Blue Screen -- Windows 10

Microsoft Windows 7 professional with sp...
November 3, 2017 at 15:25:53
Specs: Windows 10, n/a
My computer has been blue screening at times and I have not made any changes to the system configuration. What can I do to find what is causing the problem?

See More: Blue Screen -- Windows 10

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#1
November 3, 2017 at 19:51:14
Well, if you have anything in your C:\Windows\Minidump, you can post it online somewhere, and I can throw it into the debugger. It'll at least give you some information, which is more than what Win10 does these days.

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#2
November 5, 2017 at 18:24:30
How can I get the minidump to you? I had the online dump analyzer look at it and it looks like bad memory.

http://www.osronline.com/page.cfm?n...

Here is part of the output of that memory dump:

Crash Dump Analysis provided by OSR Open Systems Resources, Inc. (http://www.osr.com)
Online Crash Dump Analysis Service
See http://www.osronline.com for more information
Windows 8 Kernel Version 14393 MP (8 procs) Free x64
Product: WinNt, suite: TerminalServer SingleUserTS Personal
Built by: 14393.1715.amd64fre.rs1_release_inmarket.170906-1810
Machine Name:
Kernel base = 0xfffff803`4fa85000 PsLoadedModuleList = 0xfffff803`4fd83040
Debug session time: Sun Oct 8 21:33:58.046 2017 (UTC - 5:00)
System Uptime: 13 days 15:41:47.891
*******************************************************************************
* *
* Bugcheck Analysis *
* *
*******************************************************************************

MEMORY_MANAGEMENT (1a)
# Any other values for parameter 1 must be individually examined.
Arguments:
Arg1: 0000000000041792, The subtype of the bugcheck.
Arg2: ffffa93eff90a110
Arg3: 80001b0300000000
Arg4: 0000000000000000

Does this show that a RAM memory module is bad?


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#3
November 6, 2017 at 08:01:27
That's okay, I'm not going to get anything out of a minidump that the analyzer hadn't. In fact, that output looks suspiciously like windbg.

For reference, Arg1 -> Corrupted PTE. Arg2 -> Address of corrupt PTE. Arg3/4 -> Value of corrupt PTE.

So, there's three things it can be:
1) Bad hardware, presumably memory
2) Corrupted Windows install
3) Something running amok

Unless you've recently had a malware infection or recently installed drivers, we can probably ignore 3 for now. First step would be to check for bad RAM. Easiest way to go about that would be to right-click the start button, and Run -> mdsched -> Restart now and check for problems. That won't run the best memory test out there, but it'll run the one that comes with Win10. If there are any errors, you have bad memory.

EDIT: Oh, wow, that site doesn't even try to hide it's running windbg behind the scenes. "Immediate !Analyze -v: OSR's Instant Online Crash Analysis"

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message edited by Razor2.3


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Related Solutions

#4
November 7, 2017 at 04:47:08
There were no errors after reported after the reboot.
My son's computer is also at times crashing (BlueScreen)

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#5
November 7, 2017 at 06:20:45
Is this a case of it also blue screens, or is it a case of it blue screens at approximately the same time? And are these laptops, or desktops? If we're talking roughly the same time and they're desktops, you're probably looking at bad power. Fixing that takes professional electricians, so it would get expensive fast. You could work around it with mid- to upper- tier personal UPS systems for each PC, but laptops already have their own batteries.

So Microsoft's test didn't find bad memory, but that doesn't mean the memory isn't bad, just not bad enough to get caught. Next easiest thing to do would be to check for corrupted Windows. To do that, you'll need an elevated command prompt, so right click on the start button and pick either Command Prompt (Admin) or Windows PowerShell (Admin), the difference won't matter with what we're doing. Once it's up, run:

dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth
sfc /scannow
If SFC finds any corruption, reboot.

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message edited by Razor2.3


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#6
November 8, 2017 at 03:58:15
They are both desktops. I don't think they BSOD at the same time. I have both PC's plugged into a surge protection unit. One PC is plugged into a low end APC surge protector which does have a small battery, the other PC is plugged into a mid-tier APC PSU.
I will check to see if the Windows OS is corrupted.
Thanks!!!

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#7
November 9, 2017 at 15:38:49
Well, if you notice your PCs are going bad within the first two years, I'd suggest getting a line conditioner. UPSes used to provide line conditioning as a matter of course, but there are dedicated units to do it if your UPS doesn't, or doesn't do it well enough.

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#8
November 9, 2017 at 15:44:03
how can the power make cause a PC to BlueScreen. If there was a problem with the power, the PC would reboot. And I see no problems with any other the other devices I use that are plugged in to the power.

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#9
November 16, 2017 at 11:45:21
If you're asking for a generalized component failure analysis, it's beyond my pay grade. I can tell you current transistors are so small, there's 14 million of them in a squared millimeter. Small enough that the placement of individual atoms can cause faults.

If you're asking why desktop PCs are so electronically vulnerable, that's a bit easier to explain. PCs are over 40 years old, and most of that time has been focused on making them cheaper. You don't cut costs without cutting a few corners. After 40 years of cutting, everything that isn't in the advertising blob is cut down to the bare minimum. This includes voltage and current regulation, and the situation isn't helped with the requirement to use surge suppressors to help control excessive voltage. Laptops have it better. Since they need to operate from both the power grid and its own batteries, laptops need to be able to regulate their own voltage. This allows them to better handle the typical peaks and valleys of the power grid.

Speaking of surge suppressors, they loose their ability to suppress surges with age. 1-2 years for clean power sources, less for dirty power grids.

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