Solved Dual Boot Win 7 and Win 10

Asus / Rampage iv extreme x79
November 15, 2018 at 00:24:07
Specs: Windows 10 64 bit, 3.601 GHz / 16324 MB
Hi,

All my years working with computers, I have never had a need to install two or more operating systems on a machine.

My brother has asked me to do the following for him:-

1) Partition a 1TB drive in two three
2) Install Windows 7 on one
3) Install Windows 7 on the second
4) Install Windows 10 on the third

He also wished to use an application called Booit Bare Metal in order to be able to select the partition he wishes to boot in to.

This is how I am thinking of tackling this task, please correct/advise me where I may be wrong.

1) Install Windows 7 first
2) During the installation, when it displays the partitions, delete all partitions so that I have only 1 circa 1TB.
3) Split this into three separate partitions roughly 300GB each
4) Install Windows 7 on one of them
5) Once complete, start another installation this time installing Windows 7 on one of the other partitions
6) Start Windows 10 installation and install that on the first and final partition.

Does this sound correct?

Also, anyone used Bootit baremetal before?

Many thanks for any help or advice.

Thank you


See More: Dual Boot Win 7 and Win 10

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#1
November 15, 2018 at 08:04:24
First of all, the question comes to mind, WHY? Especially 2 copies of Windows 7. That said, is the computer suitable to run both Windows 7 & 10? If so, why buy a boot manager when there are many good free ones available? Just saying?

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#2
November 15, 2018 at 08:17:15
Hi OtheHill

I honestly dont know why he wants two versions of windows, it just what he wants me to do for him. Have you any experience or recommendations for boot managers?

Thanks again


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#3
November 15, 2018 at 10:28:25
✔ Best Answer
There are innumerable how to set it up guides out there on the www; some starting from scratch - win-7 in first and then adding win-10; some wind-10 and then want to add in win-7

This link will take you many of them:

http://tinyurl.com/y9lhwyqh

Presuming you start with win-7 in first; that will likely go in as windows. When you install a second version that will go in as winnt. It will be added to the boot menu of the original win-7 (presuming that win-7 behaves as did XP in that regard). If the first version went in a winnt, then the second will likely go in as windows.

Whenever i had two versions of an NT based OS I edited the boot menu ARC statement to reflect which was which - regardless of the names of the two installation as above. Makes it easier to know which is which?

Once they are both up and running simply follow the various how to install win-10 to complete the dual boot.

Not having done a dual with win-7 and 10 I can't speak further in that regard. I'm happy with win-7 and will avoid win-10 as long as I can. The more I read of win-10 the less I want anything to do with it. I've moved primarily to Mac OS and find it much preferable once I got used to its ways of doing things. Athough I do have both win-7 (dual boot on my Mac Mini) and also XP on a MacBook; and a 2005 Acer Aspire with XP-Pro still running OK; although it never/seldom goes on line...

message edited by trvlr


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#4
November 18, 2018 at 13:01:33
You could also just install Windows 7 and then create two virtual machines. Oracle Virtual Box will allow you to do that, and it's free. Assuming of course that you have the licenses and install media for both OSs.

Doing the best I can here... And remember, there's always more than one path to success. :)


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#5
November 18, 2018 at 13:09:52
Hi everyone,

So i downloaded and read through the guides for Bootit Bare Metal. I watched a lot of their videos and eventually figured out what to do.

My brother instisted on using bootit BM as its the boot manager he has always used and was comfortable with it, additionally he had a spare license for it.

The software is pretty straightforward, you create your partitions each one needing its own boot partition. You then create your boot order, assigning each windows partition to a boot partition and given that group a name.

Once that is done, you select each windows partition, initiate a windows install, then installing windows on it through the normal method usb or dvd.

To be honest iv spent so many hours with this software iver the weekend iv come to like it, a lot.

Its my firs lt time doing a dual boot, its my first time using bootit BM, iv had to learn a lot but it was worth it.

Thank you all for your suggestions and help i actually really appreciate it!


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#6
November 18, 2018 at 14:05:30
Boot mangers (various “makes”) were quite common way back. They allowed a novice a relatively simple way to have more than one operating system available. To be fair, even today they can and do have their place; be it for the more experienced ITtype or otherwise.

I used/tried two or three in the days of windows-3 through to win-95/98 and including NT4x. One can create dual or more boot systems without them; but it does require a little more effort (sometimes) and degree of understanding of how they work - based on the operating systems involved.


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#7
November 18, 2018 at 20:17:50
Through Windows 7 at least, if you install the older operating system first then the later one, the boot manager in Windows will detect the other versions of Windows and set up the multi-boot for you. I assume it is similar with Windows 10 but I have not done it. The only dual boot I set up a while back was Windows ME (a bad one) with Linux and Linux installed GRUB which is still one of their boot loaders which can also handle Windows.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
November 19, 2018 at 00:52:21
To be honest, you are probably right, if I had installed Windows 10 last it may have worked out better, I did start out that way but messed up a few times and had to start over, then once I got the swing of things, I picked up which ever USB was closets and installed it, and that was Windows 10. In any case it worked great. I may mess around with this again when i have time and see how it works with installing 7 first, but for now, im giving this machine back to my brother before i screw things up.

Are you guys running Windows 10 at all? i see a lot of posts where the regulars here are still running win 7 or XP and don't have many nice things to say about 10....

Have a good day guys!


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#9
November 19, 2018 at 06:22:27
Well, Win10 is the OS with advertising space built in. Advertising space that Microsoft was intending to sell to third parties. But to answer your question, yes, I run Win10, just not as my main OS.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#10
November 19, 2018 at 06:57:17
There appears to be an endless run of screwups from M$- land each time win-10 has an update. Consequently many, observing these constant and seemingly never ending events, choose to stay with the last two M$ offerings which (once some initial) issues had been resolved were considered reliable to use - win-7 and XP. Also neither generally didn’t require or one spend lots of money to update a given computer (even buy a new one) and assorted peripherals

Hardly surprising many avoid win-10 as a result of its demands and ongoing issues?


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#11
November 19, 2018 at 07:00:58
I have been running Windows 10 for well over a year. I built a new system at that time and then discovered that Windows 7 doesn't support AMD Rysen CPUs. There is a work around to install 7 but you can't get updates. So I am running 10. I have a third party program running the start menu but it still is a step backward, in my opinion. I think it is because Windows 10 supports touch screens so the menus are designed for them. The end result when using a PC is a more cumbersome experience, again, in my opinion.

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#12
November 19, 2018 at 07:07:18
Iv been running 10 almost since it was available, thankfully iv not had any issues with it, apart from some of my legacy softwares mot working, such as Visual Studios 6, yes its old.

I really like 10, not had any issues with it to be honest, iv managed to turn off all tye spyware and cortana. Looking back at win 7 i much prefer 10, thats just my preference. Its good to hear others experience and views.


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#13
November 19, 2018 at 19:57:20
I use and support a number of Windows 10 machines at work and there are two Windows 10 machines in the house but I personally prefer Windows 7 for as long as I can. My system is fairly modern but nothing really after it Intel wise is supported, so My next build will have to be Windows 10. I even managed to get Windows 7 to run off a PCIe SSD drive with a little bit of research and some work.
I had one of those Windows 10 glitches on my work computer recently where an update caused an 'Activate Windows' shadow to show on screen for a while. The fix for it was to wait nearly a week, force a manual update, and then do a Windows Activation Troubleshoot, which combined fixed that issue.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
November 20, 2018 at 00:50:30
I hint one of the problem with win-10 is that M$ is trying to make one OS to serve, run on both computers and phones/tablets; which latter are primarily touch screen devices and used in a manner different to a computer.

Apple has two separate types of OS, one for their computers and one for tablets/phones. I think they chose the better path., even allowing that they are now apparently considering changing that stance.

https://qz.com/1240908/when-will-th...

Personally I think the two systems, touch and non touch OS devices, is the best option. Certainly until the possible merging of the two OS is pretty well guaranteed to be much better and less problematic than the current M$ mess.


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