How To Block (Not Pause) Win 10 Updates

Dell / Inspiron one 2320
March 8, 2020 at 10:02:21
Specs: Windows 10, I5-9400
I just read an article that states that KB4535996 is causing all sorts of boot, video and audio problems. That update has yet to be installed on my machine, so for the time being I have paused updates for the maximum time allowed. 35 days. However, if I understand the Pause feature correctly, I will not be able to pause updates again until all available updates have been installed.

The article states "You can also download Windows Update troubleshooter, which will enable you to block KB4535996 proactively / stop it from reinstalling."

I ran the troubleshooter and I did not see an option to block updates. Is the article wrong? Can we not actually block a specific update?

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gordon...

Thanks.

message edited by DerbyDad03


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#1
March 8, 2020 at 11:13:31
See is the link is of any help:

https://www.howtogeek.com/223864/ho...


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#2
March 8, 2020 at 12:59:23
FWIW MS very quickly pull updates which cause serious issues, so your 35 days setting should be OK.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
March 8, 2020 at 13:20:37
trvlr: Your link helped, although not directly.

AFAICT that page mainly discusses how to hide updates that have already been installed. It explains how to roll-back a problematic update and then hide it so that it doesn't reinstall automatically. From what I understand, KB4535996 has, in some cases, preventing machines from even booting up, which could make rolling the update back somewhat difficult. :-0

However, there was a link on that page explaining how to "trick" Windows into asking before it downloads any updates:

https://www.howtogeek.com/224471/ho...

For the time being, I've set my wired Ethernet connection to "Metered". That will prevent automatic downloads, allowing me to pick and choose which updates I'll let Windows install. I know this is risky and I'll be monitoring the KB4535996 situation to see if MS makes changes, although at this point they haven't even admitted to there being an issue.

Known issues in this update
Microsoft is not currently aware of any issues with this update.

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#4
March 8, 2020 at 13:39:45
MS can go mighty quiet when they produce a buggy update but they often stop dishing it out at the same time. New update numbers often confuse things too.

Yeah, that metered connection is one way around things. There are various methods around to stop MS Updates (registry and group policy) but as MS keep changing the system I am never sure if unofficial fixes are secure.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#5
March 8, 2020 at 14:29:17
re: "MS can go mighty quiet when they produce a buggy update but they often stop dishing it out at the same time. New update numbers often confuse things too."

When I first read the article, I checked my updates to see if it had been installed yet. It had not, but my system told me that it was available and offered me the opportunity to install it. I graciously declined the offer.

It was the only update that was offered, so either they haven't released a fix for KB4535996 yet or they've stopped actively pushing it out. Perhaps it won't actually let me install it, but I'm not going to play guinea pig and test that.

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#6
March 8, 2020 at 18:13:19
Ack! Thppt! (anybody remember Bill the Cat?)

Outlook 2019 doesn't like a metered connection. It wants to work off-line to "save charges".

It offers a "Connect Anyway" option, but then has trouble connecting to some of my email address, especially my Gmail accounts.

I've got updates paused for a few weeks, so I've got time to figure this out. Meanwhile "Metered Connection" has been turned off. What a PITA.

How To Post Data or Code ---> Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code


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#7
March 8, 2020 at 18:38:24
Bill the cat?..

has trouble connecting to some of my email address, especially my Gmail accounts

That might be due to NSA and others monitoring your accounts to see if you’re involved in any race phyxing games... Price of being a champion Soap Box Derby winner (or the parent or sponsor of one...)

Wyche having sed... the more I read about win-10 the more I feel disInclined to go anywhere near it. M$-land seem to focus on how to screw up something related to it each day. Not aware of Linux developers doing that, nor Apple-land either. Although the latter have removed one or two favoured and useful items over the last few years; and hidden, from mere mortal access/view, features which are often still used; and thus one has to hunt for them - usually after a trawl for tips to that end on the web...

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#8
March 8, 2020 at 19:25:44
"I just read an article that states that KB4535996"
Every single update will cause a % of users a problem.
The silent majority never need to post.
I have all the latest updates, nil problems. Once auto updates offer a new file, I install it.
https://i.imgur.com/b57pzjE.gif


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#9
March 13, 2020 at 06:32:02
Maybe it's better to spend time fixing issues that actually occur, instead of spending time to fix issues that are not actually on your machine.

If you suspect a bad patch to be installed, just pause for a while, and you'll be fine.

What do you expect, Windows to not boot anymore, 35 days after such a bad patch has been released ?

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#10
March 13, 2020 at 08:28:20
"Maybe it's better to spend time fixing issues that actually occur, instead of spending time to fix issues that are not actually on your machine."

The patch is known to possibly prevent the machine from booting. How would you suggest a user with that issue "fix" it?

What do you expect, Windows to not boot anymore, 35 days after such a bad patch has been released?

Explain your question.

Are you asking if I expect Windows not to boot 35 days after the bad patch has been released or 35 days after it has been installed? Those are 2 very different situations.

If it's a bad patch, I expect it to become a problem once it's been installed, even if it's a year after it has been released. The release date has nothing to do with it.

(I say this with the assumption that MS does not fix a patch and then re-release it with the same number. My expectation is that the "fixed patch" would have a new number.)

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#11
March 13, 2020 at 11:23:16
Microsoft would either post an Important patch to repair the old patch or make the old one disapear from their system and a new patch to replace it which would also repair and possible issues with the old one if installed.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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