Solved How can I reliably connect to wifi?

Dell / Inspiron 530
April 11, 2019 at 17:27:10
Specs: Microsoft Windows 10 Home, 3.3 GHz / 32GB
My desktop computer for the first few years I had it would boot up and connect to wifi reliably. In recent months it connects at boot up about half of the time. On those occasions when it does not connect immediately at boot up, it will connect about 53 seconds after the desktop shows on the display. During the 53 second delay, I can manually connect to my wifi and all is well.

I have a couple of other Windows 10 computers on my wifi and they connect at boot up without delays.

What has changed in recent months (possibly as far back as the latter part of 2018) to cause this delay? Possibly one of the Windows updates? What can I do to rid myself of the not-all-the-time wifi connect delay?

Steve


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✔ Best Answer
May 21, 2019 at 12:49:16
It turned out this way: I gave up on trying to troubleshoot the TP-Link TL-WN851ND wifi card. A work computer needs to be used for work, not chasing wild hair computer problems.

So I bought a Netis WF2118 Wireless N 300Mbps PCI Adapter. The manufacturer labels it as "compatible" with Windows 10. I paid twenty-some dollars for it.

The Netis card was installed a couple of weeks ago and has worked flawlessly since then, connecting to wifi immediately at start up.

My thanks to the several of you who offered ideas and advice.

Steve



#1
April 11, 2019 at 20:50:12
First the easy things: Restart your computer and Wifi router to see if that helps.
It is possible that Windows update updated your driver and it needs to be redone properly.
If the computer came set up as Wfi then you go to the system manufacture web site and go to Support>Downloads>Drivers and download and install first the Chipset Driver and then the NIC and Wifi drivers. Restart and see if that helps. If the Wifi card was an add on card then go to the card manufacture site and get the driver there.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
April 11, 2019 at 23:56:52

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#3
April 16, 2019 at 17:12:20
Fingers: I turn off my computer at the end of every work day. And frequently remove power from the wireless router. So both devices have been restarted many times since the problem began. A local computer shop built the computer for me, so no system manufacturer web site to go to. I'll look into the drivers but I am not a computer guru and tinkering with drivers is not my fav thing to do :(

Johnw: Tried the Troubleshooter, no joy.

Thank you both for your suggestions.

Steve


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Related Solutions

#4
April 21, 2019 at 10:07:14
Installing drivers is not difficult. You should download them from the manufacturer's site if possible to avoid downloading unwanted garbage and being assured you get the correct drivers. Download Belarc Advisor from the link below to learn everything you need to know about your computer.

Is your WiFi router part of your cable provider's hardware? Have you relocated the router or the computer? Most motherboards do NOT have WiFi integrated into the board, but yours may. Otherwise you may have an add in card for WiFi.

https://www.belarc.com/products_bel...

message edited by OtheHill


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#5
April 21, 2019 at 16:28:16
Upload SS ( screenshots ) of what Snail finds. Don't install any new drivers, just let us see what Snail finds.

Snail Driver
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/Snail-...
http://www.freewarefiles.com/screen...
http://snailsuite.com/

Upload to directupload.net ( http://en.directupload.net/ ). No account needed. Give us the link/links please.


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#6
April 21, 2019 at 18:29:50
Before I go down the belarc or snail driver path, here is some additional info. Prompted by a question asked by OtheHill, I opened up the desktop computer to get some further info.

The wifi card in my Windows 10 desktop computer is a TP-Link TL-WN851ND Version 1.0. The quick installation guide (downloaded from the TP-Link web site) indicates the system requirement for this wifi card is Windows XP, Windows Vista or Windows 7. Windows 10 is not in the list. TP-Link tech support advised me that the TL-WN851ND is not compatible with Windows 10 and declined to offer advice about my most-of-the-time wifi connect delay.

Although it is not compatible with Windows 10, the TL-WN851ND worked properly in my Windows 10 computer for about two years before the wifi connect delay issue began. Is that lack of compatibility something to be concerned about?

Steve


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#7
April 22, 2019 at 06:01:58
If the TP-Link web site has a driver for Windows 10 then is should work. If they were running a Windows 7 or 8 driver it may have worked but then after a Windows update security update the older driver may stop working due to the update.
On a side note, I had TP-Link Wifi router and other hardware but eventually had issues with them. More recently, I purchased a USB plug in Wifi dongle for my father-in-law that was TP-Link that never worked. I eventually went with an add in card from another brand. There is a possibility that the TP-Link Wifi card has gone bad so if reinstalling the driver from their site does not fix it you may need a new Wifi card. This is not a big job but if you are not comfortable doing it you may need to visit the shop for the repair. You can Google replacing a Wifi card and probably see many videos on the process to see if you feel you can do it.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
April 22, 2019 at 10:05:32
The TP-Link web site has this line regarding the driver for the TL-WN851ND PCI Adapter: Operating System: WinXP/Vista/7. That is in concert with the advice from their tech support a few days ago.

Given that the PCI Adapter is not compatible with the operating system, is it worth investigating with belarc or snail driver? Or should I replace the adapter with one the is Windows 10 compatible?

Keep in mind that the card works . . . the problem is that most of the time it takes 53 seconds at startup to connect to wifi.Once in a while it will connect immediately at startup.

Steve


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#9
April 22, 2019 at 14:04:45
You could try removing the device and rebooting. Windows may find the best driver for the card. Worst that can happen is that you replace it. Windows 7 drivers should work, but as I stated above Windows may find a driver that works.

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#10
April 22, 2019 at 16:13:00
"is it worth investigating with belarc or snail driver?"
They both free, so it becomes money verses free.
If time is no problem, leave no stone unturned, process of elimination.

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#11
April 23, 2019 at 05:59:02
Belarc advisor is a great tool to have in your toolbox.

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#12
May 21, 2019 at 12:49:16
✔ Best Answer
It turned out this way: I gave up on trying to troubleshoot the TP-Link TL-WN851ND wifi card. A work computer needs to be used for work, not chasing wild hair computer problems.

So I bought a Netis WF2118 Wireless N 300Mbps PCI Adapter. The manufacturer labels it as "compatible" with Windows 10. I paid twenty-some dollars for it.

The Netis card was installed a couple of weeks ago and has worked flawlessly since then, connecting to wifi immediately at start up.

My thanks to the several of you who offered ideas and advice.

Steve


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#13
May 22, 2019 at 22:23:22
#7: ".... There is a possibility that the TP-Link Wifi card has gone bad so if reinstalling the driver from their site does not fix it you may need a new Wifi card....."

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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