Solved Personal opinions about chrome books

Think pad / R51
April 5, 2015 at 08:13:33
Specs: Xp sp3, Almost none
Looking to get chrome book. Found one for a steal. However have no experiance with googles os. I have some experiance with lubunto linux(I understand it's lightly based on Linux)

My real question is I often don't have a reliable connection and it seems like its more reliant on cloud type services. So is it worth it for off line use?

::mike


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✔ Best Answer
April 7, 2015 at 11:33:33
Yeah, sewing thread, but what you forgot to mention is these folk were dab hands at soldering their buttons on.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
April 5, 2015 at 09:47:40
Paper is much better for a book...; a lot lighter and more environmentally friendly. Chrome is a toxic metal in some situations...

But more seriously... how much would you use the Chrome gadget? Is it worth splashing out on something you may not use that much? And if you are struggling with an unreliable home connection how are you going to download and so on on a regular basis (other than to use a local freebie connection if exists; or that of a local chum)?

Although I've no experience with Google systems - apart from the Iron browser (allegedly based on the same roots as Chrome browser) I would be more inclined to go with something that has a decent history behind it; be that M$ - based or Apple's OS/iOS?


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#2
April 5, 2015 at 17:23:01
trvlr
Just being a peasant but SWIron is actually based on Chromium not Chrome. The subtle difference is that it is therefore twice removed from Google Chrome which for folk like me would be a bonus.

I have Chromium on-board (nicely stitched up) but normally use either Firefox or IE.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#3
April 6, 2015 at 03:26:39
Can't get away wiv enyphink these days... In my research lab days (an age ago in the late 50s) we woz rather lax at times and sometimes called it chromium, and occasionally chrome. And of course we had genuine chrome/chromium trim on cars, bikes, and the wheels too; and the genuine solid steel bumpers (fenders?) were liberally coated with the stuff too (if the car was pre war as was my first car - a Rover 14, 1938 vintage).

Not really sure what's on them now... Allegedly chrome no doubt but who knows (only The Shadow knows - as anyone of a certain age will remember in Canada/US)...


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#4
April 6, 2015 at 09:56:32
trvlr
But what you might not remember or even know about is a product called "Chromit" (yeah Chrome it) which existed years ago in the UK. It was sold in tins I think, at market stalls. You simply rubbed away with it on metals which developed a bright Chrome shine. Great for those tatty lamp reflectors on bicycles and so forth. Really great, so what was the catch? Umm...it completely vanished after about 3 days.

Straying off even further, there was also a product known as "Solderline" (in tubes). You could put it on wiring joints and it look as good as any soldered joint with a lot less hassle. What was the catch? Well it was made of plastic - not really the best conductor in wiring. Quite infuriating when someone had squirted it on every joint in radios (before PCB's came along). A real game to remove because it then then resisted proper soldering and most probably the fumes were toxic.

mikelinus
Please excuse me from spattering you post with chat. One memory leads to another I guess. I really will try to stop now.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#5
April 7, 2015 at 07:49:36
No biggie. I put it in the lounge. Mostly I was hoping for insight and there is plenty of that. Regardless of the topic.

::mike

message edited by mikelinus


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#6
April 7, 2015 at 09:39:29
Plastic solder was superceded by sewing thread... I frequently found (when I used to repair domestic electronics in my spare time) sewing thread had been used to tie broken connections (wire ends of resistors/condensers (capacitors) and general connecting wires) back on to from wherever they had been detached.

My pa (he was a tv engineer post war) frequently found the same. And if one asked the "owner" of the set (usually a tv but occasionally a radio/radiogram) "Has anyone had the back off or been inside...?" the answer was invariably "no". Yet the back was frequently totally detached - even a distance away; or poorly replaced; and of course the sewing thread - and even candle wax was in evidence...


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#7
April 7, 2015 at 11:33:33
✔ Best Answer
Yeah, sewing thread, but what you forgot to mention is these folk were dab hands at soldering their buttons on.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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