How to boot Windows 10 in airplane mode?

May 23, 2020 at 02:17:21
Specs: several
Is there a way to set Windows 10 so that it always boots in
airplane mode, with all radios turned off?

Edit to add:

Since Airplane mode isn't completely reliable (the Airplane Mode
indicator can be "on" (not grey) yet the radios still work), what I'm
asking for is to have all radios turned off when Windows boots.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#1
May 23, 2020 at 02:56:41
Other than enabling it just before you shut down, I'm not sure that there is any way to do this.

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#2
May 23, 2020 at 03:02:38
ijack,

I was adding the edit when you posted just now.

It is a problem only if I forget to turn off WiFi before shutting down,
or if the computer hangs while I am online, so I have to restart.

The fact that the Airplane Mode button isn't reliable is only an
annoyance, but it has annoyed many other Windows 10 users.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#3
May 23, 2020 at 11:04:29
May I ask why you want to set Airplane Mode as a default? Just curious.


message edited by DerbyDad03


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#4
May 24, 2020 at 00:16:08
There is no reason for the radio to be broadcasting and
trying to connect to the Internet if that isn't what I want it
to do. The only clue that it is doing such a thing is the
little icon in the corner of the screen. (I used to have a
modem with blinking lights on it, plus an onscreen icon
that blinked whenever data was transferred. That was
much more visible.)

Besides, I have a lot of neighbors with WiFi. After the
first several, any WiFi radio turned on is a reduction in
bandwidth for everyone else nearby.

I often use the computer 12-15 hours per day, of which
maybe two hours is connected to the Internet.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
May 24, 2020 at 16:16:38
re: "Besides, I have a lot of neighbors with WiFi. After the first several, any WiFi radio turned on is a reduction in bandwidth for everyone else nearby.

I often use the computer 12-15 hours per day, of which maybe two hours is connected to the Internet"

So, if I understand those comments correctly, you feel that you will negatively impact the internet experience of all of your neighbors if you leave your computer connected to the internet, even though you aren't purposely, actively using that connection.

You're just trying to be a good neighbor. Is that it?

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#6
May 25, 2020 at 00:35:56
That is a small part of it. Not my primary motivation, but
definitely a motivation. If I look through the list of WiFi
signals I'm receiving, I can count over 60 of them.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#7
May 25, 2020 at 14:14:35
I guess I still don't know why that matters to you. Imagine if you could see every device that uses each of those routers.

Take those 60 WiFi names and multiply it by the number of occupants of each location where a router exists. Give each one a smartphone and one or 2 tablets or smartwatches, etc. Perhaps a Nest thermostat, a couple of Echo Dots, a WiFi soundbar, smart bulbs, etc.

Is it that you can see the names of all the routers that has you focused on them?

You mentioned that you only access the Internet with your PC for a couple of hours a day. I'm guessing that you don't use your smartphone constantly. Do you also have that boot in Airplane Mode?

What is your main motivation for this exercise? What impact is keeping your single Win 10 PC off line going to make?

Again, just curious.

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#8
May 25, 2020 at 16:52:04
Dear Again,

> Imagine if you could see every device that uses each of those routers.

Okay.

> Take those 60 WiFi names and multiply it by the number of occupants
> of each location where a router exists. Give each one a smartphone
> and one or 2 tablets or smartwatches, etc. Perhaps a Nest thermostat,
> a couple of Echo Dots, a WiFi soundbar, smart bulbs, etc.

Okay....

> Is it that you can see the names of all the routers that has you
> focused on them?

What do you mean by "focused on them"?

> You mentioned that you only access the Internet with your PC for a
> couple of hours a day. I'm guessing that you don't use your smartphone
> constantly. Do you also have that boot in Airplane Mode?

Although I do have a smartphone, I haven't ever used it.
It hasn't been activated yet. Heh.

> What is your main motivation for this exercise?

My main motivation is that I don't leave things running if I'm
not using them. This isn't an exercise, it is as basic as turning
the heat off when the weather gets warm. A no-brainer.

I would expect that having the computer boot with the radios
turned off would be the default, since it doesn't require doing
anything-- just don't turn them on. And I'd expect that it would
be a simple change to make to a setting somewhere, even if
it isn't a frequently-used one.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
May 25, 2020 at 18:58:31
re: "What do you mean by "focused on them"?"

In an earlier post you said:

"I have a lot of neighbors with WiFi. After the first several, any WiFi radio turned on is a reduction in bandwidth for everyone else nearby."

Then you said: "If I look through the list of WiFi signals I'm receiving, I can count over 60 of them."

Therefore, from where I'm sitting - and that's the only viewpoint I have until I can understand yours - you seem (to me) to be very concerned by all the (what I think you are calling) unnecessary network traffic caused by routers that don't need to be broadcasting. However, you don't seem concerned by (or at least haven't mentioned) all the other devices, especially smartphones, that are constantly sending and receiving data when they could just as well be idle.

Now, with that said, I'll admit that my questions and comments might not make sense to you because you understand where you are coming from and I don't. I don't understanding why it matters to you that you can count over 60 routers. I assume that's what you mean when you say "WiFi signals I'm receiving". I'm assuming you mean that you are seeing the names of all the WiFi routers that a broadcasting their name and that you could connect to if they are Open or if you knew the password. If that's not what you mean, then please set me straight. If that is what you mean, then please tell my why that makes you want to boot in Airplane mode.

What issue, related to those 60 routers, will that solve other than of course taking you off the list?

Edit: My error: This last question is not worded correctly. Booting your Win 10 machine in Airplane mode will not take your router off the list. You PC is not on that list.

message edited by DerbyDad03


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#10
May 26, 2020 at 03:42:03
> re: "What do you mean by "focused on them"?"
> In an earlier post you said:
>
> "I have a lot of neighbors with WiFi. After the first several,
> any WiFi radio turned on is a reduction in bandwidth for
> everyone else nearby."
>
> Then you said: "If I look through the list of WiFi signals I'm
> receiving, I can count over 60 of them."
>
> Therefore, from where I'm sitting - and that's the only
> viewpoint I have until I can understand yours - you seem
> (to me) to be very concerned by all the (what I think you
> are calling) unnecessary network traffic caused by routers
> that don't need to be broadcasting. However, you don't
> seem concerned by (or at least haven't mentioned) all
> the other devices, especially smartphones, that are
> constantly sending and receiving data when they could
> just as well be idle.

I'm trying to do something about the device I have (this
computer), not everyone else's. It is like wearing a mask
to protect everyone else from the COVID-19 virus. I'm not
planning to go around trying to put masks on other people,
but I could wear a mask myself when I'm around others.

That much seems completely obvious, so I am at least as
mystified by your mystification as you are by my "focus" on
the routers.

> Now, with that said, I'll admit that my questions and
> comments might not make sense to you because you
> understand where you are coming from and I don't.
> I don't understand why it matters to you that you can
> count over 60 routers.

It just shows that there is a huge amount of radio traffic
here. Each one takes up some bandwidth (obviously),
and adding one more takes up a bit more bandwidth
(obviously), and with so many, they will be trying to use
the same channels at the same time (obviously), slowing
down at least some of them. (Obviously.)

I didn't think it was an important point, but I thought it was
one that would be completely understandable to you and
other readers here, so I wouldn't have to explain it.

Does that make sense to you? Does it explain my "focus"?

> I assume that's what you mean when you say "WiFi signals
> I'm receiving". I'm assuming you mean that you are seeing
> the names of all the WiFi routers that are broadcasting their
> name and that you could connect to if they are Open or if
> you knew the password. If that's not what you mean, then
> please set me straight.

Yes, of course that's what I mean. Seems obvious.

> If that is what you mean, then please tell my why that makes
> you want to boot in Airplane mode.

As I said, it is one reason for not having the radios running
all the time, and if WiFi is turned on at boot, then it could be
running all the time. Or at least until I notice and turn it off.
As I also said, this doesn't happen often. Okay, it happens
very rarely. But it is surprising to me that the default would
be to turn the WiFi on at boot if it was on when the computer
locked up and the only thing I could do was reboot. That
has happened maybe four or five times since I got the
computer in 2016. So yeah, very rarely.

> What issue, related to those 60 routers, will that solve,
> other than of course taking you off the list?

I recycle as much of the paper, plastics, metal, and glass
that I use as possible. What issue will that solve? Same
idea, same type of problem, similar type of solution. I'm
not going to save the world by doing that, but I make the
effort to do it anyway. You should see the enormous
heaps of recycleables I and my neighbors generate and
collect. Two huge, overflowing dumpsters, twice a week.
It is always more than the amount of trash.

Turning the WiFi back on automatically at boot after a
crash is like having a bank vault door open automatically
when the power comes back on after a power outage.
That might be exactly what you want, but probably not.
There should be a setting somewhere to control it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
May 26, 2020 at 03:49:54
Sometime early in this thread -- maybe when I was
writing the original post -- I thought about the actual
primary function of "airplane mode": to turn off radios
while on an airplane. If I want to use my laptop on an
airplane, but can't have the radio on, but it boots by
default with the WiFi turned on if it was on when I last
shut the computer off....

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#12
May 26, 2020 at 05:05:56
It is true that your internet usage will affect your neighbours, but that would require that you stream, play online or download etc.. You would need to have a pretty slow connection for it to be a problem even for others on your own line.

But if you really want to disable it anyway you could make a tiny batch script and drop it in the startup folder or schedule it with task scheduler:

Batch(save as .cmd):

netsh interface set interface ethernet disable
echo Network adapter has been disabled!

PowerShell(save as .ps1):

Disable-NetAdapter -Name "Ethernet" -Confirm:$false
Write-Host "Network adapter has been disabled!"

this command will need admin privs to work, and you should change "ethernet" with your network adapter name. and replace disable with enable to enable it again(or just go to control panel)

As for monitoring your internet usage, i would recommend rainmeter: https://www.rainmeter.net/

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#13
May 26, 2020 at 05:41:02
I made an error when I asked this question:

"What issue, related to those 60 routers, will that solve other than of course taking you off the list?"

Putting your PC in Airplane Mode will certainly prevent traffic from your PC to your router and then beyond, but your router will still be sending and receiving traffic to/from the internet. In other words, it will still be on the list for everyone else to see.

re: " It is like wearing a mask to protect everyone else from the COVID-19 virus. I'm not planning to go around trying to put masks on other people, but I could wear a mask myself when I'm around others."

It seems like putting your PC in Airplane mode is similar to putting on a mask but leaving one nostril exposed. Shouldn't you be covering that nostril by turning off your router?

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#14
May 26, 2020 at 21:33:42
This should be posted as a new thread not tacked on to an existing thread belonging to another poster.

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#15
May 27, 2020 at 14:07:06
Ewen,

Interesting self-reference! An Eternal Golden Braid!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#16
May 27, 2020 at 14:30:42
DerbyDad03 opined:

> Shouldn't you be covering that nostril by turning off your router?

I always turn off the router, if I don't forget to. First I turn off the
computer WiFi, then I turn off the router. But, as I said, in those
rare but less-rare-than-they-should-be circumstances when either
I forget to turn off the computer WiFi or the computer locks up
while I'm connected, then the computer will start broadcasting
again when I reboot.

HOWEVER...

Irony of ironies...

It appears that I have been forced by circumstances not entirely
out of my control (but influenced by the current virus craze, so I
have a little bit of an excuse... not much...) to switch to a different
ISP, which uses a different modem/router, and this one has
Ethernet ports on it, so I don't need to use WiFi at all anymore.

I'll keep checking the old ISP for a few days to see if it comes
back to life, but right now I'm communicating over a cat5e cable.
Which would be a bit less clutzy if it were about twice as long.
Tripping or hanging hazard as it is now...

At least I got to use a lot of ellipses....

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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