Can Windows Logging be turned off?

December 2, 2018 at 07:28:19
Specs: several
I've been using Windows 10 on this laptop for two years,
and as far as I recall, I've never made actual use of the
event logs. I have re-installed Windows a couple of times,
disabled some log files and deleted others, so the number
of log files on my computer is probably far less than would
be expected for a computer two years old.

In Event Viewer/Windows Logs I find:

Application....4,280 events
Security......30,740 events
Setup.................5 events
System.......29,047 events

In Applications and Services Logs:

Hewlett-Packard......1 event
isaAgentLog..........98 events
Microsoft/Windows.... roughly 130,000 events in 100 logs!

Do I need ANY of these?
Can they all be turned off? If so, how?
Can existing logs all be deleted? If so, how?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

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#1
December 2, 2018 at 09:48:43
You might be better off to use a batch file to clear all logs from time to time. See here:
https://winaero.com/blog/how-to-cle...

Then if you need to look at Events when diagnosing a problem they will be more manageable (see the most recent ones only). I have found the information useful at times for diagnosis but "Event error chasing" in its own right is probably pointless because most of them don't matter a fig.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#2
December 4, 2018 at 00:36:31
I'm sure that you can simply disable the Windows logging service.

I'm even more sure that you shouldn't.


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#3
December 4, 2018 at 20:39:33
Tell me about why I shouldn't.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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Related Solutions

#4
December 4, 2018 at 23:14:17
Better question: What do you hope to gain from disabling logging?

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#5
December 5, 2018 at 00:02:29
1. It has no performance impact.

2. It uses minimal disk space.

3. Certain other services require Windows logging to be running.

4. Turning it off deprives you of useful information and is a potential security risk. It might lead to system crashes.

I'm sure that you have a good reason for wanting to disable this required Windows service - I'd be intrigued to know what it is.


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#6
December 5, 2018 at 13:44:00
I'm not concerned about performance or disk space.

I AM concerned that the drive is CONSTANTLY being written
to, without my informed consent. I have almost no idea what
is being recorded, or why. As I said, in the two years I've been
using this computer, I'm pretty sure I've never gotten any useful
information from any log. It clearly is not being recorded for MY
benefit.

What certain other services require Windows logging to be running?
I've tried disabling PreFetch, Superfetch, ReadyBoot, Disk Optimizer,
and various other things, but the drive is still CONSTANTLY being
written to.

How is turning off logging a security risk? Is it as big a risk as
allowing unknown programs to write unknown information to
unknown locations on my hard drive for unknown purposes
without informing me that they are doing so?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#7
December 5, 2018 at 14:30:03
You can stop the Event logging if you want to by switching it off in Services:

Type services.msc in the Run box (Windows key + R).

Locate "Windows Event Log" in the list on the right.
Double click it and hit the Stop button.
After it has stopped use the drop down in "Startup type" and set it to Disable.

The logs will remain but will no longer be added to. If you want to clear them out use the batch file I suggested in #1.

As said, I have found the logs useful for diagnosis at different times over the years.
They are not particularly sinister, only MS collecting error data for analysis.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#8
December 6, 2018 at 11:05:00
If you believe that Windows is an unknown program writing unknown information to your hard disk, then you are probably using the wrong operating system.

Personally, I don't like my OS doing things without letting me see what it is doing. That's what the event logs are for - to keep a record of what is happening to your system. And, God forbid, somebody manages to break into your system the information they provide would be invaluable. More prosaically, they will let you track and deal with andy problems that your system is encountering.

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