Who remembers what I searched for?

February 28, 2020 at 03:50:17
Specs: several
Windows 10 came installed on my 2016 HP laptop. It included
an app named "Maps", but I never used it, and it is essentially
disabled.

I use the Edge browser. If I recall correctly, the default home
page is the same as the page that opens when I open a new
window in Edge. It has a text input box below a line that says
"Where to next?" Over to the right is a little icon that has a
popup description of "Customization and account settings".
I presume it refers to a Microsoft account. I don't have one.

For the last couple of years I have almost exclusively used
DuckDuckGo to search the Internet. Not Google or Bing.

Just now I wanted to see maps of Japan beyond those that turned
up on the first page of hits from DuckDuckGo. I thought that
Microsoft and/or Google might have what I want. I used Google
Earth some years ago. Neither Google Earth nor Google Maps were
on the first page of hits from DuckDuckGo. So I decided to open
a new window and use the searchbox on that page.

I believe I just typed in "maps" and hit the Enter key.

What I got was a bunch of maps of Norway.

I used this search method to find maps of Norway last September.
Five months ago. Since then I have used CCleaner many times to
clear all cookies, temporary files, history, and even stuff like
prefetch data.

Where was my previous search stored that it re-appeared now?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


See More: Who remembers what I searched for?

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
February 28, 2020 at 07:29:23
What happens if you enter gas stations near me in your browser's address bar?

It might have something to do with where the browser thinks you are located or, more specifically, where your ISP is located.

I have three browsers on my work system.

Chrome

In Chrome, even though I am not logged in to my Chrome account and am currently at least 15 miles from my home, Google returns gas stations that are right around the corner from my house, even though there are gas stations that are much closer to where I am right now. Why Chrome chose my "home" location even when I am not logged in and not at home is a mystery to me.

Entering maps in Chrome's address bar simply returns a map of the world, centered on the US.

IE

In IE, the gas stations hits were from Manhattan, NYC (350 miles away) where our corporate offices are. My assumption is that Google is seeing the "external " IP address of our data center in NYC, not the internal IP address of my machine.

Unfortunately, we have a browser-based financial database app called "maps" so when I enter maps in the IE address bar, the database opens, not a map of any geographic area.

Edge

In Edge, Bing returns gas station results centered around Perth Amboy. NJ. Why? I don't know.

When I enter maps in my Edge address bar. I get that same NJ map. Why Edge/Bing thinks Perth Amboy, NJ is "near me" is beyond my comprehension.

There, I have been no help to you at all. You're welcome.

message edited by DerbyDad03


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
February 28, 2020 at 09:24:55
Who know who snoops and retains on where one goes these days... Certainly the big G doth and increasingly I suspect others do... And just where they hide that info???

Only "The Shadow" knows for sure...


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
February 28, 2020 at 09:51:43
Here's my results:

What happens if you enter gas stations near me in your Waterfox browser's address bar using DuckDuckGo?

The very first hit is a small map of the general area around my town,
with the red dots indicating gas stations.
Now the interesting part is that its from Apple Maps
and they have a blue button that requests
"Try enabling anonymous location for more accurate results."

Selecting the maps button on the browser just brings up a larger version of the Apple Map.

Seems DDG uses Apple Maps by default?

Using Google to do the search, I get a small google map with the red pointers to the gas stations.
Selecting the map button gives a larger Google map.

Using Bing was interesting, it gives a list of gas stations with the current price in a banner across the
top and the obligatory map is down a bit on the right side and it is a Bing map.


"I used this search method to find maps of Norway last September."

I know that Google keeps a history of all you do, could you have possibly used Google for
one of your Norway searches?

I know I switch between search engine all the time.
I use DDG for most of my stuff, but prefer Google Maps so will occasionally use Google
and very rarely use Bing.

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 28, 2020 at 10:34:44
FedoraFather,

Well, no help with the question I asked. Maybe some question
I didn't ask.

I have Location completly turned off in the computer. I use a
proprietary LGE/4G wireless modem/router to connect to the
Internet, so the info about that is visible. Websites tell me that
I am in various locations around the Twin Cities. A couple have
said I'm just two or three miles from my actual location, but none
has ever pinpointed the cell tower that I think I get my signal from,
which is less than two miles away, or done better.

I'm surprised to see that there is a phone number in the modem's
little LED screen when I have it show "About" info. It is a local
area code, for Minneapolis and a couple of close-in suburbs only.
An Internet phone number lookup site tells me the number is in a
suburb that is not close in, and is on the opposite side of town.
Maybe that is the location of the local office of the national telco
which is my ISP. I think I have seen that general part of town
identified as my location more than once. I suppose they have
the ability to make their area code anything they want, so they
made it the area code of Minneapolis rather than that of the
suburb they are in. It is explicitly a "mobile" number.

The maps of Norway that the default search engine (probably Bing,
although I didn't see any ID anywhere) returned were maps I saw
last fall. I expect that it was a new search, done this morning, but
sombody must have remembered exactly what I asked for five
months ago. And it seems unlikely to have been stored on my
computer. That means that not only was my search stored in a
remote location, but the information about who (which computer or
modem) did the search was stored along with the search string.

I sure would like to know who stored that info, and where.

It isn't obvious, but again, it looks like the search engine is Bing,
since I was unable to easily remove Bing from the list of search
engines Windows uses.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
February 28, 2020 at 10:45:37
mmcconaghy replied:

>> "I used this search method to find maps of Norway last September."
>
> I know that Google keeps a history of all you do, could you have
> possibly used Google for one of your Norway searches?

Yes, that is definitely possible, although I think I probably used the
default search box that comes up in a new Edge window, and that
seems very likely to be Bing. And it is the search box I used today.

So it is most likely Microsoft that saved my search along with either
my computer's ID or my modem/router's ID. I wonder what ID they
used, where they stored it, and how they retrieved it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
February 28, 2020 at 11:23:47
Based on your other posts, you seem to be concerned about privacy & security, so I'm surprised that you use Edge at all. Hopefully it's the new Chromium based version & not the older "legacy" version. Here's how to manage the security settings: https://www.techrepublic.com/articl...

As for the differing search results, that's to be expected. ISPs & locations are different plus we all manage our Windows settings differently. For example, if you go to Internet Options in Control Panel, do you have the box checked next to "Delete browsing history on exit"? If you click Settings & then the History tab, how many days do you allow pages to be stored? When you setup your Windows 10 user ID, did you provide an email address or did you setup an offline account instead? And since you seem to be using cellular internet, does anything sync up with your phone that may somehow affect the search results on your PC?


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
February 28, 2020 at 11:41:49
re: FedoraFather

In my case, Derby ≠ Fedora.

Derby = https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBi...


message edited by DerbyDad03


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
February 28, 2020 at 13:13:01
You mean that in your case, Derby ⊄ hat.

Your Derby may be even better than the fabulous Kirwood Derby!

riider,

I use Edge because it was the default, it works, and I mucked up
Windows so much that FireFox doesn't work anymore. I could
have tried to fix that, but instead I just kept using Edge.

What are the privacy or security concerns with Edge? I use the
version that was in Windows in mid-2016. It hasn't been updated.

I generally use CCleaner to delete cookies and history, rather than
or in addition to doing it in the browser. They have been deleted
numerous times since I did the Norway map search.

I have only a local account. I do use Gmail, but I gave them only
minimal info. I have never owned a cell phone, though I do have
an Android tablet computer. It only connects to my laptop via USB,
and I have used it very rarely in the last year or so since I got the
laptop fully set up.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#9
February 28, 2020 at 15:13:57

Reply ↓  Report •

#10
February 28, 2020 at 15:47:39
Looks like another example of M$ sekret snooping as of yore. I thought they had publicly stated they no-longer engage in such practices, following the early discoveries and disclosures that they had been at in early versions of win-10... Incidentally I have a recollection that were up to it even in win-95 and got caught out then?

And then there’s the big G who are blatantly tracking and more what one views, where one goes...


Reply ↓  Report •

#11
February 28, 2020 at 19:06:29
Websites can collect a variety of info from the browser (and the one who is browsing):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_t...

Even if you clean your PC with any tool after you used browsers, the information is already collected or stored in some hidden files on your PC.
Advertisers (and other institutions) go to great length to catch your browsing habits and interests.
Bitdefender has a anti-tracker extension for most browsers except for Edge. I guess some anti-tracker software may be available on the web... for free or premium.


Reply ↓  Report •

#12
February 28, 2020 at 20:22:46
John,

After going to the websites you linked and clicking on the
"Download" buttons to download Index.dat Suite Portable or
index.dat Viewer, I get the same error message from each.
Apparently a 404.

Probably something I did to Windows, but I have been able to
download other programs. Not necessarily from those sites.

Do people here generally agree that the information must have
been stored in my computer, not elsewhere as I have thought?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#13
February 28, 2020 at 21:24:10
"Apparently a 404"
They are dead Jeff.
The most important part of my post, is the name index.dat
Googling gives us another viewer.

Free Internet Window Washer
https://www.softpedia.com/get/Secur...
http://www.eusing.com/Window_Washer...
"You can use Free Internet Window Washer as a index.dat viewer. Select the "View History" to view the index.dat file"

message edited by Johnw


Reply ↓  Report •

#14
February 29, 2020 at 11:24:49
re: "You mean that in your case, Derby ⊄ hat."

No, I meant what I said: Derby ≠ Fedora

You performed a direct substitution, Fedora for Derby. That means that you equated Derby with Fedora, a specific element in the set of "hats".

In my case, Derby is not equated with Fedora, therefore Derby ≠ Fedora.

message edited by DerbyDad03


Reply ↓  Report •

#15
February 29, 2020 at 11:37:47
Johnw:

re: "The most important part of my post, is the name index.dat"

Jeff said he is using the Edge browser in Windows 10. I'm far from any type of Win 10 expert, but it is my understanding that these 2 things are true:

1 - Win 10 does not use the index.dat file
2 - index.dat was used with IE9 and earlier, never with IE10 or later and never with Edge

I don't IE, but I just opened IE11 and browsed a bit. I then used WW to view index.dat. It is empty.

See here:

http://blog.nirsoft.net/2012/12/08/...

message edited by DerbyDad03


Reply ↓  Report •

#16
February 29, 2020 at 15:40:10
DerbyDad03 replied to Jeff:

>> "You mean that in your case, Derby ⊄ hat."
> No, I meant what I said: Derby ≠ Fedora
>
> You performed a direct substitution, Fedora for Derby.
> That means that you equated Derby with Fedora, a specific
> element in the set of "hats".

I admit that I performed a direct substitution, but I don't think that
means I "equated" Derby with Fedora. I think instead that it was
artistic license. Call me licentious. If you do, it will probably be
the first time anybody ever has.

> In my case, Derby is not equated with Fedora, therefore
> Derby ≠ Fedora.

Both your premise and your conclusion are true, but the
argument misses the points. My points were that a Fedora is
like a Derby in that they are both hats, and that FedoraFather
has the same form, GENERAL meaning, and alliteration of
DerbyDad. Your point was that a Derby is a race, not a hat.

When you said that a Fedora is not a Derby, you were stating
a known true fact, but not the relevant fact that your name Derby
does not refer to a hat. That's what my reply says: In your case,
Derby ⊄ hat. That is what you meant.

However, it just occurred to me that the term "equated" seems
to be used by other people in a way that I never do. Maybe it
is how you are using the term. I always use the term rather
strictly, like $1 = 99¢. Others use it like "I equate Persia with
luxury" (I just found this example in a search, where the question
was how using the word "with" changes the meaning from using
the word "to", which seems to be what we are doing. Thank you
Douglas Hofstadter.)


On my computer, the folder specified in the NirSoft blog contains
seven files: Two from the day I installed Windows last August, one
from early this morning, when I last shut the computer off, and four
from when I turned it back on this afternoon. One of the latter is
WebCacheV01.dat, which is by far the largest at 58,880 kB.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#17
February 29, 2020 at 15:54:25
Nice work DerbyDad03.
I downloaded Free Internet Window Washer & ran on my W10 comp, nothing found.

Jeff has been using CCleaner, so I ran the Analyzer with index.dat unchecked & then checked.
No difference.
Be interesting to see if he gets the same result.
https://i.imgur.com/JyImgiq.gif
https://i.imgur.com/b45kqrj.gif


Reply ↓  Report •

#18
February 29, 2020 at 18:04:10
erm... "derby" is the term for a race; originally a horse race, but nowadays also applies to soapbox racers too?

In the UK there is the (original) Derby; and in the USA there is the Kentucky Derby - and of course the famous Soapbox Derby of DerbyDad03 fame...


Reply ↓  Report •

#19
February 29, 2020 at 20:33:27
Yes, a "derby" is a race or contest, not just a horse race

2nd definition here:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dic...

BTW...It's Soap Box Derby, not Soapbox Derby

How To Post Data or Code ---> Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code


Reply ↓  Report •

#20
February 29, 2020 at 23:00:19
I just noticed that the two unusual symbols I used above look
astonishingly similar: ⊄ and ¢.

Nevertheless, ⊄ ≠ ¢.

Does that make cents?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#21
March 1, 2020 at 00:50:16
I used BionicPup from DVD to rename the WebCacheV01.dat file.
When I restarted Windows and Edge, I found that both history
and cookies were cleared.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


Reply ↓  Report •

#22
March 1, 2020 at 02:35:34
Windows 10 - Microsoft Edge Browser Forensics
https://bsmuir.kinja.com/windows-10...
"Since IE10 browsing history records are no longer stored in Index.DAT files, but are instead stored in an Extensible Storage Engine (ESE) database format, and Microsft Edge is no different. In fact most of the Edge artefacts are stored in ESE databases"

Reply ↓  Report •

#23
Reply ↓  Report •

#24
March 1, 2020 at 06:54:13
re: However, it just occurred to me that the term "equated" seems to be used by other people in a way that I never do....I always use the term rather strictly, like $1 = 99¢.

In my world, a 1% difference would not be considered "rather strictly".

message edited by DerbyDad03


Reply ↓  Report •

#25
March 1, 2020 at 08:00:16
OMG! DID I TYPE THAT???

I did. It wasn't intentional. My brain must have gotten
loose again. "$1 = 99¢". Holy shnubblefivitz! Did I ever
foul that up good!

I wonder if I ever would have caught that eventually if
you hadn't brought it to my attention. Yow.

So, what do I owe you? Not a new fedora, I hope. Them
is expensive. Maybe ice cream. Will a nice sundae do?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#26
March 1, 2020 at 08:07:53
So, what do I owe you? Not a new fedora, I hope. Them
is expensive. Maybe ice cream. Will a nice sundae do?

I think it will have to be the latest top of the range hybrid/all electric powered Soap Box "vehicle"...


Reply ↓  Report •

#27
March 1, 2020 at 08:29:12
Thankfully, those are home-made, by the driver.

I *was* thinking I might have to supply a new set of
tires, though. I liked the ice cream sundae idea better.

That does have the drawback of requiring refrigeration.
Depending, of course, on where it is delivered to.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#28
March 1, 2020 at 18:39:54
re: "Thankfully, those are home-made, by the driver."

Blanket statements are often inaccurate.

The "Soap Box Derby" is not a singular entity. The All American Soap Box Derby (which is actually an international organization that holds a true World Championship race each year) is very different than the Red Bull Soapbox Derby (even in spelling) which is very different than a number of spin-off gravity racing programs that call themselves Soap Box Derby races.

The reason I bring this up is because different organizations have different rules as far as car construction. For example, the vast majority of the cars used in the AASBD races are home built but not home made. The cars are purchased as kits from the AASBD organization and built using only the parts that come in the kit and under a very strict set of guidelines. It's a long and winding road that got the AASBD to switch to a kit business model, but it was done to help keep the sport/organization alive.

The Red Bull race, on the other hand, is a much more free wheeling (no pun intended) race in which originality of design (read: wacky) and race day showmanship are the norm.

Other Soap Box Derby programs are run with cars that can cost 6 figures to build. I know a guy who owns a business that designs and manufactures the bob-sleds you see in the Olympics. When his daughter aged out of the AASBD, they moved on to the Ultimate Speed program and Dad built a "Soap Box Derby" car that - had he actually had to pay someone for - cost about $150K. To keep the car as aerodynamic as possible, the driver laid flat on her back and look up into a pair of prism glasses which allowed her to see forward through a tiny window in the nose of the car.

P.S. That car won a lot of races.

I was lucky. We raced during the transition period between home made and home built. When my son was 12, we had to buy the kit from the ASSBD, but we were allowed to make our own internal parts - steering mechanisms, axle mounts, etc. We were allowed to fiberglass the body to make it stiffer, reshape it to be more aerodynamic, etc. In the last year that modifications to the kit were allowed, my son won the World Championship race in Akron, OH in a photo finish - by .003 seconds.

message edited by DerbyDad03


Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question