Public IPv4 Addresses Almost Exhausted

Custom / NA
October 18, 2010 at 12:51:39
Specs: Windows 7, i7 / 6GB
If you are here reading this, you are probably aware of the IPv4 issues, but a story I saw today on Slashdot seems to indicate we are perilously close to running out of public IPv4 address. You are probably also aware that the solution to this is using IPv6.

There are a ton of web sites, white papers, and even old-fashioned books on how to "prepare for the IPv6 transition", and manufactures of routers, switches, and other networking gear are already pushing "IPv6" compatible devices. I don't understand why the transition is such a big deal. It seems that IPv6 will affect very few home users, and even corporate users will only have a few minor things to deal with. The majority of the changes will affect ISPs, web hosts, etc.

Take for example the typical home user: a cable/dsl modem connected to a router that then connects multiple PCs. In this scenario, the only thing a transition to IPv6 would affect is the IP address on the public interface of the router. The router doesn't even need to support IPv6 on the internal interfaces, nor do any of the PCs. Assuming the router can support IPv6 on the public interface, that home user would never know (or care) when the ISP switches to using IPv6 addresses.

Anyhow, my question is, why is the transition to IPv6 such a big deal? I understand it being a big deal to ISPs, web hosts, etc., but as I mentioned earlier, there are numerous books, websites, etc. about IPv6 geared towards everyone but ISPs, web hosts, etc.

-Ryan Adams

Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com
Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#1
October 19, 2010 at 06:05:33
I may be wrong, but I think it is more about who will get the spoils from the conversion. There is a lot of cash to be made and the players are positioning.

Another issue is who controls the distribution of addresses.


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#2
October 19, 2010 at 07:20:50
...who controls the distribution of addresses

The Number Resource Organization (NRO) control the distribution of addresses on behalf of the five Regional Internet Registries (RIRs).

The subject Public IPv4 Addresses Almost Exhausted is based on NRO recent announcement that Less than 10% of IPv4 Addresses Remain Unallocated and that Deploying IPv6 is vital. What is at issue is that IPv6 is largely incompatible with IPv4 at the packet level since IPv4 uses 32 bits addresses while IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses.

http://www.nro.net/media/less-than-...

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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#3
October 19, 2010 at 09:37:42
I think anyone who doesn't respond after a receiving an answer here on Computing.net should have their IP address revoked.

When they discover the center of the universe, a lot of people will be disappointed to discover they are not it.
- Bernard Bailey


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Related Solutions

#4
October 19, 2010 at 11:25:44
Haha I like Seawatch's idea; let's start the petition!

My name is JRComp, and I approve this message.


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#5
October 26, 2010 at 08:39:18
The incompatibility at the packet level would only affect the device that does NAT from IPv6 to IPv4 though, no? Again, other than requiring a router/gateway that supports IPv6 on the Internet side, there would be nothing for home users (or many business users) to change.

-Ryan Adams

Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com
Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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