Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device

May 13, 2020 at 11:09:54
Specs: Windows 10, lots
I'm getting the following message:

"Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device?"

The possible answers are: "No".
And that's it.

I can't upload any image here, but to set the context: this message is from the UAC (User Account Control). And it is shown by, well, any function that needs elevated rights.

It's normal that such a message is shown. But the answers, or, answer, is abnormal.

It "states" this: "To continue, enter an admin user name and password."
Thing is, there is nothing to click on, there are no fields to fill in.

I know the password, but .. that doesn't help if you can't use it.

So, how did I get this far ? That is quite simple:
1. Enable your Administrator account, set a password on it.
2. Downgrade your normal account to a non-Administrator account. ( As you know, Windows creates Administrator accounts on installation. )
3. Disable the Administrator user account. Note : this is disabling the account from logging in. It is not: removing the account.

I was actually curious what would happen, either:
- I would be asked a password, just exactly as I did when my Administrator account was still enabled.
- I would just get the regular UAC window in which you can press OK if you agree, Cancel if not.

But now, that doesn't work.

message edited by Tangoscar44


See More: Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
May 13, 2020 at 13:32:15
Just guessing here, but you probably need to activate the admin account to use the credentials.
Can you activate the admin account again, or do you need admin privs to do that?

Reply ↓  Report •

#2
May 13, 2020 at 20:55:18
Try this:
https://superuser.com/questions/954...
....to create an admin account if you do not have one now.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
May 15, 2020 at 10:40:45
> Just guessing here, but you probably need to activate the admin account to
> use the credentials.
> Can you activate the admin account again, or do you need admin privs to
> do that?

Uhuh, logically .. .you need admin accounts, to enable the admin account.


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 15, 2020 at 10:49:24
> Try this:
> https://superuser.com/questions/954...
> ....to create an admin account if you do not have one now.

Need to be admin, to be able to create any user, not even an admin user.

The system is working, but the question more likely is: why is he not allowing me to get out of this loop.


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
May 15, 2020 at 10:56:48
There's no way I can be the only one with this issue, and it's pretty nasty in fact.

Here's one hit from Mircosoft itself:
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...

It *MAY* work if you disable UAC to the lowest level, but I am not going to do that.

I *THINK* the issue is that I actually have an Admin account with a password, and being disabled at the same time. There's no way you can have the same if you just enable, and then disable the admin account (without adding a password to the account).

Note: my regular account ... well, logically, I had that be removed from the Admin group !

Still, I think my Admin should be disabled, and I also think it should have a password. There's no logic at all in stating it is better, if you remove the password, which seems like the only "solution"

message edited by Tangoscar44


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
May 15, 2020 at 11:27:05
https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials...

So the issue is this:

IF you have zero - ACTIVE - Admin accounts on your machine, the UAC system totally fails, and you cannot run anything because the system looks for the admin account (an active one), doesn't find it, and then decides to do some weird things, like showing a window with no options.
Somebody programmed this this way, not sure what he/she must be smoking.

The failure is obviously that the User Management system, should not allow situations that don't work. But they do ...

So, you can re-install Windows (that solves many things), but you can also shift-Restart your PC, choose Advanced Options, Command Prompt,
- Which asks for the Administrator password, even if that account is actually disabled for normal use -
and then you can either change your non-admin user to be part of the Administrators group,
or create a new account which is part of the Administrators group.
It needs to be done with command line, the GUI tools dont work there.

I tried enabling my "administrators" account, and the tool stated succes, but when you login again, there's only your non-admin account shown.

message edited by Tangoscar44


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
May 15, 2020 at 14:50:29
The Recovery mode doesn't really cut it; you're entering some kind of admin mode, but you can not really manage users there. The regular used isn't visible, and if you echo %USERNAME% he says you are "SYSTEM".
I guess you can do stuff there (in the CMD command line that is), but not fixing users and groups.

But you can in the good old Safe mode. He let me login as Administrator (although this one should be disabled), and then I can do whatever.


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
May 17, 2020 at 09:19:33
So, this forces for "an admin" user to be enabled AT ALL TIMES
Normally, this is your one and only user you work with, but if you decide to improve Windows' security, you are confronted with the fact that "disabled" accounts suddenly really cannot be used for elevated rights, while the account is valid on itself, it's just disabled to login.

It begs the question why a user should be disabled in the first place. Normally, this is for permanent disabling an account, but this is not the case here, since people use it to do some "ultra high elevated rights needed" kind of operation, like one I did in another context.

A normal user with Admin rights < the Administrator user, with Admin rights

It's not the same, that's why the Administrator user gets enabled. But, it's dangerous as this user can do a lot. Really a lot.
That, combined with the fact you are not mandatory to set a password on it, while enabling, blows my mind.

Image Linux allowing to setup the ROOT user without a password, that would be ... wrong.

message edited by Tangoscar44


Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question