Now a question about refrigerator freezer lamps.

June 4, 2017 at 12:46:56
Specs: several
The apartment I just moved into has a Whirlpool "top mount"
refrigerator, meaning the freezer compartment is above the
main refrigerator compartment. It is model ET21NKXGW02.
The Use & Care Guide I have does not refer specifically to
that model number, but the illustrations make it obvious that
it is for the family of refrigerators which includes this model.

The Guide has a short section "To change the freezer light".
I see no light in my freezer. There is no switch in the freezer
door frame as there is in the refrigerator compartment.

How difficult would it be to add an LED light to the freezer?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#1
June 4, 2017 at 13:05:21
Weird that you posted this. My Freezer light went out a week ago, and I've been trying to decide if I want to pay for an appliance bulb (I assume that's what it takes) to replace it.

But, I'm guessing that doesn't help you at all. :)

Doing the best I can here... And remember, there's always more than one path to success. :)


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#2
June 4, 2017 at 13:06:08
Anything you might install would have to preserve the integrity of the freezer compartment - as in not break the inner shell. So no wires going entering/leaving; nor any lamp housing inserted in a fixed sense...

Best you might achieve - a battery operated unit, with a micro switch positioned so as to activate on/off when the door is opened/closed.

Otherwise - again a battery operated led unit and user has to manually switch the light on/off accordingly - no wired in switch....


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#3
June 4, 2017 at 13:15:51
One of those head lamp things would work too. :) Or a flashlight.

Doing the best I can here... And remember, there's always more than one path to success. :)

message edited by Jennifer SUMN


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Related Solutions

#4
June 4, 2017 at 13:55:13
Ah yes - good idea Hasgropper...

One could have it hanging next to the freezer and put it on one's head before opening the freezer... :-))


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#5
June 4, 2017 at 14:42:24
trv, you get me. :)

Doing the best I can here... And remember, there's always more than one path to success. :)


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#6
June 4, 2017 at 16:55:47
Jennifer Re #1.
Remove the bulb and check its size and ratings. It might not be particularly special at all - mine wasn't.
[An oven bulb is a different ball game - and ordinary one wouldn't last long at such high temperatures].

Jeff
Not sure whether it is worth it but as long as you don't go through refrigerant lines you should be OK. Clearly you would need a reasonable seal around anything you fit. You would obviously need to ensure that the fittings you use are electrically safe. For instance, most fridge lamps are in an enclosure.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
June 4, 2017 at 19:43:50
Put a flash light on top (or next) to the freezer.... ;-)

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#8
June 5, 2017 at 09:22:46
I agree generally with trvlr and Derek that any wires going from
outside to inside need to be sealed up fairly well, but it isn't as
critical as a spacecraft or a submarine. I'm sure most refrigerators
are somewhat leaky. As for actually doing it -- I may be stopped
by the amount of effort required, rather than by the difficulty of
that effort. It would mean having the freezer open for several
hours, which means having to empty the compartment and then
refill it. Maybe empty the whole refrigerator. Holy cow. I just
remembered that I could use the community refrigerator in the
activity room to store my stuff temporarily. It's usually mostly
empty. One objection overcome. It still sounds like a lot of work,
though, and I really hate things that sound like a lot of work....
And it still sounds like something I could easily screw up. Done
that plenty of times. I'm a perfectionist. I keep working on a
thing and working on it, trying to make it better and better untIl
I've completely destroyed it.

I've never electrocuted myself (or anyone else), though.

If I power the light from AC ("mains"), should I try to take it from
somewhere inside the refrigerator? Could I do that without
violating some NEMA or NIST or city code? (Nevermind the
building rules: I have those at hand and can read them, and
maybe even follow them. Possibly even understand them.)

Jennifer's suggestion in her second post to use a flashlight or
a head-mounted light made me think that I could mount the
light on the top edge of the outside of the freezer door, and the
switch for it could be entirely outside the compartment, too.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#9
June 5, 2017 at 09:27:31
Wow, you've got a laid back land lord, don't ya? I've never had one that would allow me to cut holes in his freezer.

Then again I never asked, so maybe they'd have said yes?

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#10
June 5, 2017 at 12:29:33
Simplest approach.

Battery powered led lamp that is designed to fit under shelves, in cupboards etc. The type that have either an integral on/off switch or one presses the unit to operate on/off. Stick it the side/top of the freezer with a suitable adhesive - perhaps silicon sealant even?

Home Depot havde them very likely; and other outfits too; Target, Frys etc.?

message edited by trvlr


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#11
June 5, 2017 at 13:52:14
Simpler approach - leave it alone. It appears it's not your fridge so you have no right to modify it. A battery powered light would likely be OK, but is it really necessary? Is the freezer compartment so HUGE that you can't see all the way to the back?

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#12
June 5, 2017 at 14:50:19
If it's really HUGE... one might lost when going deep inside its innards; and not be able to find one's way out in the dark..?

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#13
June 5, 2017 at 18:26:16
Razor,

I'm not renting. The place I'm in is a co-operative, which means
I own the apartment, but have to follow a lot of rules. For example,
No modifications to the supporting structure of the building. :-) I own
the refrigerator, but when I leave and sell the apartment, the refrigerator
stays with the apartment. So I'll have to read the rules closely to suss
what the limits are on what I can do to it. I asked if the dishwasher
could be omitted, but that was not an option. A dishwasher comes
with every unit, whether I want one or not.

trvlr,

I just removed two of those under-cabinet battery-powered LED
lamps from the kitchen in the the apartment I'm moving out of.
You made me realize that I should put one in the freezer and see
if it will work. They turned out to be rather dim after I installed
them a few years ago, the batteries don't last that long, and all
the people who turned it on-- including me-- tended to forget to
turn it off. I don't care for the idea of having to turn it on and off
each time I want light in the freezer. So an automatic switch is
a must. And I expect the batteries to die completely at freezer
temperatures. So a connection to the outside world is probably
a must as well.

riider,

I'm spoiled by having lights in the freezer compartment of the
side-by-side refrigerator I've had for the last year or so, that I'm
probably going to spend a couple of hours cleaning this evening.
The freezer in the new refrigerator is only big enough to hide one
or two bodies in, but it seems very dark inside unless I turn on
the main ceiling light.

Overall, I'm not liking this refrigerator. Bad sight-lines, parts with
sharp edges (even if plastic) sticking out right where I need to put
my arm in order to reach inside.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
June 6, 2017 at 02:21:01
Some of the more current battery led lights are brighter than previous versions. You "might" be able to install (i.e. connect by suitable wiring) an external switch to such a unit. That switch being a pressure (off/on type) micro switch. They are available as cabinet or closet door mains switches; and designed to be installed so that when the door is closed the switch activator (usually a spring loaded projection) is depressed and opens (turns off) the switch cct.. Opening the door releases the switch actuator so that the cct. is completete. They are usually very slim and could be installed fairly easily so as to make the physical contact with the fridge or freezer door (or lid). The switch could be fully enclosed in water tight sealant of some sort, and afixed to the freezer wall by a suitable adhesive good to low temperatures; or even afixed to the door/lid and the lamp wherever inside the freezer/fridge.. The wires between lamp and switch can be a suitably ok to low temperatures spec.?

Batteries might be rechargeables?


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#15
June 6, 2017 at 09:14:55
Correction: I used the plural "lights" when I described what was in
my previous refrigerator freezer compartment. It has only one light,
but it was placed so that it did a fairly good job of lighting up the
whole compartment.

I said I would probably spend a couple of hours cleaning that
refrigerator. I didn't note the time, but it seemed like a couple of
hours, and I only finished the freezer compartment and both door
seals. I discovered that my sister had already cleaned the outside
parts that could be accessed without pulling it away from the wall.
I'll finish the main refrigerator compartment and all the shelves
today. I promise.

Definitely no rechargeable batteries. The reason for batteries is
to avoid wires from the outside world, so recharging them means
removing them from inside the refrigerator and recharging them
outside. Which means much more work and more time with the
freezer door open. No good.

Here, I'll grab those two undercabinet lights and test them both
right now. If one seems to be brighter than the other (have more
oomph left in its alkaline batteries), I'll pop that one into the freezer.
We'll see if the batteries can still put out after several hours below
freezing. I'll put the light in a zip-lock bag to reduce the amount of
frost or condensation on it.

Done. The lights had indistinguishable brightness. One is now in
the freezer, possibly getting tested to destruction. A price of
perfectionism.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#16
June 7, 2017 at 08:02:25
Well!

I left one of the undercabinet lights in the freezer all afternoon
and all night, and when I took it out just now, it worked as well
as the room-temperature light. At least for a few seconds. I'm
resisting using up the batteries for this test. I really expected
the batteries to be too weak at that temperature to make the
LEDs work at all.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#17
June 8, 2017 at 02:54:02
Hi Jennifer,

on the subject of Frig Bulbs, here in in the UK cheapo stores such as 'The Pound Shop' often they are sold 2 for £1.

However, irrespective of where purchased, replacement Bulbs never seem to last as long as the original ones. Hence whenever I see a dumped Frig, I collect its Bulb.
Furthermore there is no standard for Bulbs,
e.g. connector type (BC or ES) and/or size of such.

Good Luck - Keep us posted

message edited by Mike Newcomb


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