Solved how to make Hard Drive Compatible With Both Windows & a Mac

Custom / CUSTOM
September 16, 2015 at 10:46:27
Specs: windows 10 , Intel I5/16 rams
Windows 10: I need to copy an HDD to HDD , how to make the new HDD compatible with Windows and Mac?

See More: how to make Hard Drive Compatible With Both Windows & a Mac

Report •

✔ Best Answer
September 16, 2015 at 15:37:30
A simple approach would be to share files on a usb drive, and then whichever OS is booted up would at least read them OK. Presuming that drive is ntfs then windows is read/write; Mac read for sure, probably write too via a hidden tweak (I called it a hack earlier) as per a few guides on the web (or an add-in util).

This of course presimes two computers, one PC and one Mac.. The usb drive connected to whichever as required?

An alternative is to use a networked drive for shared data. A single networked drive would be available to any computer on the network - read 'n write. However not very secure against adrive failure... So avtwo drive NAS would be wiser/safer. Using a mirror system would safeguard aganst a drive failure; would allow any computer/OS on the network access.

I have Qnaps mirrored NAS. Works fine, and my olde Acer system and my Macs (and iPad) all can access its contents to their hearts content.

The cheapest and easiest way to do what you want is to dualboot Mac and Windows using Bootcamp. Setup Mac first, then Bootcamp partition and install Windows.Then install Parallels and activate the Bootcamp Windows installation as a client in Parallels virtual machine runing in the Mac OS. This approach allows you to have both OS running at same time, and to share data fully.

Even if only running Mac OS at anytime and Windos is installed in a VM but not running... I think you can still access Windows data - if you set it up the right way.

Equally you can boot directly into Windows only if so wished - Mac OS would not then be available (its partition etc. being invisible when Windows is booting on its own).

So I sugest consider a dualboot on a Mac desgned computer, and then use Parallels to run the Bootcamp Windows inside a Mac environment. Or install Mac OS, then Parallels, then installl Windows as a client in Parallels but no dualboot (no Bbootcamp Windows).

A Parallels VM Windows inside a Mac environment will allow common access to data.

Or... Use mirror system NAS approach - which is little more expensivve (as above), but infinitely more flexible, and safee overall?

I have a Macbook running Windows in. Parallels VM, and a Mac Mini running Bootcamp Windows in a Parallels VM. Occasionally I boot directly into the Bootcamped Windows on the Mac Mini, but generally access/use it as/when in its VM.

message edited by trvlr



#1
September 16, 2015 at 11:40:41
What do you mean by "compatible?" Bootable? Meaning that you put the drive in a PC and use Windows and then put it into a MAC and try to boot to a MAC OS?

Report •

#2
September 16, 2015 at 12:58:56
Question is easily googled

http://www.macyourself.com/2012/03/...

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#3
September 16, 2015 at 13:20:18
A little clarification to start with?

Windows uses NTFS these days. Earlier versions - XP onwards - could also handle fat32; and XP also even fat(16).

Mac use the HPFS system; Windows can't use/access HPFS. Mac has limited functionality re' ntfs - although there are options there... (see below).

Macs "can" read ntfs, and allegedly current version of OSX can also even write ntfs (there is a "hack of sorts... - which I haven't yet /tried/verified...). And there are add-in utilities for Mac OSX that allow Macs to write to ntfs.

Over a network the file formats are abstracted; i.e. they don't enter into the equation/considerations i.e. Windows and Mac can see/access each other's drive contents.

If the ntfs drive is connected to Mac system via usb it "can" be accessed (and as above possibly written too as well).

If you wish to dual boot windows and Mac OSX then you need Bootcamp (free with Mac OSX) which creates a separate partition for Windows. This is usually on the same drive as the Mac OS but I "think" it also works with a second hard drive; Mac would be the master/boot drive. However I haven't gone that route (2 drives) - yet...

With a single drive - one creates a Mac system first...; then uses Bootcamp... Once setup correctly and Windows installed - one can choose which OS to boot variously...

Windows can also be run within Mac OSX in Virtual Machine; Parallels is one such VM utility. In a VM scenario data can be shared between the two operating systems. In a dual boot I think you can only access the data on the drive/partition booted...

Allegedly one "can" install Mac OSX on a PC designed for Windows; but I seem to recall reading that isn't always successful. Drivers may not available and the system generally a PAI to set up. Whereas - via Bootcamp - one can install Windows on Mac designed computer - and thus dual boot. (Presumably one might even install Windows directly to a Mac designed system - which has no Mac OS installed? Again I haven't tried that.)

So what are you hoping to achieve; and what with; a PC or a Mac as a starting system/box?

There is plethora of information "out there (Skully)" re' Macs and ntfs - access/read; and also write - with or without ad-in utils...

message edited by trvlr


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 16, 2015 at 14:56:53
Thanks, basically I want to be able to open, play, modify, etc my files with windows and/or mac. because I still don't understand the cloning, I believed that "copy and paste " will do the job, but since it is around 2.75 tb of files, how to do it faster than normal?

Report •

#5
September 16, 2015 at 15:37:30
✔ Best Answer
A simple approach would be to share files on a usb drive, and then whichever OS is booted up would at least read them OK. Presuming that drive is ntfs then windows is read/write; Mac read for sure, probably write too via a hidden tweak (I called it a hack earlier) as per a few guides on the web (or an add-in util).

This of course presimes two computers, one PC and one Mac.. The usb drive connected to whichever as required?

An alternative is to use a networked drive for shared data. A single networked drive would be available to any computer on the network - read 'n write. However not very secure against adrive failure... So avtwo drive NAS would be wiser/safer. Using a mirror system would safeguard aganst a drive failure; would allow any computer/OS on the network access.

I have Qnaps mirrored NAS. Works fine, and my olde Acer system and my Macs (and iPad) all can access its contents to their hearts content.

The cheapest and easiest way to do what you want is to dualboot Mac and Windows using Bootcamp. Setup Mac first, then Bootcamp partition and install Windows.Then install Parallels and activate the Bootcamp Windows installation as a client in Parallels virtual machine runing in the Mac OS. This approach allows you to have both OS running at same time, and to share data fully.

Even if only running Mac OS at anytime and Windos is installed in a VM but not running... I think you can still access Windows data - if you set it up the right way.

Equally you can boot directly into Windows only if so wished - Mac OS would not then be available (its partition etc. being invisible when Windows is booting on its own).

So I sugest consider a dualboot on a Mac desgned computer, and then use Parallels to run the Bootcamp Windows inside a Mac environment. Or install Mac OS, then Parallels, then installl Windows as a client in Parallels but no dualboot (no Bbootcamp Windows).

A Parallels VM Windows inside a Mac environment will allow common access to data.

Or... Use mirror system NAS approach - which is little more expensivve (as above), but infinitely more flexible, and safee overall?

I have a Macbook running Windows in. Parallels VM, and a Mac Mini running Bootcamp Windows in a Parallels VM. Occasionally I boot directly into the Bootcamped Windows on the Mac Mini, but generally access/use it as/when in its VM.

message edited by trvlr


Report •

Ask Question