How to burn MP3 zipped file to CD-R disc

December 2, 2017 at 14:08:55
Specs: Windows 10
When I purchased a music album on the seller's website, I thought I was going to get in the mail a CD. Instead, I had to download my purchase and it became a MP3 zipped file. I can play it on my computer, but I want to hear it from a CD played on any CD player. I have Windows 10 OS. If this can be achieved, what EXACT steps do I take to make it happen? Keep in mind that I only know enough about computer technology to be dangerous (mostly to myself). Thanks.

See More: How to burn MP3 zipped file to CD-R disc

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
December 2, 2017 at 14:59:20
Not all domestic players can handle mp3s (which are compressed files).

If you want to keep it simple download this free disc burner. It is easy to use and almost self explanatory.
It does both CDs and DVDs.
https://cdburnerxp.se/en/home

Install it, insert a blank CD-R and choose "Audio disc". You might have to tell it to close the session afterwards because some DVD players will not play discs that have been kept open to add more later.

EDIT: If the file is still within a zip folder then copy it somewhere first so that it becomes an mp4 again before using it to burn an audio disc.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
December 2, 2017 at 21:12:59
Thanks, Derek for your response. Per your instructions I downloaded the CD burner app. After it was downloaded, I inserted a CD-R disc in my computer's player. I selected "Audio disc" and a work screen came up (I guess that's what you call it). I selected the master file that contains three files, each of which is a different album. The titles of the albums appeared in the work screen area. And that's as far as I got. There were no directions on where to go from there. Since I'm techno illiterate, I couldn't figure out the next step.

Reply ↓  Report •

#3
December 3, 2017 at 06:51:03
It's difficult to quite imagine what you are describing. Best bet is to first copy all the mp4 mp3 files into a folder on your computer and make sure they are all there.

When you run the program click your way around to find the folder and then add the files into the program. Maybe this will help:
https://cdburnerxp.se/help/Audio/co...

It's easy once you get the hang of it.

EDIT:
Ooops, I said mp4 when I meant mp3.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 3, 2017 at 07:18:01
I had to go to Windows Help to find out how to change an MP3 to an MP4. Unfortunately, the terminology was above my understanding. So I fooled around and somehow lucked upon the Extract Files function and tried that. Then I sent each individual song tract to the library. From there I figured out how to put them in the burn list. I tried burning them to a CD disc and guess what---it worked! Don't ask me the steps I used to get to that point. It was purely accidentally unintended. But I do appreciate and thank you for your help.

Reply ↓  Report •

#5
December 3, 2017 at 12:31:48
Don't know what you meant by "MP3 to an MP4" (MP3s are audio, MP4s are videos) but you were not helped by me getting it wrong in #3 - now corrected. As the files were compressed (zip) then extracting them from the zip was the right thing to do. The individual mp3 files are then put on the burn list, which is what you did.

Next time it will be easier. Good to hear you sorted it and thanks for letting us know.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
December 3, 2017 at 15:00:59
Your i ntial post was that the mp3 file was a zipped file. That means the collection of mp3 were comprssed into one file - a zip file.

They come in two types; one is self extracting and usually has a suffix .exe at the end of file name. But not always I have noted recently..

Self extracting zip files unzip/uncompress themselves by simply clickingon the zip file.

Non self-extracting zip files require a utilty to extract/uncompress them. I think current windows includes such a utilty these days?

You dun the right operation by using the extract operation.


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
December 3, 2017 at 15:31:10
trvlr

On Windows 10 a zip file appears as a folder (special icon showing a vertical zip fastener). You can view the contents, play audio or video but cannot burn them from there. However, you can extract them by simply copying them out of the zip folder into, say, an ordinary folder from where they can then be burnt. No need for Winzip program or whatever.

To compress files you use "Send to" and choose "Compressed (zipped) folder".

So, Windows 10 does have some useful things after all LOL.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
December 3, 2017 at 15:36:32
After all these years... M$ finally recognises zip files and includes a "ewesphool tule" for them in wyndoze...

tak Derek... have an extra (small) tot of sherry...


Reply ↓  Report •

#9
December 3, 2017 at 15:44:36
ClannBill

I should have said that there is also a right click Extract facility for zipped files (most things can be done several ways in computers). Here's the full info:
http://www.simplehow.tips/a/56/how-...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

#10
December 3, 2017 at 17:31:02
Derek,
Thanks for the info. However, unless it is sent to me from another source, like the merchant who sent me the music albums in a zipped file, it is very unlikely that there will ever be zipped files on my puter. I have more than enough memory or disc space to put everything that I'll ever use in regular files. A little history about me might explain that. Before 1997, I did all my work on a typewriter (manual or electric it didn't matter). I worked for the State of Missouri and all of a sudden my department got a whole lot of money. Instead of gearing it toward salaries, it went into computers, which they demanded we all use. They figured by that time everyone had a working knowledge of the beasties. Nope. Not I. I had to call our folks at the state capitol and ask them how to turn the lap top on. Before they handed me the puter I had never touched one in my life, much less have a working knowledge. Then they bought this program to replace our physical client files and programs to file claims for our clients. I was the only one who maintained and kept the physical files. It came in handy a few years down the road when the system crashed and while everyone was working themselves to death trying to reconstruct client files, I had everything I needed in my file cabinets. I only had to update info as needed when I dealt with a client. By the time I retired (ten years later) I could still complete a claim to the VA faster on the typewriter than on the puter (which automatically brought up stored info on the claim form). I maintained then, and still do to this day, that the best way to deal with puter beasties, is to use the electrician's motto---"With one hand in your pocket so you'll stay grounded and not get electrocuted." So that's basically where I'm at concerning computers. Why do I use one? I found a way to bypass Microsoft Excell to keep track of my bills and finances by making my own tables.And I use it as a word processor and for e-mail since I'm a writer and most literary agents and/or publishers want stuff sent to them by e-mail. It that were not the case I'd still be writing my books and other written materials on a typewriter.
That being said, I'm extremely grateful for you and all the others who've had patience with this old rough log in a smooth log world.

Reply ↓  Report •

#11
December 3, 2017 at 18:01:19
How nice it is to get a thank you note. Not many do these days.

Regards


Reply ↓  Report •

#12
December 3, 2017 at 18:06:25
Glad to have helped.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question