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Solved Another question Re erasing C:Drive

Microsoft / Windows latest edition up...
January 22, 2021 at 14:11:53
Specs: windows 10, intel i5
Hello all, once i transfer all of the files i want to my new computer, can i use the facility in CCleaner to erase my hard drive??? It gives an option to wipe the drive and with multiple passes.

Is this thorough enough??

Thanks, Gep


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✔ Best Answer
January 23, 2021 at 08:50:06
Unless you have plans to sell the drive, best thing is to just hang on to it and put it in a USB case and use it for an external drive.

Otherwise, if you're concerned about someone stealing your private data, destroying it is the best option.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."



#1
January 22, 2021 at 15:00:54
Best way gep, use a Windows install disk/thumb drive & during the install Delete all the partitions. Keep hitting Delete until Delete & Format are greyed out. You are then left with an Unallocated drive.
At this point, you can exit the install.

message edited by Johnw


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#2
January 22, 2021 at 15:08:26
Hello John, where do I get one of those?? Thanks, Gep

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#3
January 22, 2021 at 15:29:32
Are you saying you want to wipe the drive in your old computer - after you've safely transferred all data from it to wherever; and "know" that the copies in the new location are actually fully accessible and intact?

Almost "any" windows installation CD will allow that drive erase? CCleaner is a pest and junk file removal tool; it doesn't wipe a drive.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 22, 2021 at 16:32:26
There is a tool in CCleaner called "Drive Wiper" that lets
you "Securely erase the contents or free space on a drive".
I've never used it, but I have no reason to think that it
doesn't do what the name suggests.

On the other hand, just removing the partition information
doesn't make the data on a drive unrecoverable.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
January 22, 2021 at 16:42:50
Wiping is for the paranoid, it takes many, many hours.

How to Recover Data from Hard Disk After Disk Wipe?
https://recoverit.wondershare.com/h...


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#6
January 22, 2021 at 23:56:36
Thanks all for you replies, Gep

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#7
January 23, 2021 at 03:35:42
I use DBAN to wipe disks.

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#8
January 23, 2021 at 05:04:05
I hung around a computer recycling place a little bit a few
years ago. When they received a computer for recycling,
they gave the donor the option of either wiping the drive
so that it could be re-used, which they said would take two
hours, or pound a cold chisel through it, which I saw done.
Either way, it was done while the donor was in the shop.

That was at Free Geek Twin Cities.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
January 23, 2021 at 08:40:57
It's relatively simple to retrieve data from a drive that's been formatted or wiped. How concerned are you about your data? The only 100% sure way is what Jeff mentioned - physically destroy the platters in the HDD.

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#10
January 23, 2021 at 08:50:06
✔ Best Answer
Unless you have plans to sell the drive, best thing is to just hang on to it and put it in a USB case and use it for an external drive.

Otherwise, if you're concerned about someone stealing your private data, destroying it is the best option.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#11
January 23, 2021 at 09:13:48
Only secure way to prevent someone accessing an olde drive...

Smash as above with a hammer; then crush and grind/shred the parts; then burn the shredded parts in a very hot fire; then collect the ashes; then hire a hecilopter and fly out over an ocean. Once out beyond the national costal waters limits, hover a few feet above the waves and scatter the ashes... Job dun 'n dusted...

Return to base and have a cuppa char or kawfee...


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#12
January 23, 2021 at 12:37:29
I hope you scatter the ashes over a subduction zone so
they will be pulled down underneath the Earth's crust,
where the data should be safe for a few million years,
at least. Even if it does resurface in volcanic eruptions,
it will be pretty well scattered around the globe.

But a simple one-pass wipe seems adequate to me.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#13
January 23, 2021 at 12:47:05
Neva do tings by half... grasshopper

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