Solved To bath or not to bath...

Gigabyte / Ga-78lmt-s2p
September 30, 2017 at 21:33:02
Specs: Windows 10, 8gig
.... that is the question. Why do Americans (and now unhappily gradually the rest of the world) refer to the toilet as the "bathroom"? The rooms sole purpose is to house a flushable porcelain bowl, and is aptly named a toilet. There is no bath in there so it cannot be a bathroom!

If there was then either statement "I'm going to the bathroom" or "I'm going to the toilet" would be correct. If there is in fact no bath then only the second statement is correct

It seems to me that in this age of political correctness these fine people will go to extremes to avoid saying the obvious.


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✔ Best Answer
October 1, 2017 at 15:04:39
like, well, because like well, ya know...


#1
September 30, 2017 at 22:45:13
You should check the etymology of the word "toilet".

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#2
October 1, 2017 at 00:47:27
It's euphemisms all the way down.


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#3
October 1, 2017 at 00:51:01
As a "noun" 'tis defined as a bathroom fixture (in some references); as a device equally it can be in its own room and the room described as such.

As a verb it's a procedure of cleansing, bathing etc..

But why in America (and sometimes in Canada too) they also refer to it as the rest room?


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#4
October 1, 2017 at 06:06:27
Euphemism I can live with but a "verb" is a tall order. That is an interesting comment from trvlr, I have seen them referred to as "rest rooms" in South Africa. But here in Aus. we have some pretty crass names for it but not mentionable here, but a toilet is a toilet is a toilet!

Regards

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#5
October 1, 2017 at 11:48:51
to p or not to p... that is the question...

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#6
October 1, 2017 at 15:00:27
How about "Lavatory"?
Perhaps they are coy.....

Even more important. Now that the word we used (in the UK at least) for being well dressed was "smart" do we now say someone has an intelligent suit?

And like why is everything like something like?

EDIT:
I'm so old that I remember when gay meant jolly (but not so old that I've forgotten).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#7
October 1, 2017 at 15:04:39
✔ Best Answer
like, well, because like well, ya know...

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#8
October 1, 2017 at 15:11:23
On the first day of kindergarten, I asked the teacher where I
could find "the men's room". She found that so amusing that
she told my mother about it later, who of course told me some
decades later.

In a residence or hotel suite I call it "the bathroom", everywhere
else I say "the restroom".

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
October 1, 2017 at 15:15:52
Then there are:
Loo (UK).
Dungy Dunny (Australian)

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#10
October 1, 2017 at 15:40:26
and then there's the "nettie" up in Tyneside (way north of London); or the backhoos...

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#11
October 1, 2017 at 19:31:32
Dunny Derek, dunny.

I remember being gay once!

Regards.


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#12
October 1, 2017 at 21:46:39
Ewen: Why do Americans (and now unhappily gradually the rest of the world) refer to the toilet as the "bathroom"?
'Cause there's a bath in there. Hard to miss; it's kinda big. Sometimes there's a shower without a bath, but no one calls it a showerroom. If there's no body cleansing facility, it's called a restroom or a half-bath if you're looking at houses.

While we're on the topic, why do the Brits call their cookies biscuits? And why do they call their biscuits scones? Why are their fries called chips and their chips called crisps?

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#13
October 1, 2017 at 22:46:20
@Derek - "Lavatory" is as big a euphemism as the other terms. "Loo", though a bit twee, has the advantage that it does have scatalogical origins. Best of all is "crapper".

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#14
October 2, 2017 at 05:18:00
Err my mistake Dungie -v- Dunny (although dungie is kinda descriptive).

I do call our shower room a shower room (it has a shower) and our bath room a bathroom (it has a bath - I just checked).

As an aside, why do they put frosted glass in the toilet window of an aircraft?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#15
October 2, 2017 at 05:38:01
to keep it cool - although I've not seen a loo window in any long distance jets I've travelled on... Must be on your private or hired on the day personal jets?

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#16
October 2, 2017 at 05:42:05

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#17
October 2, 2017 at 07:14:39
Seems my private jet designers got it right then.

Here's another loo equivalent:
Privy: "A toilet located in a small shed outside a house or other building".
[Past - historic, mostly].

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#18
October 16, 2017 at 09:47:23
that is the question. Why do Americans (and now unhappily gradually the rest of the world) refer to the toilet as the "bathroom"? The rooms sole purpose is to house a flushable porcelain bowl, and is aptly named a toilet. There is no bath in there so it cannot be a bathroom!

Most "bathroom's" have a bath tub in them these days. I wager regardless of where you live, if you have only one "bathroom" your's is configured to house a sink and tub as well as a toilet. Since you bathe in there, (ie: take a 'bath') then calling it a "bathroom" is right. Some homes have multiples bathrooms and some, as has been pointed out, have no tub or shower but always have a sink. Those are a "half bath" I have two bathrooms in my house and we recently renovated the one upstairs (last spring) It now has a massive shower in it as well as sink and toilet. We got rid of the standard 5' tub that was in there as I won't bathe in a tub that small (I'm 6'4" or 190 cm's). We renovated the downstairs bathroom a few years back and it now has a 6' soaker tub which my wife positively loves. She's tall too (5'10" or 175 cm's) I've used it a few times myself but I prefer to shower instead of bathe in a tub so the big shower we just put in is my cup of tea!

I'm a Canuck and we call them bathrooms. My wife's from the US and they call them restrooms in the US. It took her a while but now she calls it a bathroom too and has even asked for the "bathroom" when we're in the US. Why the US calls it a "Restroom" I don't know. It makes no sense to do so. Unless you call sitting on the toilet "resting" (I don't) then it's a misnomer as you don't go in there to rest. I've been in the US quite a bit and never seen a cot or bed in a public bathroom so why call it a restroom.........but that's the US for you. They like to pretend they invented the English language and everybody else is wrong.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#19
October 16, 2017 at 10:44:32
The "restroom" is where one takes care of the rest of the
digestive process.

It's as good a fake etymology as yours.

I'm pretty sure I've never referred to a public restroom as
a "bathroom", and I don't remember hearing the term used
that way until the last few years.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#20
October 19, 2017 at 09:51:18
Come to Canada and visit Jeff, you'll see "Bathroom" in public places. Just like you see restroom in the US.

As for "fake etymology" how could the term "bathroom" not be related directly to the fact that in pretty much every house in the America's, you can have a bath in that room that also houses the toilet?

I know back in the day when we all used outhouses, some lucky folks had a room with a tub in it. My grandma did. Grandpa actually enlarged that room after advent of running water in their home to accommodate a sink and toilet as well as the bathtub. The tub I remember was one of those big old cast iron claw footed tubs that my mom tells me was filled with pails prior to them getting indoor plumbing so to her it made sense to call it a "bathroom" since they bathed in there before there ever was a toilet in that room.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#21
October 20, 2017 at 06:51:45
Interesting about having the tub in the bathroom before
the toilet was brought inside. A few weeks ago I was given
a tour of the oldest existing house in Richfield Minnesota.
It was built by a relatively wealthy man from Ohio in 1852.
I don't remember seeing a bathroom, but I didn't go upstairs
to the second floor. There was a hand pump beside the
kitchen sink, but I'm not sure it was original to the house,
and it wasn't connected to anything. It could have drawn
water from the rainwater cistern located at the corner of the
house just outside the kitchen.

My comment about fake etymologies was in reference to
the word "restroom", not "bathroom". I don't know how the
word "restroom" originated, but my 1973 paper dictionary
says it is a U.S. term. The word "rest" in there seems
especially euphemistic.

A term I've seen used on architectural drawings is "water
closet", but I don't remember if it referred to the toilet or the
room it was in. The dictionary says it applies to both.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#22
October 20, 2017 at 08:10:46
mmm water closet was term much used in Victorian times in the UK... Later shortened to WC... Presumably arose at the time when wet sanitation - flushed toilets (loos...) arrived in the homes of those who could afford them... I recall when some friends of the family in a small mining village in West Durham county in the UK got the first WC installed (in the bathroom presumably, though it could equally have been where the outside dry/one holer had been) ), pholks came from all around to see it... My aunt had only the one holer in the back yard, with a door in the back wall of the lower chamber - for the honey wagon chaps to access and remove contents... Likewise we had a similar arrangement until sometime late in WW2 or just after...

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