Suggest a Software General forum

Hewlett-packard / Ny544aa-aba p6210f
September 10, 2011 at 19:00:06
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium (x64) Service Pack 1 (build 7601), 2.6 GHz / 5887 MB
Time and again I've thought of asking on this site about one software program or another I have. But often I've been unable to find the appropriate forum to ask.

Now, for hardware questions there is the Hardware General forum, which I have come to understand (though it's unstated) is the place for, for example hardware questions for which there is no obviously appropriate forum.

So I suggest the creation of the Software General forum.

Some of the programs I have and would post questions about are:

Active Words
a Really Small App
Core FTP LE
Everything
Foxit Reader
Jarte Pro
Karen's Power Tools - Time Sync
Recuva
SugarSync
Total Recorder

In typing that list I realized that a Utilities forum might be a good idea as well.


See More: Suggest a Software General forum

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#1
September 10, 2011 at 19:55:36
Hello,

This has been discussed before. My general feeling is that a general software forum would introduce more issues than it would solve. Many times, issues with software are directly related to other components (like the operating system, hardware, etc). That is why its better for a user to ask about that type of thing on an Operating System forum.

Justin


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#2
September 10, 2011 at 20:34:31
So all the programs I listed I could ask about on the Win 7 Forum, subcategory Software Problems, right? (My OS is Win7.)

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#3
September 11, 2011 at 07:00:00
Hi,

Yes. That is correct.

Justin


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Related Solutions

#4
September 11, 2011 at 10:04:46
There is however, an Office software forum which many folks don't use to post issues with say, MS Office. So, what happens is that either the question is answered in the forum it was posted in, or a moderator moves it to the Office forum. The same thing would probably happen to a general software forum.

win7

I have to admit that I am unfamiliar with many of the titles you listed. I don't know if that is my shortcoming or the fact those titles are obscure programs. At any rate, the best source for issues with a particular program, IMO, is at the program site. Many have an FAQ or even a forum for issues related to their software.


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#5
September 11, 2011 at 17:30:13
I see you use "Everything"... the greatest search engine going and it's free. get it here if you are interested: http://www.voidtools.com/

Here's a cut and paste from the FAQ:

"Everything" only uses file and folder names and generally takes a few seconds to build its database.
A fresh install of Windows XP SP2 (about 20,000 files) will take about 1 second to index.
1,000,000 files will take about 1 minute.


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#6
September 11, 2011 at 18:12:31
Yes, Everything is amazing. But I have a question for you. The FAQ mentions how to get the language pack. Do you know what that is?

Thanks


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#7
September 11, 2011 at 18:29:59
@Justin

This has been discussed before. My general feeling is that a general software forum would introduce more issues than it would solve. Many times, issues with software are directly related to other components (like the operating system, hardware, etc). That is why its better for a user to ask about that type of thing on an Operating System forum.

OK, but what about those many times the issue isn't related to the OS? If the OS is Win 7, then many people are going to see the question. But if the OS of the questioner is Windows Me, not so many..

And then there are the issues with software related to the questioner's OS, but is also related to some other OS's. Say the questioner's OS is Vista, but the issue is also related to XP and Win 7.

And so on.


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#8
September 12, 2011 at 07:05:14
Hey,

Yes, I understand that this could potentially happen. However, in that case, you would be relying on the user asking the question to understand when this would be the case. In most circumstances, I do not believe the user could determine this. In fact, in many circumstances, I'm sure not even experts on the site could determine exactly which operating systems, etc the question is relevant for or not.

That is why it is just easier for the user to ask on the Operating System forum for the OS he is running.

Justin


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#9
September 12, 2011 at 07:25:08
I wrote: OK, but what about those many times the issue isn't related to the OS? If the OS is Win 7, then many people are going to see the question. But if the OS of the questioner is Windows Me, not so many..

Sorry to persist, Justin, but that paragraph of mine should have been written so as to apply also to the cases where the issue is related to the OS, but not necessarily only to the user's OS. Don't you agree that a Windows ME user's post is much less likely to be seen by the experts? Or do the experts systematically make sure that they see all questions?

And how is the new user supposed to know the rule to post his question to his OS's forum unless there this is spelled out somewhere. How about a FAQ? Or is there one?

Thanks


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#10
September 12, 2011 at 08:12:46
Don't you agree that a Windows ME user's post is much less likely to be seen by the experts? Or do the experts systematically make sure that they see all questions?

By that logic there should be no forums at all and all posts shown to all experts. I believe experts look at the topics they are interested in and don't look at the topics that do not interest them. If someone posts about a software problem with Windows ME on a "General Software Forum" there is a very strong likelihood that the helper hasn't had experience with Windows Me in such a long time, that his instructions may be inaccurate. This is why a user running Windows Me should post on a Windows Me forum.

As for a FAQ, there is not a specific one. However, it always says to choose the "best available" or "most accurate" forum in the tooltips. I believe this is sufficient for the following reasons: The site used to have a faq, but it was rarely, if ever used. I have a lot of experience with how people ask questions on forums such as this (and this one in particular)... People rarely, if ever, read faqs like you describe before posting. Faqs are just too long for the average user. That is why I use tooltips.

I can see we aren't going to reach a meeting of the minds here, so let's just agree to disagree :)

Justin


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#11
September 12, 2011 at 08:17:16
win7

I think you are presuming way to much as far as the posters capabilities are concerned. As you stated, you are new here. If you observe for a while you will determine that you are lucky if they even post in the correct OS forum, let alone any sub-forums.

For example, a user of Windows 7 will post a query in the Win95/98 forum with an issue that is probably hardware related. The current solution for that is for a moderator to move the thread, or for any user to notify the webmaster that a thread is posted in the wrong forum. This seems to work fairly well.

To notify the webmaster of a problem with a thread, click on the Orange triangle at the upper right. You can then report the problem with the thread.


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#12
September 12, 2011 at 09:47:03
"I can see we aren't going to reach a meeting of the minds here, so let's just agree to disagree :)"

Justin,

OK, I agree. Thanks for putting up with me, and for running a site that has already proved of great value to me.



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#13
September 12, 2011 at 09:55:58
Over,

Thanks for helping me to understand how things really work around here. I think I will try out your tip about what I think you meant in your first reply, the Office Software: General forum.


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#14
September 12, 2011 at 09:56:41
win7zuki,

No problem... I appreciate the feedback!

Justin


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#15
September 12, 2011 at 10:01:04
Justin,

Good. Then I'll be back with more.


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