Solved How to delete In-private browsing history in Windows 10

November 29, 2015 at 10:31:33
Specs: Windows 7
I want to locate and shred files /folders of "in private" browser history in Windows 10. Permanently delete files and folders from the browser while using "in private"

See More: How to delete In-private browsing history in Windows 10

Report •

✔ Best Answer
November 30, 2015 at 20:08:47
After the files have gone it is not easy to locate where they once resided on the HD. All you can do is overwrite sufficient blank space in the hope that you've cleared the traces, which could take ages.

Bear in mind that most folk wouldn't know how to start to find these remnants on your computer, only geeky/techie types.

To do what you're asking can be done but it requires expensive software. It has to find the locations (complex) then overwrite them, ideally multiple times, with random 0's and 1's.

See this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_...

Here are some choices but they are far from 100%:
https://www.google.co.uk/#q=full+fi...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek



#1
November 29, 2015 at 13:12:30
"End of Session
http://smallbusiness.chron.com/can-...
At the end of an InPrivate browsing session, Internet Explorer deletes all of the data you accumulated during the session. These include the various tracking cookies that your computer picked up while you were browsing. Internet Explorer switches back to your non-private set of cookies, so tracking services will only see records of the sites you visited outside of your InPrivate browsing sessions."

Report •

#2
November 29, 2015 at 13:32:12
thank you for your reply. I hope I am not repeating an earlier attempt to reply. I am still confused as I do not understand if IE deletion of the files is the same as shredding them or if they could still be recovered by special software/procedure? Are they gone/deleted for good? I appreciate your taking the time to answer.

Report •

#3
November 29, 2015 at 14:31:00
"shredding them"
Shredding is different to deleting.

" or if they could still be recovered by special software/procedure?"
Yes.

"Are they gone/deleted for good?"
No.
Big hammer is the only way.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
November 29, 2015 at 18:58:25
If you use CCleaner you can go to "Tools" then "Drive Wiper" and do a 'Free
Space Wipe". Be sure and use that one and not the other as you will wipe
your entire drive.

I used to use this with a before and after check with Recuva and it does a pretty
good job. Like JohnW said a hammer is probably the only 100% method.

The wipe will keep the normal noisy person from finding anything you don't
want them to se.

Take Care
Deke


Report •

#5
November 30, 2015 at 12:20:04
When any files are deleted from a computer, all it does is stop access to them (ie. they "look" as if they are not there and you can re-use the space). However, until that area of the drive has been re-used then they can be recovered with inexpensive software. It is also possible to recover some information from overwritten areas using the sort of ambitious software the FBI use to track criminal acts.

So in summary:-

To stop the ordinary Joe Blogs from seeing them, delete is fine.

To stop the more techie types finding them you use a program which does multiple random overwrites - there are even freebies around such as "Eraser".

To fully erase things like criminal acts then you need very expensive programs and you can bet your bottom dollar the cops will have bigger and better ones.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#6
November 30, 2015 at 19:07:57
it appears I don't know the proper procedure here but I hope this is read. thanks much for all the input. I understand better now. if "in private" deletes the history after the session, how can I locate the files to wipe them or shred or whatever? I do not want to shred my whole disk. any suggestions on some informative reading on this subject? no criminal acts, just need more than a "delete" level of privacy. thanks

message edited by refish59602


Report •

#7
November 30, 2015 at 20:08:47
✔ Best Answer
After the files have gone it is not easy to locate where they once resided on the HD. All you can do is overwrite sufficient blank space in the hope that you've cleared the traces, which could take ages.

Bear in mind that most folk wouldn't know how to start to find these remnants on your computer, only geeky/techie types.

To do what you're asking can be done but it requires expensive software. It has to find the locations (complex) then overwrite them, ideally multiple times, with random 0's and 1's.

See this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_...

Here are some choices but they are far from 100%:
https://www.google.co.uk/#q=full+fi...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

Ask Question