on broadband Internet connections. As far as rumors go, the closest we got to claiming that MS was spying on its users was when someone found a reference to _NSAKEY. The rumor was this was part of some governmentally mandated backdoor.

Unfounded talk like this upsets me because now Microsoft IS now doing all of those things. They ARE adding advertising to Windows, they ARE enforcing telemetry reporting, the people who tried to raise the flag are being ignored, and so we've got a case of the industry who cried wolf.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#9
April 16, 2017 at 14:59:55
You can reduce a lot of MS's Windows 10 snooping by going through the settings cog.

Using TinyWall can reduce this further but I found it became a "time consuming hobby". I abandoned it when, for a period, I found it caused issues. I managed to unearth the windows file which was implicated and reported it to the author. As a result the problem was eventually fixed.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
April 16, 2017 at 15:22:06
I think it was a feature, for want of a better name, that was found in early of the variants of '9x, and more than just a remour or false flag... I seem to recall M$ owning up, claiming it was an mistake; and said it had been rectified... Strange how many folks, allegedly with more recent version of windows, have found themselves being promo'd for utilites/apps from M$ that compete with things they (the end user) already has installed. But again ithat too might just be more rumour based...

I used to have some references to this end; but they were on a system that is no longer. That system was as '98 vintage Dell, which had all variants of 9x installed, and NT and W2K.

The way it worked was along the line that if the user agreed to any form of feedback to M$ then there were open to a full report of what was on the system...

That M$ is now enforcing feedback (and who know exactly what they really find/report, and what else they're upto) and did so with win-10 from the start, and didn't apparently publicise it when win-10 was released, only admiting it when it was discovered by the more IT savvy, is nothing for them to proud of; nor acceptable in any society that claims it values and respects individual privacy...

I can see many dumping M$ and going over to Linux variants in increasing numbers; and also to a lesser degree to Mac systems. At least for now those systems seem to less monitored for whatever reasons, and by whomever; although I suspect it's only a matter of time before that changes - all in the interests of customer service, product development, and that catch all "(inter)national security"...

The flag re' M$ practices has long been waving, and they simply choose to ignore it; as for now they still dominate the market... But as just above, that may change...


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#11
April 16, 2017 at 16:54:50
Here's a couple of more recent articles about Win10 snooping:

http://www.techrepublic.com/article...

http://www.infoworld.com/article/31...


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#12
April 17, 2017 at 02:26:57
Incidentally I do share your (riider's) concerns as expresed in the parafraph in post #8. Crying wolf can and often does caused more pepblems, and also dovert attention from situations which warrant closer attention and scrutiny.

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#13
April 17, 2017 at 10:00:07
Can I do the same thing in Windows Firewall Advanced settings
that I can do with TinyWall? Again, what I'm attempting to do with
TinyWall is block (or stealth) every port except those needed by
Firefox to browse the web and download files. So far, in my very
limited use of Process Monitor, I haven't noticed that Windows
Firewall does any disk access, which is the other thing I'm trying
to eliminate.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
April 17, 2017 at 10:25:39
Can I do the same thing in Windows Firewall Advanced settings
that I can do with TinyWall?
All TinyWall does is work the Windows Firewall but with less technicalities. It is not an additional or alternative firewall like most others.

This will tell you whether your ports are stealthed:
https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2
Most likely they are, but they will still be opened by the system when needed unless you block the internet entirely.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#15
April 17, 2017 at 14:20:28
"what I'm attempting to do with TinyWall is block (or stealth) every port except those needed by Firefox to browse the web and download files"

What is it that you're so concerned about?


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