What Should I Consider When Buying a Frying Pan?

March 1, 2013 at 12:19:48
Specs: Windows 7
The basic frying pan is available in several different metals, including cast iron, stainless steel, and aluminum. With a little shopping around, you might discover ceramic and copper pans, which are likely to be fairly expensive. Combination stainless steel and copper bottom pans are popular too. Copper-bottomed pans offer the highly durable qualities of steel with very good heat conduction.

Aluminum frying pans typically come with a non-stick coating. This can be a good conductor of heat and help you easily remove things from the pan. Non-stick coatings tend not to work well with metal tools and can begin to flake off after a while, so you should only use plastic tools with them.

Other aluminum pans made of anodized aluminum are much more durable, and you may notice tiny circular ridges in the pan which help to better conduct the heat evenly. Brands with these ridges are often quite expensive,however. Such pans are frequently the choice of professional chefs.


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#1
March 1, 2013 at 12:44:09
It seems you've done a lot of research on this subject.

Non stick coatings always break down over time. Always! No matter how careful you are with them. So if you don't mind buying new stuff every 3-5 years, then they are a good way to go. My wife bought a set of pots with non stick coating and even though we're both extremely careful with them (we only use plastic or wood in them), after about 4 years, they're already breaking down.

Those pans with the copper bottom do conduct well but copper's pretty soft and if you drop one on the corner of your stove or counter, it will dent and never sit flat properly again. It's the "sitting flat" that allows for best heat conduction.

I've tried most of the stuff you mentioned and found there's really no difference across the board as far as heat conduction goes with one exception. Cast iron. It heats slower and takes longer to cool down but you can drop one on your stove or counter and the only thing damaged will be your stove or counter. They make a good weapon too! (Tangled quote, "Frying pans.....who knew!?")

Personally, I favor cast iron frying pans. Once properly annealed, they'll last a lifetime, stand up to all kinds of abuse and unlike most every other pan, can be plunked down on a bed of coals in an open fire and will not only function perfectly, but better than any other pan mentioned. If you're not an outdoorsman (I am) then that's a non issue.

Since you never really asked a question. I have no answer, just the above observations from about 40 years of cooking.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
March 1, 2013 at 14:50:06
I agree with Curt R on the cast iron, I found one out in the woods once while on a camping trip half buried and i cleaned it and have been using it ever since(it looked like a pile of rust when i started.)

:: mike


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#3
March 1, 2013 at 21:22:55
'I found one out in the woods once while on a camping trip half buried and i cleaned it and have been using it ever since'
Yikes...who knows what that was used for!

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions 7 Golds


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#4
March 1, 2013 at 23:42:27
Yeah, no kitchen should be without a cast iron frying pan--the older the better. I found mine at goodwill. It was all rusted like someone had left it soaking in a sink for a week. I soon had it cleaned up wth rust remover and a wire brush drill attachment.

In addition you need a set of good stainless steel copper-bottom pots by revereware.


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#5
March 2, 2013 at 01:53:29
I agree. Cast Iron is the way to go. It gives great even cooking results once brought up to temperature, is robust and durable, and is generally too heavy for the little woman to swing so quickly that one cannot avoid the impact.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#6
March 2, 2013 at 06:21:28
is generally too heavy for the little woman to swing so quickly that one cannot avoid the impact.

But if she does make contact, it means they don't dent as easily as those other wimpy ones.

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/


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#7
March 2, 2013 at 12:28:57
Cast iron are more dangerous when they are coming your way.

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#8
March 2, 2013 at 21:35:11
Yikes...who knows what that was used for!

It really doesn't matter what it was used for. Once you're done cleaning it properly the annealing process will kill any/all remaining germs. And you always want to anneal a castiron frying pan before using it the first time and then reguarly (say once a year or so) forever after.

and is generally too heavy for the little woman to swing so quickly that one cannot avoid the impact.

ROFLMAO.

I know a girl who used one on the guy who was beating her. She couldn't swing it very well either so she waited till he was sleeping and nailed him once in the face.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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