Solved The OS/2 forum is closed

Ibm Os/2 warp 4.0 single license pack
May 7, 2013 at 17:46:41
Specs: OS/2, P266+/256Mb
OS/2 is no longer a Computing.net help forum. I am not surprised. I haven't seen a new post there for two years. Not even hobbyists venture toward OS/2 and those who have decided to try and get an old computer going tend to go for DOS or Windows 3.x.

But even Windows 3.1 is barely hanging on. DOS on the other hand, seems to have a much better pulse.

OS/2 Warp is hard to install beyond the basic for those unfamiliar with it. Setting up drivers and the internet can be very tough. There are a lot of cool old OS/2 programs out there and the LINKS browser is perfect for it.

OS/2 declined rapidly. Not even Serenity Systems seems to be able to generate a wider user base for the operating system. eComStation just isn't modern enough and users who prefer a PC environment outside of Windows have a wide choice of Linux distros to shop for.

I should also mention that BeOS is also deleted. Now BeOS had a really cool interface compared to OS/2. But it was obscure and not much software was available.


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#1
May 7, 2013 at 19:05:49
MisterGopher,

Yeah, I agree, it is a shame to see those once promising operating systems have pretty much died off. We recently did a cleaning of the forum and removed all content from before 2005. We did this so that our very large database of legacy content won't confuse users. After all, the vast majority of computer problems now have very little relevance when compared to questions asked 9+ years ago.

Once the OS/2 and BeOS forums were cleaned, there would have been almost nothing left. That is what required me to shut down those two forums.

Thanks for your understanding!
Justin


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#2
May 9, 2013 at 00:21:20
Everything from before 2005 is gone? Even the threads I saved as links in the dos and win 9x forums? Hey, I can't remember all that old stuff so I have a couple of text files with brief problem descriptions and computing.net URLs that have the solutions.

People still using those old OS's are going to have the same problems as were posted years ago and will need the old solutions. There was some unique stuff there. And anyway, how can legacy content confuse users who are using a legacy OS?

I gotta tell you, if all that old stuff is gone that was a really bad idea.

DAVEINCAPS - Made with REAL high fructose corn syrup.


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#3
May 9, 2013 at 06:00:33
✔ Best Answer
Hi,

Yes, its gone. Don't get me wrong, I did not want to remove that content. However, it had to be done. There are many ways that people could end up on legacy content. They do a search on the search engine on all sections, do a search on Google, etc. Further, it wasn't just the Windows 9x/DOS forums that had all that content. Almost every forum that existed pre-2005 had quite a bit of old content. The Security and CPU forum are a prime example.

We aren't just talking about a small amount of content either, it was a very large amount, enough to overwhelm search results.

I realize that the content could be useful in some special cases to people using legacy operating systems. However, here is the fact: The Windows 95/98 section represented 18% of all content on Computing.Net before the purge. Users coming to the site using that operating system represented .03% of the traffic. That was a major problem. Most of the time, people don't type in their operating system or, if they appear on the page through a search engine, don't notice the breadcrumbs. They just look at the content to try to find their answer.

We tried to "intelligently" remove the content with machine learning about a year ago. We removed 30% of the content, no one even noticed. However, it still resulted in the major discrepancies you see. Its just too much for a person to go over.

I'm sorry for the inconvenience, but there was really no choice. Based on my experience, I don't think its going to be an issue for 99% of users either. I realize your links may be broken, but the important question will be how often you need them.

Justin


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#4
May 9, 2013 at 12:50:56
Well, if it had to be done, then OK. It would have been nice to have a warning that it was coming. Some of the links I saved were instances where I went in quite a bit of detail on a question commonly asked such as "why does my new 80 gig drive only show 74 gig?" or "how do I install windows 98 from scratch?". Then when the question was asked again I would just link to my previously detailed response. Had I known this was coming I would have been able to save the pages on my drive or save the text.

Off hand I don't know how many of my saved links were pre 2005. I guess I'll find out when I try to use them. Having those links was like having a reference book that sits on the shelf most of the time. Even though you rarely use it as least you know it's there when you do need it.

DAVEINCAPS - Made with REAL high fructose corn syrup.


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#5
May 9, 2013 at 13:02:10
DAVEINCAPS,

Sorry about that, I didn't realize that someone might have had a "reference" list as you say with all of that older content. Hopefully almost all the content you need going forward from that list was post-2004. The main reason I didn't give notice was because, during the last removal I did, I never heard anything from anyone about it. Since those ones weren't missed, I figured it would be the same this time around. I hope I'm right. If not, I do apologize for the hassle.

Thanks,
Justin


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#6
May 9, 2013 at 19:23:38
There were a few times when looking up some really old stuff I'd get the computing.net 'not found' page. I thought that was odd but went on without it. I just figured the internet was conspiring against me again.

DAVEINCAPS - Made with REAL high fructose corn syrup.


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#7
May 10, 2013 at 07:05:11
DAVEINCAPS - your sentiments give me pause for thought on this issue. Computing.net has actually been somewhat heavy handed in deleting old posts. A lot of questions will have to be answered all over again.

However, even we old computer hobbyists forget stuff and have to look up how to do things. In fairness to computing.net, they are trying to stay current and were never a site that caters to legacy computing issues in the first place.

Let's face it though... OS/2 Warp and BeOS were dead forums. But Win 95/98, 3.x and DOS are still occasionally accessed for solutions to important issues. Whether they are relegated to the hobbyists and legacy dabblers should not enter into it.

Information is information and killing a cloud of information no matter how obsolete is fair to be questioned. On this point I think you are right. Some kind of solution for clearing the database should have taken some of this into account. But, it's their site and they can do whatever they want in the end.


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#8
May 10, 2013 at 07:50:54
MisterGopher,

I agree with you in theory. However, your point of: "they are trying to stay current and were never a site that caters to legacy computing issues in the first place" is the exact issue. Our problem now is that our legacy content is making search engines and other sites view us as old, out-of-date and a legacy site. Unfortunately, we have no control over their rules for what they consider, and they take the entire site as one entity. Its not like we can say, "Sure, there is a ton of legacy content, but only pay attention to our new content." The only thing we can do is delete it. That is the new paradigm, and we have to abide by it. There really is no choice.

Justin


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