Solved How to restore BIOS memory ?

October 13, 2018 at 19:06:01
Specs: Windows 10, 4Gb
Antec Sonata 1; motherboard : Gigabyte GA X58A - UD5; BIOS : Award Software International Inc. FD 1/2/11 SM version 2.4
Since I try out all software and procedures on a clone of my system before implementing it on my permanent setup, I need to switch between my main and my trial hard drives - I do that by having those hard drives connected through a SATA power switch that selectively enables whichever hard drive I choose. That system has worked well for years, but lately I have found that the boot sequence reverts to a default of USB first, no matter how many times I select the SATA hard drive as first boot option, and then SAVE the settings. I have even reset the BIOS by leaving the motherboard battery out for a while. But the boot sequence persists in reverting to an unwanted state. How to remedy ?

Basty


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✔ Best Answer
October 14, 2018 at 04:17:31
The theoretical problem persists, but the practical solution was to make the power to the unbootable HDD switchable. If I want to access that drive, I throw the switch, and otherwise leave it unpowered - that is better for other reasons as well.

Basty



#1
October 13, 2018 at 19:58:38
The CMOS battery on the motherboard is failing & will have to be replaced. You can see it in the picture here: https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboar...
Very likely a CR2032. Make sure to unplug the power cord before swapping the battery. You will have to correct all the BIOS settings afterwards, not just boot order.

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#2
October 13, 2018 at 20:08:17
Mobo battery failing even though the clock stays accurate ?

Basty


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#3
October 13, 2018 at 21:46:26
Replacing the mobo battery with a new one improved nothing.

Basty


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Related Solutions

#4
October 13, 2018 at 21:53:42
"But the boot sequence persists in reverting to an unwanted state"
Are you using Del or F12?

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#5
October 13, 2018 at 21:58:24
I have used both.

Basty


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#6
October 13, 2018 at 22:09:25
Is the bios using the latest update?

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#7
October 13, 2018 at 22:38:45
If needed, open up your manual ( in the motherboard CD that came with the comp ) & into search put > Legacy.

Check all the references to Legacy & make sure they are set where you want them.


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#8
October 13, 2018 at 22:49:27
Thank you - I'll do that when I can.

Basty


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#9
October 13, 2018 at 23:17:57
Without instruction from 'you' I have no reason to make any changes to the settings listed in the manual.
First reference is in FirstlSecond/Third Boot Device - VERY relevant, but no reason to change.
The next two are in SATA Pon0-3 Native Mode (Intel ICH10R South Bridge) - which leave me uncomprehending.

Basty


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#10
October 14, 2018 at 00:44:51
You missed this .

"Limit CPUID Max. to 3 (Note)
Allows you to determine whether to limit CPUID maximum value. Set this item to Disabled for Windows
XP operating system; set this item to Enabled for legacy operating system such as Windows NT4.0.
(Default: Disabled)"

Make a note of all those Legacy current settings, then click on > Load Optimized Defaults.

Make sure your boot is set to what you want.

Reboot & test.



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#11
October 14, 2018 at 03:05:04
The settings were already the way you suggest they should be. I did load the optimised settings - NO improvement.

Basty


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#12
October 14, 2018 at 03:19:13
I'm out ideas for now, lets hope riider can come up with something.

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#13
October 14, 2018 at 03:23:08
Thanks for your efforts

Basty


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#14
October 14, 2018 at 04:17:31
✔ Best Answer
The theoretical problem persists, but the practical solution was to make the power to the unbootable HDD switchable. If I want to access that drive, I throw the switch, and otherwise leave it unpowered - that is better for other reasons as well.

Basty


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#15
October 20, 2018 at 19:59:35
I have been asked to select a best answer, but no answer solved my problem - not even my own last post, I have since discovered.

Basty


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#16
October 21, 2018 at 05:48:25
Why not just connect both drives permanently and use either a boot manager or your BIOS's boot menu to choose which one to boot.

So much easier than messing about with physical switches - and you don't need to keep resetting the BIOS settings.


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#17
October 21, 2018 at 08:10:05
There was no need to mention it before, but there are more than 2 HDDs involved, which makes the switch a great advantage over the arrangement that preceded it. I just want to restore function to the good way it was before the problem arose.

Basty


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#18
October 21, 2018 at 13:41:16
Whenever you change drives the BIOS is likely to change the boot order. (At least it does on my m/b.) So I think your problem is insoluble with the given constraints.

The procedure that I have outlined works perfectly well with 3 or 4 drives. As long as you have enough connectors in your computer to connect all the drives at once it's still the best solution.


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