Can't boot in normal mode

February 25, 2017 at 21:06:16
Specs: Windows 10
My computer shut down suddenly, then restarted. Then shut down and then restarted. After two times, it will load the recovery page. From there, I can get to safe mode. I tried pretty much everything, and nothing works. I tried a restore and it failed. I tried a reset and that failed. I did a chkdsk and found several errors in index $I30. Will a check and repair work on this or are some files corrupted to the point that the drive is useless? I seem to remember a similar problem I had with Windows 7, but I can't remember how of if I could fix them. Any ideas?

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#1
February 26, 2017 at 02:53:40
Failed or faulty hardware (eg hard drive) would prevent Safe Mode from running as well, so it can't be a hardware issue.

A bad third-party driver or some bad third-party software is usually the cause when Normal Mode won't run but Safe Mode is unaffected.

Try to remember what was the last driver or software you installed just before the problem first occurred, then uninstall it in Safe Mode.

message edited by phil22


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#2
February 26, 2017 at 07:46:55
Also... this very handy and safe to use utility may help...

It's often recommended here; and does fix more than a few problems.

Ideally it is run in safe-mode... Let it do a full run and let it do every step... It will bck up the registry as part of its initial process.

http://www.tweaking.com

The download is within the text areas - below those very obvious green download buttons at the top of the screen. They are NOT the utility and should be avoided.


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#3
February 26, 2017 at 08:35:17
Thank you! I'll try those ideas.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 26, 2017 at 08:47:10
Incidentally, when all is well, ensure you make copies of "all" important personal files (typically photos, music etc.) to external storage. Typically to DVD (make two sets, label and store safely); and also to an external hard drive too is nice(r).

This will ensure that should the system fail completely at any time the bulk of those precious personal files will be safe elsewhere.

Check the copies at intervals and renew/update too regularly. Check the copies after you have made them the first time (and subsequently too) to - to ensure they are truly accessible...

Make it a habit to copy your files off the system entirely at all times; even if they also remain on the hard drive too.

As you can boot into safe-mode at present, there is no reason you can't do that now...


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#5
February 26, 2017 at 11:28:40
Well, that utility didn't work. It completed, said I had to restart, so I did - same problem. The computer restarted twice before finally booting into safe mode. I had run chkdsk and it found some errors in $I30 index. Ran chkdsk/repair overnight - didn't fix the problem either. I was hoping that utility would work.

Fortunately, I did already save all my important files. I also have an external HD, but...I do need the computer. I'm quite puzzled. I also did a full virus scan. Nothing.

Any other suggestions? I'm getting desperate. Could it be a problem with the boot file or whatever it is? Is there a way to fix that? I think I did that once long ago on a different computer, but it wasn't using Windows 10.

Oh...I don't remember the last time I installed a new program. It's been a while. So I don't think that would be the problem.

message edited by Kaityf


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#6
February 26, 2017 at 13:10:41
In the past I have resolved damaged installations ('9x, XP, win-7) by doing what is referred to as a repair installation. In effect one installs the OS over itself. In XP, win-7 one does NOT use the standard windows Repair option.

Not yet familiar with win-10 so I had to do a little research - not difficut; Google produced this:

http://tinyurl.com/z9fnvvo

which is M$'s method for "repairing" a damaged win-10 installation. In effect an overwrite installation of the current installation - and saves (so they say...) all your files and settings etc... I'd still ensure anything valuable is safe off the system anyway...

And this the list of hits (how to...) I found via google including the one above:

http://tinyurl.com/hj7u6hn


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#7
February 26, 2017 at 14:33:02
Thank you! I'll try that.

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#8
February 26, 2017 at 15:50:28
Okay, this is crazy. I downloaded some tool from Microsoft to create an ISO to burn on a USB drive. I think that worked okay, but when I select the USB as the HD to boot from, the computer uses its own hard drive to boot from and I'm back to square one.

message edited by Kaityf


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#9
February 26, 2017 at 21:17:30
I cannot do anything. I managed to get an ISO and using Rufus, created a boot disk with all the necessary files. However, nothing I do will get that computer to boot with the flash drive. I formatted the flash drive as NTSF, but maybe I should have formatted it as FAT32? Could there be something wrong with the USB ports? I did go into BIOS and changed the boot order to start with a USB HDD. But it doesn't matter. And I do use the USB ports in the back of the computer.

What's the likelihood of being able to boot from a DVD instead of a flash drive?


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#10
February 26, 2017 at 21:20:48
Many systems show a brief 'hit any key to boot from...' when not the hard drive so you can try that when restarting to it.

You also may have a problem with either your hard drive or your RAM.
Run Memtest86 via bootable CD or Flash Drive to test memory.
Run Seatools by Seagate via bootable CD or Flash Drive to test hard drive (short test).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
February 26, 2017 at 21:37:48
Gawdddddd. It doesn't matter. I have the wrong dang ISO!!! This is SO frustrating!!!!

I went through the process of creating the bootable disk but this time I formatted the flash drive as FAT32 and it worked. BUT it's the wrong dang ISO. It's for an upgrade. I need an ISO for Windows 10. I have Windows 10 installed. I have my key code for it. I just need a way to install the darn thing.

I have been at this for two full days, practically nonstop.

Hold the phone...this might be working. I think I clicked on the wrong thing before.

message edited by Kaityf


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#12
February 26, 2017 at 22:28:54
Thanks for the help. I got Windows installed fresh and computer is working now!

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#13
February 26, 2017 at 23:01:46
Well...I guess I spoke too soon. I did get Windows installed, but the computer keeps restarting every two minutes. The resolution is also way too big. I changed it, and then the computer said it was looking for a driver. Then restarted again. I changed the resolution back. Computer restarted again. It's about every two minutes.

This was with the flash drive still in the computer. I changed the BIOS again to boot from the hard drive. When it restarted, I ended up right back in the endless loop that started me on this quest to begin with.

Now I'm wondering something... When I installed Windows again, I installed it in a partition that was not reserved. I think that might have been a mistake. One of the reserved partitions said "System." I'm thinking I should have installed it over that one. Is the computer having an issue because there are two Windows installs on it? Is it reverting back to starting up with the messed up Windows that is in the System partition?

What do I do now?


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#14
February 27, 2017 at 13:47:46
If you want a clean install then you need to use the install disk to delete all partitions first to wipe out all of the old. Then let it create any and all partitions it requires by itself.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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