Solved Opt for Networking or Programming field suggestions

June 28, 2012 at 12:50:50
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Hi i am raviteja and i recently completed my B-Tech(computer science) of 2012 pass-out. My problem is i'm totally confused and unable to decide in which field should i've to go now, in Networking or Programming. I'm currently preparing for the CCNA certification and i've no experience in hardware/networking before. So should i go for Networking or Programming coz i'm worried about the growth in career and salary package. Plz give your valuable suggestions for guiding my future. Thank you all in advance and waiting for your replies.

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✔ Best Answer
July 2, 2012 at 07:36:30
William Henley isn't my name. It's the name of the poet who's poem I'm quoting in my tag.....lol.

You always start at the bottom and work your way up.....period, end of story. Nobody walks out of school and starts at the top. You have to work your way up.

You can get a good idea what's out there by comparing available job positions. Search all the headhunter sites and classified ads for local newspapers and whatever you can. I suspect you'll find more variety in the programming side of things. Networking specifically is a narrower field I think.

The next level up from me would be my boss, the "Manager of Infrastructure". Where I work, there is no level below me.

As to how much you can potentially earn, that too I can't say. I get paid pretty good where I work and have excellent benefits. What I can tell you is to compare available jobs and see what they pay. Take a look at the higher-end jobs in each field to see what you could be making 5 years down the road.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
June 28, 2012 at 13:24:43
Go for the one that interests you most. Don't worry about salary; they are both well paid. Better to spend a lifetime doing something you enjoy than a lifetime of drudgery just to amass riches.

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#2
June 28, 2012 at 22:18:58
Thank you for your suggestion and i'l go for the one which interests me.

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#3
June 29, 2012 at 06:15:41
Hi Ravite,

with regard to programming, perhaps website design is the most progressive currently, with salary to match.

Whichever path you choose to follow, bear in mind it is most important to stay upto date with the continuing developments in 'our' technology.

Good Luck for the future - Mike.



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Related Solutions

#4
July 1, 2012 at 09:51:53
Go for the one that interests you most.

Solid advice that!

I'm a network technician by trade and have been specializing in the field of Enterprise level networking for 7+ years now. That, after about 12 years working in most all other areas of IT excluding programming (I totally suck at programming).

My experience with Comp Sci degrees is they lean more towards programming than any other area of IT. Especially networking. If you like programming, you're at least prepared and qualified for an entry level position in that field. With nothing but a Comp Sci degree, you're not qualified for an entry level position in networking.

Even with Cisco certifications, you're not. My place of employ has only 2 Cisco switches left in production out of a total of over 100 high density switches (we're phasing the Cisco out, thank goodness!). Cisco certs would do you no good where I work.

A Cisco cert with no experience is no help even in a solely Cisco shop. I have a years of experience working with Cisco products but no Cisco certs. In a head-to-head competition for a job in a Cisco shop, I'd get the position before a green grad with no experience that has a Cisco cert would.

I'm not saying don't try to get into networking. What I'm trying to say is, you'll have to build up to it. Get jobs for small companies where you have to do everything, including networking. Get hands-on experience working with Cisco products, get experience working with VLAN's and VPN"s and all the other fun techonologies involved and then when you have some solid experience, you can finally start applying for specialized positions like mine.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
July 1, 2012 at 23:43:02
Thank you very much William Henley sir, for your suggestion but i've another query regarding in Networking. The thing is that, does we've to work in the same position for years in Networking field to get to next-level position and where-as in Programming there's a chance of getting early next-level positions to work. Please forgive me if my questions seems stupid, but i just want to know, does networking has a slow career growth compared to programming? And what about the salary as a fresher in networking?

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#6
July 2, 2012 at 07:36:30
✔ Best Answer
William Henley isn't my name. It's the name of the poet who's poem I'm quoting in my tag.....lol.

You always start at the bottom and work your way up.....period, end of story. Nobody walks out of school and starts at the top. You have to work your way up.

You can get a good idea what's out there by comparing available job positions. Search all the headhunter sites and classified ads for local newspapers and whatever you can. I suspect you'll find more variety in the programming side of things. Networking specifically is a narrower field I think.

The next level up from me would be my boss, the "Manager of Infrastructure". Where I work, there is no level below me.

As to how much you can potentially earn, that too I can't say. I get paid pretty good where I work and have excellent benefits. What I can tell you is to compare available jobs and see what they pay. Take a look at the higher-end jobs in each field to see what you could be making 5 years down the road.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#7
July 3, 2012 at 02:00:07
Hi Ravite,

regarding your career ladder, it is most important to put yourself first and not your employer.

Move on, when conditions determine. e.g. salary, later technology elsewhere, better prospects. etc.

When I started in computing (mainframes) the average one stayed in a position then was 2 years.

By and large, the days of a lifelong career with the same company have long gone. Often when it suits, employees are discarded. Here in the UK, generally an employer acts as a purchaser, trying to buy the best for the least.

Good Luck - keep us posted.


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