Solved How do I format a CD or CDRW so that it is a blank Audio CD?

October 4, 2016 at 15:47:50
Specs: Windows 10
My Digital recorder requires blank CD or CDRW Audio- formatted disks. How can I create such a disk from blank CDs?

See More: How do I format a CD or CDRW so that it is a blank Audio CD?

Report •

✔ Best Answer
October 4, 2016 at 21:26:27
"Even though general purpose CD-R and CD-RW discs and their consumer audio versions appear for all practical purposes identical, only blank media bearing the “Compact Disc Digital Audio Recordable” (CD-DA Recordable) and “Compact Disc Digital Audio Rewritable” (CD-DA Rewritable) logos can be written in consumer audio recorders. The reason for this restriction is to comply with international copyright agreements. A special Disc Application Code present in the ATIP information of a CD-DA Recordable/Rewritable disc’s pregroove wobble identifies it specifically for audio use. Consumer audio recorders are programmed to reject discs not containing the correct code."

http://www.osta.org/technology/cdqa...



#1
October 4, 2016 at 16:44:26
If your trying to create an audio CD, then you don't format it, your burning software will know what to do and finalize the disc when it's done writing the files to the disc.

If you want to make a data CD with mp3 files on it, you still shouldn't need to format it. Formating should only be done if you plan on writing mulitsessions to the disc. And many players won't read the disc if it's multisession and the disc hasn't been finalized.

Now when you say your digital recorder requires Audio formatted CD's, usually this means you need to buy discs that are specifically for recording audio. These discs cost a little more because they reserve some of the cost for paying royalties to the artists. They also have some sort of code written on them that lets your recorder know it's a disc made for recording music.You can pick up these discs at larger electronic stores.

message edited by THX 1138


Report •

#2
October 4, 2016 at 17:04:54
Data discs work just as well as audio discs. Best to avoid CD-RW or CD+RW (rewritable) because they can be troublesome. Use CD-R, CD+R, or Audio Discs and your Digital Recorder will do the rest.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#3
October 4, 2016 at 19:47:55
I tried to phrase my question to make it clear that I am not talking about how to copy digital files from my PC to a CD. I know how to do that. My standalone CD recorder (RCA CDRW121) will NOT write to an unformatted CD. It requires a CD or CD-RW formatted for audio.They are called CD-R Music CDs. I have purchased such CDs in the past, but I have a project that I need to accomplish quickly and live in a rural area where I can't just run down to the local store and purchase audio-formatted CDs. THX, you may be right - I will have to purchase these - I was just hoping that there was a way I could create these blank audio disks myself. Amazon is probably the solution.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
October 4, 2016 at 21:22:41
Unfortunately it isn't something you can format on your own. Yeah Amazon is probably your best bet. I was going to suggest Amazon Prime but living in rural area, you may not have that option.

Report •

#5
October 4, 2016 at 21:26:27
✔ Best Answer
"Even though general purpose CD-R and CD-RW discs and their consumer audio versions appear for all practical purposes identical, only blank media bearing the “Compact Disc Digital Audio Recordable” (CD-DA Recordable) and “Compact Disc Digital Audio Rewritable” (CD-DA Rewritable) logos can be written in consumer audio recorders. The reason for this restriction is to comply with international copyright agreements. A special Disc Application Code present in the ATIP information of a CD-DA Recordable/Rewritable disc’s pregroove wobble identifies it specifically for audio use. Consumer audio recorders are programmed to reject discs not containing the correct code."

http://www.osta.org/technology/cdqa...


Report •

#6
October 4, 2016 at 23:06:14
Thanks, Guys, for the information. I orderd the Audio CDs with Amazon Prime.

Report •

#7
October 5, 2016 at 05:23:24
DoctorG
Excuse the aside.

riider
I have audio discs produced by the computer on ordinary CD-Rs and they play fine on anything including in the car. Just to check my understanding, are you saying that audio discs cannot be produced on domestic equipment using CD-Rs and that you have to use Audio discs? If so is this something that has come along with newer domestic CD writers? Thanks.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#8
October 5, 2016 at 10:49:40
I didn't write the rules, I just posted the info. It refers to stand-alone CD recorders, not CD burners in computers. It seems to me a computer can be used to create whatever it is that's being copied without the need for special audio CDs. Stand-alones are old tech from over 10 years ago.

http://www.head-fi.org/products/rca...

@DoctorG, do you understand that you do not have to copy directly from disc to disc? If you use your computer & only have one burner, the data is copied to a temp file & when it's complete, you'd be prompted to remove the source disc & insert a blank disc to be copied to.


Report •

#9
October 5, 2016 at 11:45:56
OK, thanks riider - makes sense.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#10
October 5, 2016 at 12:28:12
I understand all the PC "stuff" about creating CDs from digital files. I am using a standalone CD recorder that can copy CDs disk-to-disk or from external digital and analog sources. At this time, I'm trying to copy a long cassette tape to CD and felt this was a more direct route than using my PC. I'm hoping it will automatically create individual tracks as it copies the audio. I have the software necessary to work with the resulting digital file(s), if necessary. I was pretty sure that the capability to create Music-formatted CDs using a PC does not exist or is not straight-forward; I just wanted to be sure I had not missed something.

Report •

#11
October 5, 2016 at 13:13:14
Off the top of my head I would have thought it would produce one large file because the only way it could recognise where to split tracks would be after a period of silence. This would seem dubious because some music could have silent parts within a track.

Music formatted CDs can be produced on a computer "from files". They would have to be produced by recording them from the tape (or by playing the CD you produce) using something like this on the computer:
http://www.fridgesoft.de/harddiskog...
I use it on Windows 10. To get tracks you would have to record each one individually. They could then be used to produce an audio CD using software, such as this:
https://cdburnerxp.se/en/home

The above are just ideas. Fairly easy to do but a bit time consuming.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#12
October 5, 2016 at 14:23:46
Derek, What you have said is true.Some users might not be aware of these details. From reading the manual for the recorder, I surmised that with the analog source the recorder would probably not be able to split the stream into tracks. I expect that I will have to load the digital file into my PC and split out the tracks.

Thanks for the software suggestion. I have software that will do this - I was hoping that the CD recorder would be easier than tying up my PC for the hour or so it takes to do the recording.


Report •

#13
October 8, 2016 at 07:53:22
Is it a homemade audio cassette (mix?) or just an old school, store bought audio cassette? If it's the latter, all you'd have to do is find the digital format online, download it, then burn as an audio CD. The .mp3 files will be automatically converted to .CDA format

Report •

#14
October 8, 2016 at 13:22:45
The cassette was a fairly old one that had 13 songs. Side A was split-track, with vocals on one track and instruments on the other. Side B was stereo instrumental accompaniment. I was able to get Cd-audio disks form Amazon in 2 days, and record the songs on 2 CDs, which resulted in one long track on each CD that I split into separate tracks and cleaned up some tape crosstalk and hiss on my PC.

Report •

#15
October 8, 2016 at 13:27:27
Good to hear and thanks for letting us know.

message edited by Derek


Report •

Ask Question